PDA

View Full Version : The cinema thread



Pages : [1] 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16

Fuuma
09-17-2006, 11:22 AM
What the title says, feel free to post anything related to films.</p>

I&#39;ll start with the cinematic equivalent of &quot;what are you wearing today&quot;, here are the last movies I watched, if you want comments on some of them go ahead and ask.</p><ul> Man push cart/USA/Bahrani/2005 Berlin, symphony of a great city/Germany/Ruttmann/1927 Dammi i colori/Albania/Sala/2003 Emak-Bakia/France/Ray/1926 &Eacute;toile de mer, l&#39;/France/Ray/1928 Entr&#39;acte/France/Clair/1924 Little miss sunshine/USA/Dayton&amp;Faris/2006 Under the sun of satan/France/Pialat/1987 Clean/France/Assayas/2004[/list]

</p>

droogist
09-20-2006, 07:07 PM
Walter Ruttmann, cool. He was a genious composer too.
</p>

How did you like Clean? Ive been anxious to see it (Irma Vep is a big favorite of mine) but just haven&#39;t got around to it yet...
</p>

mass
09-21-2006, 03:05 AM
the last film i watched was the proposition. not bad, but not great... i'm very much looking forward to johnnie to's exiled. my favorite filmmaker is michelangelo antonioni although my favorite film is le samourai. actually my favorite melville film is le doulos; maybe that's weird (my favorite antonioni is la notte). oddly enough you've got an antonioni quote in your sig and have had a delon avatar. there was an antonioni retrospective here recently and i missed it! although i did catch the passenger when it first showed late last year.

Fuuma
09-21-2006, 11:14 AM
Walter Ruttmann, cool. He was a genious composer too.
</p>

How did you like Clean? Ive been anxious to see it (Irma Vep is a big favorite of mine) but just haven&#39;t got around to it yet...
</p>

</p><p class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt"><span lang="EN-CA" style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Arial">It&rsquo;s the only Ruttmann film I&rsquo;ve seen though, more like a classical music videoclip/montage exalting modernity and how the city functions like one great big organism.</span></p><p class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt"><span lang="EN-CA" style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Arial"></span></p><p class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt"><span lang="EN-CA" style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Arial">As for Clean I&rsquo;ve found it quite enjoyable if you accept the fact that this is, for the most part, a straight up melodrama with top notch acting from Cheung who really goes out of her comfort zone in this one. She&rsquo;s not her usual shy, quiet and meditative type here but avoid the all too common pitfall of ending up being a reverse caricature of her typical onscreen (and probably off-screen) personality. Once again you have some references to a lesbian relationship involving Cheung, which I&rsquo;m starting to think is some kind of fantasy or inside joke from her ex-husband (Assayas). There is also the, I assume, self-referential and somewhat funny/critical references to the entertainment world (in this case music) and a kickass soundtrack to boot. I must say I tend not to notice Assayas&rsquo; direction, I can&rsquo;t even tell if there was an overdose of the patented melodramatic close-up. This is not, in fact, an oblique critique of Assayas&rsquo; approach but more of a sign that what really stuck with me was the overall feel and storyline and what it evoked more than any directorial tricks. </span><span lang="EN-CA"></span></p>

</p>

Fuuma
09-21-2006, 11:38 AM
the last film i watched was the proposition. not bad, but not great... i&#39;m very much looking forward to johnnie to&#39;s exiled. my favorite filmmaker is michelangelo antonioni although my favorite film is le samourai. actually my favorite melville film is le doulos; maybe that&#39;s weird (my favorite antonioni is la notte). oddly enough you&#39;ve got an antonioni quote in your sig and have had a delon avatar. there was an antonioni retrospective here recently and i missed it! although i did catch the passenger when it first showed late last year.</p><p class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt"><span lang="EN-CA" style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Arial">I haven&rsquo;t read anything about To&rsquo;s next project (Exiled) but I haven&rsquo;t watched Election (the first one) yet so I&rsquo;ll do that first (saw about 1hour but there was some problem with the disc, will re-watch it soon). I must say I&rsquo;m a big fan of Milky Way studio&rsquo;s somewhat contradictory brand of maverick commercial filmmaking. Some of my favourite entries, mostly gangster films, include The mission, The odd one dies, Expect the unexpected, The longest nite, Needing you, Running out of time and even the heroic trio.</span></p><p class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt"><span lang="EN-CA" style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Arial"></span></p><p class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt"><span lang="EN-CA" style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Arial">I must say I am also an enormous fan of Melville, with Le samoura&iuml; occupying a soft spot but I&rsquo;d be hard pressed to say it&rsquo;s a better film than say L&rsquo;arm&eacute;e des ombres or Bob le flambeur or any of his other films for that matter.</span></p><p class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt"><span lang="EN-CA" style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Arial"></span></p><p class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt"><span lang="EN-CA" style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Arial">Antonioni has really fallen in recent years but somebody who had the following exchange can never be considered without respect IMHO:</span></p><p class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt"><span lang="EN-CA" style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Arial"></span></p><p class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt; line-height: 11.25pt"><span><span lang="EN-CA" style="font-size: 7.5pt; font-family: Verdana">&ldquo;Antonioni: ...I dyed the grass around the shed on the edge of the marsh in order to reinforce the sense of desolation, of death. The landscape had to be rendered truthfully: when the trees are dead, they have that colour.</span>
<span class="italics1">Godard: The drama is no longer psychological, but plastic.</span>
<span class="italics1">Antonioni: It&#39;s the same thing.</span>
<span class="italics1">&mdash;Antonioni and Godard on the use of colour in The Red Desert (Cahiers du Cinema in English, January, 1966)&rdquo;</span></span></p><p class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt; line-height: 11.25pt"><span class="italics1"><span lang="EN-CA" style="font-size: 7.5pt; font-style: normal; font-family: Verdana"></span></span></p><p class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt; line-height: 11.25pt"><span class="italics1"><span lang="EN-CA" style="font-size: 10pt; font-style: normal; font-family: Arial">BTW I still have a Delon avatar on the styleforum, but it&rsquo;s one taken from the recent, horrendously bad TV series Frank Riva, which is basically a bad case of decrepit Delon worship. I must say the man only refers to himself using the third person (calling himself Alain Delon this, Alain Delon that) and is now a dangerous right-wing egomaniacal nutcase.</span></span></p><p class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt; line-height: 11.25pt"><span class="italics1"><span lang="EN-CA" style="font-size: 10pt; font-style: normal; font-family: Arial"></span></span></p><p class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt; line-height: 11.25pt"><span class="italics1"><span lang="EN-CA" style="font-size: 10pt; font-style: normal; font-family: Arial">I did also catch the restored version of The Passenger and must say Antonioni&rsquo;s films, with their focus on architecture and plastic beauty really shine on the big screen. He seems to have a painter&rsquo;s approach to filming which make large screen viewings breathtaking.</span></span></p><p class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt; line-height: 11.25pt"><span class="italics1"><span lang="EN-CA" style="font-size: 10pt; font-style: normal; font-family: Arial"></span></span></p><p class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt; line-height: 11.25pt"><span class="italics1"><span lang="EN-CA" style="font-size: 10pt; font-style: normal; font-family: Arial">Two movies I&rsquo;ve recently watched:</span></span></p><p class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt; line-height: 11.25pt"><span class="italics1"><span style="font-size: 10pt; font-style: normal; font-family: Arial">Vengeance is mine/Japan/Imamura/1979</span></span></p><p class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt; line-height: 11.25pt"><span class="italics1"><span style="font-size: 10pt; font-style: normal; font-family: Arial">Police story 3/HK/Tong/1992</span></span></p>

</p>

mass
09-21-2006, 07:13 PM
i agree on all points about antonioni and melville. have you ever read the book melville on melville (it's been out of print forever and i am desperately trying to find a copy)? it's a good book, reminds me of the hitchcock/truffaut book. in it he's asked if he would ever remake bob le flambeur (or allow it to be remade, if i remember) and he of course says no (the book was published right after he made le cercle rouge, although in it he says that le cercle rouge would be his last film and he didn't plan on making any more). i believe he passed away shortly after shooting un flic? not sure who could have allowed the good thief to happen. and isn't john woo remaking le cercle rouge? ugh.



by the way exiled is somewhat of a sequel to the mission. from the trailers i've seen it seems to make sense. most of the original actors are in it also but i'm not sure if they're reprising their roles. have you seen ptu? i highly recommend it.



and i definitely think people who speak in the third person are ahead of their time.

Fuuma
09-22-2006, 11:17 AM
i agree on all points about antonioni and melville. have you ever read the book melville on melville (it&#39;s been out of print forever and i am desperately trying to find a copy)? it&#39;s a good book, reminds me of the hitchcock/truffaut book. in it he&#39;s asked if he would ever remake bob le flambeur (or allow it to be remade, if i remember) and he of course says no (the book was published right after he made le cercle rouge, although in it he says that le cercle rouge would be his last film and he didn&#39;t plan on making any more). i believe he passed away shortly after shooting un flic? not sure who could have allowed the good thief to happen. and isn&#39;t john woo remaking le cercle rouge? ugh.

by the way exiled is somewhat of a sequel to the mission. from the trailers i&#39;ve seen it seems to make sense. most of the original actors are in it also but i&#39;m not sure if they&#39;re reprising their roles. have you seen ptu? i highly recommend it.

and i definitely think people who speak in the third person are ahead of their time.</p><p class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt"><span lang="EN-CA" style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Arial">Melville on Melville is the Noguiera(sp) book, right? I have a nice vintage copy of the Hitchbook but sadly don&rsquo;t own the Melville equivalent.</span></p><p class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt"><span lang="EN-CA" style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Arial"></span></p><p class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt"><span lang="EN-CA" style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Arial">I actually quite enjoyed the good thief, having taken it for what it is, a totally different film remade from what I must admit is, for the general viewer, an obscure source. I like how Jordan infused the movie with his own idiosyncrasies, never falling in stultifying hero worship or obsessive recreation, a la Gus Van Sant&rsquo;s psycho. As for John Woo, although he made some of the greatest bullet ballet movies of the 80s and 90s he is now fallen so far off I don&rsquo;t even bother watching his new releases.</span></p><p class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt"><span lang="EN-CA" style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Arial"></span></p><p class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt"><span lang="EN-CA" style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Arial">PTU was an enjoyable viewing but I still had reservation about it&rsquo;s rhythm. BTW you&rsquo;ve now gotten me quite interested in Exiled.</span></p><p class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt"><span lang="EN-CA" style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Arial"></span></p><p class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt"><span style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Arial">I recently saw:</span></p><p class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt"><span style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Arial">Les visiteurs du soir/France/Carn&eacute;/1942</span></p><p class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt"><span style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Arial"></span></p><p class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt"><span lang="EN-CA" style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Arial">This was at La cin&eacute;math&egrave;que and they&rsquo;ll have a Chantal Akermann retrospective soon, she&rsquo;ll even be present at some of the s&eacute;ances.[&lt;:o)]</span></p>

</p>

xcoldricex
09-22-2006, 10:24 PM
shinobi/2006/shimoyama
survive style 5+/2004 /sekiguchi</p>

clean is decent? maybe i&#39;ll watch it, it&#39;s lying around my house somewhere.
</p>

Fuuma
09-23-2006, 09:08 PM
shinobi/2006/shimoyama
survive style 5+/2004 /sekiguchi</p>

clean is decent? maybe i&#39;ll watch it, it&#39;s lying around my house somewhere.
</p>

</p>

Yeah I&#39;d recommend it, especially if you likedIrma Vep. Survive style 5+ is quite quirky/wacky isn&#39;t it? I liked the coat that Asano was wearing, it was quite an eyeful [:D]</p>

Faust
09-23-2006, 09:11 PM
Damn, and I thought Kusturica was esoteric. You guys are on the ball, I have to research these names. Thanks.

mass
09-23-2006, 10:28 PM
quirky/wacky is an understatement for ss5+!



"i'm not homo... i'm gay"

*cue music

xcoldricex
09-23-2006, 10:33 PM
i watched ss5+ without any background knowledge about.. man, was it a nice surprise! the costuming of asano and his girlfriend were great too! </p>

haha after i saw his trench i thought it should&#39;ve been produced by junya watanabe under his eYe line :)
</p>

Fuuma
09-26-2006, 12:13 PM
Rcently saw:</p>

The lover/France-Vietnam/Annaud/1992</p>

Rebel without a cause/USA/Ray/1955</p>

Fuuma
09-26-2006, 12:14 PM
I recently posted a top100 (those things are silly but great discussion starters) with short comments on TFS, anybody thinks it might be worth re-posting here?

Faust
09-26-2006, 12:26 PM
I recently posted a top100 (those things are silly but great discussion starters) with short comments on TFS, anybody thinks it might be worth re-posting here?</p>

you bet.</p>

xcoldricex
09-27-2006, 09:40 AM
yes, please do

Fuuma
09-27-2006, 12:38 PM
<p class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt"><u><span lang="EN-CA"><font size="3"><font face="Times New Roman">Fuuma&rsquo;s &ldquo;top 100&rdquo; movies</font></font></span></u></p><p class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt"><span lang="EN-CA"><font size="3"><font face="Times New Roman">How it works:</font></font></span></p><ul style="margin-top: 0cm" type="disc"><li class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt; tab-stops: list 36.0pt"><span lang="EN-CA"><font size="3"><font face="Times New Roman">I&rsquo;ll make a post for every decade, starting with the 1910s, for a total of 100 movies</font></font></span><li class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt; tab-stops: list 36.0pt"><span lang="EN-CA"><font size="3"><font face="Times New Roman">I didn&rsquo;t include more than two movies by the same director for variety&rsquo;s sake</font></font></span><li class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt; tab-stops: list 36.0pt"><span lang="EN-CA"><font size="3"><font face="Times New Roman">The list is, of course, heavily slanted towards my own taste; for example you&rsquo;ll find a proportionally large numbers of French films</font></font></span><li class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt; tab-stops: list 36.0pt"><span lang="EN-CA"><font size="3"><font face="Times New Roman">I tried to give the list a modern slant by including a lot of recent films (80s and up)</font></font></span><li class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt; tab-stops: list 36.0pt"><span lang="EN-CA"><font size="3"><font face="Times New Roman"><span></span>Those are only small blurbs, if you&rsquo;re interested in one of those movies, feel free to ask, I like watching &lsquo;em and I like talking about &lsquo;em!</font></font></span>[/list]

Fuuma
09-27-2006, 12:39 PM
Fuuma&#39;s top 100 movies: 10&#39;s</p><ul><li class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt"><span lang="EN-CA"><font size="3"><font face="Times New Roman">Vampires, les/France/Feuillade/1916: Engrossing crime serial with a macabre edge, the main character is boring but you&rsquo;ll be cheering for the amoral members of &ldquo;les vampires&rdquo; gang</font></font></span>[/list]

Fuuma
09-28-2006, 03:54 PM
<u>Fuuma&#39;s top 100 movies: 20s</u></p><ul> <div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt"><span lang="EN-CA"><font size="3"><font face="Times New Roman">Cabinet of Dr. Caligari, the/Germany/Wiene/1920: Made in the aftermath of WW1. Not so subtle critique of the powers that be, the nightmarish landscapes of this expressionistic movie are a sight to behold</font></font></span></div> <div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt"><span lang="EN-CA"><font size="3"><font face="Times New Roman">Nosferatu/Germany/Murnau/1922: Another fine example of German expressionism, this one is truly creepy thanks to Max Schreck eerily performance who owes as much to the elaborate gestures of theatre actors as to the much more restrained style that would soon emerge in the cinematic world. </font></font></span></div> <div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt"><span lang="EN-CA"><font size="3"><font face="Times New Roman">Metropolis/Germany/Lang/1926: Probably the first dystopian sci-fi movie, certainly the best</font></font></span></div> <div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt"><span lang="EN-CA"><font size="3"><font face="Times New Roman">An andalusian dog/Un chien andalou/France/Bunuel/1929: A dreamlike journey through the subconscious mind of Bunuel (and Dali). The Surrealists were among the first to understand that cinema could be a viable artistic pursuit, worthy of other visual arts </font></font></span></div>[/list]

Faust
09-28-2006, 04:05 PM
I&#39;ve only seen Metropolis out of those. I liked it. It must have been amazing to make something like that in the 20&#39;s.</p>

I must see Cabinet of Dr. Caligari.</p>

</p>


No Battleship Potemkin on your list? [:P]</p>

dontbecruel
09-28-2006, 04:35 PM
And no &quot;Man With A Movie Camera&quot; either. I second Faust&#39;s vote for a bit of Russian 20s cinema to go with the Germans. (Maybe a Buster Keaton movie too)
</p>

mass
09-28-2006, 06:43 PM
outside of japanese & german i have not seen very many pre-war films. do you guys have any recommendations? i have seen man with a movie camera, though.

Faust
09-28-2006, 07:23 PM
outside of japanese &amp; german i have not seen
very many pre-war films. do you guys have any recommendations? i have
seen man with a movie camera, though.</p>

I would recommend Alexander Nevsky http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alexander_Nevsky_%28film%29</p>

Fuuma
09-29-2006, 06:21 PM
I&#39;ve only seen Metropolis out of those. I liked it. It must have been amazing to make something like that in the 20&#39;s.</p>

I must see Cabinet of Dr. Caligari.</p>

</p>


No Battleship Potemkin on your list? [:P]</p>

</p>

Do see Caligari, it has the added bonus of being easily available on DVD and often screened in various cinemas.</p>

As for Eisenstein no Potemkin (hey there&#39;s only 100 slots so loads of great movies will be left out) but there&#39;s one of his movies coming up soon</p>

Faust
09-29-2006, 09:38 PM
Nevsky, Nevsky, Nevsky!!!

mass
10-01-2006, 03:30 AM
thanks for the recommendation. i had the eisenstein boxset which has nevsky although i sold it before i ever got a chance to watch/open it (although i've seen ivan the terrible as well as a few other of his films). i'll check it out!

Fuuma
10-02-2006, 03:25 PM
<u>Fuuma&#39;s top 100 films: 30s</u></p><ul> <div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt"><span lang="EN-CA"><font size="3"><font face="Times New Roman">All Quiet on the Western Front/USA/Milestone/1930: Dramatic anti-war film and a strong indictment of ultra-nationalism, as seen from the German side.</font></font></span></div> <div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt"><span lang="EN-CA"><font size="3"><font face="Times New Roman">M/Germany/Lang/1931: A serial killer is on the loose and the town is in a climate of panic and hysteria after eight children have been found dead. The denunciations, name calling and paranoia present in the film take on an interesting subtext when you consider what was going on in Germany at that time.</font></font></span></div> <div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt"><span lang="EN-CA"><font size="3"><font face="Times New Roman">Atalante, l&#39;/France/Vigo/1934: A story that is at times both humorous and deeply poetic. The association of Vigo, who would die a year after completing his masterpiece (and only feature length film), and the cameramen Boris Kaufman, Dziga Vertov&rsquo;s half-brother, yields results of tremendous evocative power</font></font></span></div> <div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt"><span lang="EN-CA"><font size="3"><font face="Times New Roman">39 steps/UK/Hitchcock/1935: This is one hell of a charming movie. Hitchcock invented the guy&amp;girl (both glamorous of course) who&rsquo;re in trouble with the law/bad guys/etc and must join force to succeed while their mutual contempt and attraction for each other fluctuate according to exterior circumstances. Basically a romantic comedy where the typical obstacles to the protagonists love are replaced by elements taken from thrillers.</font></font></span></div> <div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt"><span lang="EN-CA"><font size="3"><font face="Times New Roman">Grand illusion, the/Grande Illusion, la/France/Renoir/1937: Renoir once again sets his penetrating gaze on the change of class dynamics after WWI, just looming in the horizon in this case, with this tale of French POW planning their escape from German camps</font></font></span></div> <div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt"><span lang="EN-CA"><font size="3"><font face="Times New Roman">Alexander Nevski/URSS/Eisenstein/1938: Made at a time when Russo-Germanic relations weren&rsquo;t at their all time high to say the least, this movie delivers its pro-Russian message with maestria. Observe how clothing, equipment and battle formations, by the judicious use of geometric shapes, contributes to the overall feeling you get from each army. There seems to be a few fans of this one on the board, which is always a sign you&rsquo;re in good company, IMHO</font></font></span></div>[/list]

</p>

xcoldricex
10-02-2006, 09:27 PM
thx 1138 / USA / george lucas / 1971</p>

he did this.. then made star wars? hmm.
</p>

Fuuma
10-03-2006, 10:04 AM
<u>Fuuma&#39;s top 100 movies: 40s</u></p><ul> <div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt"><span lang="EN-CA"><font size="3"><font face="Times New Roman">Maltese falcon, the/USA/Huston/1941: Quintessential noir movie, the shadows in this one owe a lot to the German impressionist films I listed earlier (see 20s)</font></font></span></div> <div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt"><span lang="EN-CA"><font size="3"><font face="Times New Roman">This gun for hire/USA/Tuttle/1942: Veronica Lake and one of the first &ldquo;hitman who finds redemption in the love he has for a woman&rdquo; type of movie that I&rsquo;m a sucker for </font></font></span></div> <div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt"><span lang="EN-CA"><font size="3"><font face="Times New Roman">Corbeau, le/France/Clouzot/1943: Can be seen as a metaphor for occupied France (made and released during said occupation) oh and Clouzot is the French Hitchcock</font></font></span></div> <div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt"><span lang="EN-CA"><font size="3"><font face="Times New Roman">Beauty and the beast\Belle et la b&ecirc;te, la/France/Cocteau/1946: The only movie on the list that I haven&rsquo;t seen since I was a kid, this one is so poetic and aesthetically pleasing that it left a really strong impression on me at the time. A friend of mine later said that he can&rsquo;t stand the movie because Cocteau was so in love with Marais during the filming that he made everyone else ugly by comparison. I&rsquo;ll tell you what I think about that when I re-watch it, I wasn&rsquo;t looking for homo-erotic subtexts in movies when I was eight, and that&rsquo;s a good thing. </font></font></span></div> <div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt"><span lang="EN-CA"><font size="3"><font face="Times New Roman">Out of the past/USA/Tourneur/1947 :<span> </span>Another noir with a femme fatale so wicked you can&rsquo;t help but love her. Featuring Kirk Douglas in a career defining first(?) role</font></font></span></div> <div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt"><span lang="EN-CA"><font size="3"><font face="Times New Roman">Bicycle thief, the/Italie/DeSica/1948: Moving, humane, essential</font></font></span></div> <div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt"><span lang="EN-CA"><font size="3"><font face="Times New Roman">Third man, the/UK/Reed/1949 : Just a great thriller, a famous cuckoo speech and one of the best, again German impressionism inspired, use of shadows ever (see the last scene).</font></font></span></div>[/list]

</p>

Faust
10-03-2006, 10:40 AM
I figured you meant &quot;40s&quot; - I fixed it in the title. Added &quot;Bicycle Thief&quot; - my Netflix cue is getting dangerously long thanks to you [Y]

Faust
10-03-2006, 11:23 AM
Paging Fuuma - is Great Gatsby with Redford/Farrow on your list? I am buying a few movies (cheap), and it&#39;s one of the two decent ones I found.

Fuuma
10-03-2006, 12:21 PM
Paging Fuuma - is Great Gatsby with Redford/Farrow on your list? I am buying a few movies (cheap), and it&#39;s one of the two decent ones I found.
</p>

I&#39;ve never seen it....</p>

Oh and there are hundreds of movies I like that aren&#39;t on this list.</p>

</p>

Good call on the bicycle thief, I&#39;m sure you&#39;ll enjoy it, especially if you liked other neorealist movies (i.e. rome open city)</p>

mass
10-03-2006, 03:15 PM
i love this gun for hire, as you might imagine. good pick, among all the others on your list.



by the way, since you're only picking one film from any director for the list, are the films on the list your favorite from that particular director? ie maltest falcon is your favorite huston? i mean for me a favorite film 'of all time' may not be my favorite in the context of only the director's films (and that also, is completely separate from what i would think is his/her best work, etc)... so i'm just curious.

Fuuma
10-04-2006, 12:17 PM
i love this gun for hire, as you might imagine. good pick, among all the others on your list.

by the way, since you&#39;re only picking one film from any director for the list, are the films on the list your favorite from that particular director? ie maltest falcon is your favorite huston? i mean for me a favorite film &#39;of all time&#39; may not be my favorite in the context of only the director&#39;s films (and that also, is completely separate from what i would think is his/her best work, etc)... so i&#39;m just curious.</p><p class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt"><span lang="EN-CA" style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Arial">Clarification: I&rsquo;ve included two films by the same director a couple of times&hellip;.maybe I should revise the list and change my criteria to only one film per director. Anyway when you&rsquo;re making such a list a little bit of cheating never hurts.</span></p><p class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt"><span lang="EN-CA" style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Arial"></span></p><p class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt"><span lang="EN-CA" style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Arial">I didn&rsquo;t rationalize the list to the point you describe (pitting best of all time VS my favourite VS best considering the director&rsquo;s canon), whenever I think of a film or director I&rsquo;ll just throw around those I like the most or are more important/relevant to me. Sometimes I&rsquo;ll have the excruciating pain of choosing, for example, which Wong-Kar-Wai stays in and which stays out, I don&rsquo;t even remember the ones I&rsquo;ve kept, could be any among Days of being wild, ashes of time, Chungking express, Fallen angels, Happy together or In the mood for love. There are of course loads of omissions and I could certainly do another top100 without including any of the ones in this list. Those were just easier to choose/bring back to memory because they&rsquo;re mostly from my DVD collection or watching journal (started pretty recently-jan 2005). There is also some sort of dreamlike associative logic where I&rsquo;ll think about a film which for some reason will evoke another, leading me in turn to the next one.</span></p>

</p>

Fuuma
10-04-2006, 12:36 PM
<u>Fuuma&#39;s top 100 movies: 50s</u></p><ul> <div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt"><span lang="EN-CA"><font size="3"><font face="Times New Roman">Rashomon/Japan/Kurosawa/1950: Well known for its use of contradicting flashbacks. The long take where the woodsman is walking through the forest is the perfect example of music, camerawork and previous narrative drive coming together in a magical moment (even though it&rsquo;s just a dude walking through the woods)</font></font></span></div> <div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt"><font size="3"><font face="Times New Roman"><span lang="EN-CA">Tokyo</span><span lang="EN-CA"> story/Japan/Ozu/1953: Very clich&eacute; choice but this is so moving and affecting I had to include it</span></font></font></div> <div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt"><span lang="EN-CA"><font size="3"><font face="Times New Roman">Touchez pas au grisbi<span> </span>France/Becker<span> </span>/1954: Another great heist/crime flick with Jean Gabin</font></font></span></div> <div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt"><span lang="EN-CA"><font size="3"><font face="Times New Roman">Seven samurai, the/Japan/Kurosawa/1954: Kurosawa shows such a mastery of movement; the quintessential &ldquo;action&rdquo; film</font></font></span></div> <div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt"><span lang="EN-CA"><font size="3"><font face="Times New Roman">Diabolique/Diaboliques, les/France/Clouzot<span> </span>/1955: Another gripping Clouzot thriller, this one has lost none of its punch. Hitchcock liked it so much he asked the authors (Boileau/Narcejac) of the original story to write something for him which resulted in Vertigo.</font></font></span></div> <div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt"><span lang="EN-CA"><font face="Times New Roman" size="3"></font></span><span lang="EN-CA"><font size="3"><font face="Times New Roman">Rififi/Rififi chez les hommes, du/France/Dassin/1955: Classic long heist sequence, uninterrupted by music or speech, which would inspire countless directors (and real life criminals) in years to come </font></font></span></div> <div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt"><span lang="EN-CA"><font size="3"><font face="Times New Roman">Bob le flambeur/France/Melville/1955: Great morality tale about gangster honour, luck and getting older. The street sequences are exquisite and definitely inspired the new wave directors who started shooting on location, with natural light and portable cameras. </font></font></span></div> <div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt"><span lang="EN-CA"><font size="3"><font face="Times New Roman">Night and fog/Nuit et brouillard/France/Resnais/1955: 30 Min documentary about the Holocaust (among the first ones made), might be less graphic than some but the quality of the direction and narration makes it all the more effecting</font></font></span></div> <div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt"><span lang="EN-CA"><font size="3"><font face="Times New Roman">A man escaped/Un condamn&eacute; &agrave; mort s&#39;est &eacute;chapp&eacute;/France/Bresson/1956: Bresson&rsquo;s minimalist, almost ascetic vision of cinema shines through in this tale of quiet perseverance.</font></font></span></div> <div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt"><span lang="EN-CA"><font size="3"><font face="Times New Roman">Paths of Glory<span> </span>/USA/Kubrick/1957: This, and all quiet on the western front, are my favourite (anti) war movies. Oh and it&rsquo;s the only Kubrick film on the list.</font></font></span></div> <div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt"><span lang="EN-CA" style="color: black"><font face="Times New Roman" size="3">Vertigo/USA/Hitchcock/1958: The most personal of Hitchcock&rsquo;s movies, the tale of a man who obsessively tries to transform a woman into something else (a physical projection of his own fantasies) to the point of obliterating her own identity. Everything is twisted and spiralling in this film, from staircases and roads to the heroine&rsquo;s hairdo.</font></span><span lang="EN-CA"></span></div>[/list]

</p>

mass
10-04-2006, 02:11 PM
eventually i would love to see a (for example) top 10 list of favorite films & filmmakers from everybody...!

just the mention of riffifi puts that song right back in my head...

Fuuma
10-05-2006, 01:19 PM
eventually i would love to see a (for example) top 10 list of favorite films &amp; filmmakers from everybody...! just the mention of riffifi puts that song right back in my head...</p>

Just ten films doesn&#39;t say much about someone, but add some thematic elements and then the top 10s become quite fun. This can be quite poetic and evocative &quot;top 10 films you think about when I saybodies&quot; or specific &quot;best 10 movies with car accidents&quot; or even genre/period related &quot;ten best french new wave&quot;. Rififi=pure magic, theoriginal french title sounds a lot more macho (I guess it could be translatedas&quot;battle among men&quot; or something of that nature, rififi=old slang for battle, conflict, confrontation, chaos, etc.)though, which is good in that case.</p>

</p>

Fuuma
10-05-2006, 01:23 PM
<u>Fuuma&#39;s top 100 movies: 60s</u></p><ul type="disc"><li class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt; color: black; tab-stops: list 36.0pt"><font size="3"><font face="Times New Roman">Breathless/&Agrave; bout de souffle/France/Godard/1960: Frantic, fun, irreverential, innovative. <span lang="EN-CA">It&rsquo;s a monument but without any of the pomposity associated with that concept.</span></font></font><span lang="EN-CA" style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Verdana"> </span><li class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt; color: black; tab-stops: list 36.0pt"><font face="Times New Roman"><span lang="EN-CA"><font size="3">Avventura, l&#39;/Italy/Antonioni/1960: This could be called sex and architecture, the attention given to bodies, shapes and forms is amazing. So modern in its aesthetic and mindset, pretty much everything else looks dated when compared to it. </font></span><span lang="EN-CA" style="font-size: 10pt">&ldquo;-Godard: The drama is no longer psychological, but plastic.-Antonioni: It&#39;s the same thing&rdquo; (okay this conversation was about Red Desert but still&hellip;)</span></font><span lang="EN-CA" style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Verdana"> </span><li class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt; color: black; tab-stops: list 36.0pt"><font size="3"><font face="Times New Roman"><span lang="EN-CA">Dolce vita, la/Italy/Fellini/1960: So stylish </span><span lang="EN-CA" style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Verdana"></span></font></font><li class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt; color: black; tab-stops: list 36.0pt"><span lang="EN-CA"><font face="Times New Roman" size="3">Last year at Marienbad/L&rsquo;ann&eacute;e derni&egrave;re &agrave; Marienbad/France/Resnais/1961: Not so much a logical film as one made to evoke concepts and memories. A great discussion starter, you can talk about it&rsquo;s meaning for hours after a viewing</font></span><span lang="EN-CA" style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Verdana"> </span><li class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt; color: black; tab-stops: list 36.0pt"><span lang="EN-CA"><font face="Times New Roman" size="3">Leopard, the/Italy/Visconti/1963: The last days of the aristocratic era made by a communist prince, who, by virtue of his dual nature, conveys the right mix of hope and melancholy</font></span><span lang="EN-CA" style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Verdana"> </span><li class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt; color: black; tab-stops: list 36.0pt"><span lang="EN-CA"><font face="Times New Roman" size="3">Band of outsiders/Bande &agrave; part/France/Godard/1964: Godard successfully re-arranges the polar for his own device</font></span><span lang="EN-CA" style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Verdana"> </span><li class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt; color: black; tab-stops: list 36.0pt"><span lang="EN-CA"><font face="Times New Roman" size="3">Woman in the dunes/Japan/Teshigahara/1964: The most tactile film I&rsquo;ve ever seen and a powerful existentialist allegory.</font></span><span lang="EN-CA" style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Verdana"> </span><li class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt; color: black; tab-stops: list 36.0pt"><font size="3"><font face="Times New Roman"><span lang="EN-CA">Battle of Algiers, theAlgeria/Pontecorvo/1965: At times you feel like you&rsquo;re watching a documentary. I attended a screening where a couple of the actors where present (some of them are now important members of the Algerian government) and they were basically playing themselves, blurring the line between reality and fiction. This is essential viewing in these times of terrorism hysteria </span><span lang="EN-CA" style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Verdana"></span></font></font><li class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt; color: black; tab-stops: list 36.0pt"><span lang="EN-CA"><font face="Times New Roman" size="3">Blow-up/Italy/Antonioni/1966: Swinging London meet Antonioni&rsquo;s take on reality and bourgeois existential ennui. Asks a lot of interesting questions about art, representation and truth.</font></span><span lang="EN-CA" style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Verdana"> </span><li class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt; color: black; tab-stops: list 36.0pt"><span lang="EN-CA"><font face="Times New Roman" size="3">Persona/Sweden/Bergman/1966: If you&rsquo;re interested in the nature of identity and individuality see this. </font></span><span lang="EN-CA" style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Verdana"><span></span></span><li class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt; color: black; tab-stops: list 36.0pt"><font size="3"><font face="Times New Roman"><span lang="EN-CA">Belle de jour/France/Bunuel/1967: Threads the murkier depths of human sexuality </span><span lang="EN-CA" style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Verdana"></span></font></font><li class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt; color: black; tab-stops: list 36.0pt"><span lang="EN-CA"><font face="Times New Roman" size="3">Samourai, le/France/Melville/1967: Delon is the height of laconic cool in this, Melville&rsquo;s hieratic characters, reminiscent of the style of Bresson, seem to be unable or unwilling to escape the highly codified destinies the filmmaker has in store for them</font></span><span lang="EN-CA" style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Verdana"> </span><li class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt; color: black; tab-stops: list 36.0pt"><span lang="EN-CA"><font face="Times New Roman" size="3">Stolen kisses/Bais&eacute;s vol&eacute;s/France/Truffaut/1968: Breezy and fun without being inconsequential. Every man can recognize at least part of himself in eternal adolescent Antoine Doinel</font></span><span lang="EN-CA" style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Verdana"> </span><li class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt; color: black; tab-stops: list 36.0pt"><span lang="EN-CA"><font face="Times New Roman" size="3">Once upon a time in the west/Italy/Leone/1968: The western to end all westerns, so epic it hasn&rsquo;t been topped yet.</font></span><span lang="EN-CA" style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Verdana"> </span><li class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt; color: black; tab-stops: list 36.0pt"><span lang="EN-CA"><font face="Times New Roman" size="3">Unfaithful one, the/Femme infid&egrave;le, la/France/Chabrol/1969: Had to pick a Chabrol, any number of his movies could have been included. Chabrol is the master of thrillers illustrating the &ldquo;bourgeois malaise&rdquo;</font></span><span lang="EN-CA" style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Verdana"> </span><li class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt; color: black; tab-stops: list 36.0pt"><span lang="EN-CA"><font face="Times New Roman" size="3">Z/France/Costa-Gavras/1969: Major entry in the political film genre</font></span><span lang="EN-CA" style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Verdana"> </span><li class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt; color: black; tab-stops: list 36.0pt"><span lang="EN-CA"><font face="Times New Roman" size="3">My night at Maud&#39;s/Ma nuit chez Maud/France/Rohmer/1969: Be warned that Rohmer&rsquo;s movies are ultra talkative and unabashedly intellectual (that&rsquo;s a good thing, right?) but the ethical dilemmas he poses are always fascinating</font></span><span lang="EN-CA" style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Verdana"></span>[/list]

Faust
10-05-2006, 01:39 PM
This is awesome. I&#39;ve only seen La Dolce Vita and Persona out of these. Must add Battle of Algiers.

mass
10-05-2006, 03:41 PM
60s and 70s are when most of my favorite films are from, looking forward to the rest of the list! the only film i haven't seen there is last night at marienbad so i will definitely check it out.



faust you should check out the leopard, i think you may like it. actually i don't know if you will since i don't know what your taste is... but it's great and the set/costumes are very epic. it's famous for a ballroom scene butttt there is a scene early in the film that imo is a perfect scene... uhm i don't really know how to describe it but it's right after the war and the camera just goes through all the people sitting still during the ceremony or whatever. god i'm inarticulate. fuuma do you know which scene i'm talking about?



btw there aren't enough american films on your list :D

Fuuma
10-05-2006, 09:55 PM
60s and 70s are when most of my favorite films are from, looking forward to the rest of the list! the only film i haven&#39;t seen there is last night at marienbad so i will definitely check it out.

faust you should check out the leopard, i think you may like it. actually i don&#39;t know if you will since i don&#39;t know what your taste is... but it&#39;s great and the set/costumes are very epic. it&#39;s famous for a ballroom scene butttt there is a scene early in the film that imo is a perfect scene... uhm i don&#39;t really know how to describe it but it&#39;s right after the war and the camera just goes through all the people sitting still during the ceremony or whatever. god i&#39;m inarticulate. fuuma do you know which scene i&#39;m talking about?

btw there aren&#39;t enough american films on your list :D</p>

I&#39;m also quite partial to the 60s and 70s...</p>

Definitely check Las year at Marienbad, particularly if you&#39;re interested in &quot;nouveau roman&quot;, the scenario is by Alain Robbe-Grillet.</p>

I should re-watch the Leopard, haven&#39;t seen it in a while, do you mean a scene that comes right after the very animated scene where Tancrede (Delon) participates in active combat?</p>

You&#39;re right about the lack of american films, I just noticed there are none in the 60s, gotta say there&#39;s a total of 18/100 though....</p>

Jorge Hache
10-06-2006, 02:37 PM
Godard, Antonioni, Fellini, Bu&ntilde;uel, Bergman, Chabrol....the sixties were really an interesting decade defining cinema and redefining it&#39;s boundaries, at least 5 of the movies in the list are all time favouritesof mine(an certainly in my beloved dvd&#39;s collection), can&#39;t wait to see the 70&#39;s one, thnx fumma</p>

Fuuma
10-06-2006, 09:41 PM
Godard, Antonioni, Fellini, Bu&ntilde;uel, Bergman, Chabrol....the sixties were really an interesting decade defining cinema and redefining it&#39;s boundaries, at least 5 of the movies in the list are all time favouritesof mine(an certainly in my beloved dvd&#39;s collection), can&#39;t wait to see the 70&#39;s one, thnx fumma</p>

</p>

Glad to see another fan of the list of directors you mentionned. By the way which 5 movies are among your favorites?</p>

<u>Fuuma&#39;s top 100 movies: 70s</u></p><ul style="margin-top: 0cm" type="disc"><li class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt; tab-stops: list 36.0pt"><span lang="EN-CA"><font size="3"><font face="Times New Roman">Get carter/UK/Hodges/1971: Hard hitting hard-boiled action/thriller with Michael Caine who displays serious acting chops</font></font></span><li class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt; tab-stops: list 36.0pt"><span lang="EN-CA"><font size="3"><font face="Times New Roman">Aguirre, the wrath of god/Germany/Herzog/1972: Herzog characters are always on the brink of madness as they vainly grasp at something beyond the reach of Man.</font></font></span><li class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt; tab-stops: list 36.0pt"><span lang="EN-CA"><font size="3"><font face="Times New Roman">Money Money Money/Aventure c&#39;est l&#39;aventure, L&#39;/France/Lelouch/1972: Very funny film about a bunch of gangsters who take advantage of the 70s political instability to further their monetary interests. Watch out for the Stalin Ferrari jokes.</font></font></span><li class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt; tab-stops: list 36.0pt"><span lang="EN-CA"><font size="3"><font face="Times New Roman">Godfather, the<span> </span>/USA/Coppola/1972: Everybody has seen this&hellip;</font></font></span><li class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt; tab-stops: list 36.0pt"><span lang="EN-CA"><font size="3"><font face="Times New Roman">Magnificent one, the/Magnifique, le/France/DeBroca/1973: The ancestor to all those whacked out spy comedies (see Austin powers). This is a personal favourite but be warned that I like Belmondo in anything, even when he&rsquo;s over-acting like crazy</font></font></span><li class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt; tab-stops: list 36.0pt"><span lang="EN-CA"><font size="3"><font face="Times New Roman">Mother and the whore, the/Maman et la putain, la/France/Eustache/1973: Eustache truly is a children of the new wave and this film about post may 68 relationships is as good as any of the major entries in the new wave canon</font></font></span><li class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt; tab-stops: list 36.0pt"><span lang="EN-CA"><font size="3"><font face="Times New Roman">Mad adventures of rabbi Jacob, the/Aventures de rabbi Jacob, les/France/Oury/1973: &ldquo;Salomon, but you&rsquo;re a jew!!??&rdquo; says the main character to his driver, DeFunes is hilarious and this film is a good showcase for his physical brand of humour. Pretty low brow but always hilarious</font></font></span><li class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt; tab-stops: list 36.0pt"><span lang="EN-CA"><font size="3"><font face="Times New Roman">Day for night/Nuit am&eacute;ricaine, la/France/Truffaut/1973: Truffaut&rsquo;s love of cinema shines through in this film. I love how all the characters are so enthusiastic about the decidedly mediocre movie they&rsquo;re making. </font></font></span><li class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt; tab-stops: list 36.0pt"><span lang="EN-CA"><font size="3"><font face="Times New Roman">Long goodbye, the/USA/Altman/1973: A classic noir novel meets 70s Californian indolence</font></font></span><li class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt; tab-stops: list 36.0pt"><span lang="EN-CA"><font size="3"><font face="Times New Roman">Enter the dragon/USA/Clouse/1973: That&rsquo;s some kickass kung fu, Bruce Lee can only play Bruce Lee but he does it with so much charisma it doesn&rsquo;t matter</font></font></span><li class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt; tab-stops: list 36.0pt"><span lang="EN-CA"><font size="3"><font face="Times New Roman">Going places/Valseuses, les/France/Blier/1974: The original (French) title is slang for testicles and this road movie about masculinity, youth and all around male anarchistic behaviour spares no one along it&rsquo;s joyous course. Blier would later make one about the more feminine side of men with &ldquo;Tenue de soir&eacute;e&rdquo;.</font></font></span><li class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt; tab-stops: list 36.0pt"><span lang="EN-CA"><font size="3"><font face="Times New Roman">Godfather part II/USA/Coppola/1974: Everybody has also seen this&hellip;</font></font></span><li class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt; tab-stops: list 36.0pt"><span lang="EN-CA"><font size="3"><font face="Times New Roman">Chinatown/USA/Polanski/1974: Another 70s take on noir, one of the great roles of Nicholson.</font></font></span><li class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt; tab-stops: list 36.0pt"><span lang="EN-CA"><font size="3"><font face="Times New Roman">Graveyard of honor/Japan/Fukasaku/1975: Filmed in a gritty, documentary style, this movie presents a character consumed by an inextinguishable lust for (self) destruction. Like many of Fukasaku&rsquo;s movies the focus is on post WWII Japanese life among the many individuals destabilized by that period.<span> </span></font></font></span><li class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt; tab-stops: list 36.0pt"><span lang="EN-CA"><font size="3"><font face="Times New Roman">Taxi driver/USA/Scorsese/1976: Shots of the city at night are impressive. This movie makes you think about what we, as viewers, are really asking for when we want the main character to give us the &ldquo;pay off&rdquo;.</font></font></span><li class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt; tab-stops: list 36.0pt"><span lang="EN-CA"><font size="3"><font face="Times New Roman">Annie Hall/USA/Allen/1977: The quintessential Allen movie, it&rsquo;s hard not to love Annie Hall</font></font></span>[/list]

dontbecruel
10-07-2006, 04:35 AM
I love Altman but I especially LOVE the Long Goodbye. Particularly for the crazy experimental sound recording and the way the theme song reappears in different guises everywhere Marlow goes.</p>

Great choice! Most people pick McCabe and Mrs Miller or Nashville, which are both amazing but...</p>

mass
10-07-2006, 05:48 AM
i'd probably go with 3 women.

dontbecruel
10-07-2006, 07:57 AM
i&#39;d probably go with 3 women.</p>

I&#39;m crazy about that one too. He made so many fascinating films in the 70s. What about that gambling one, Brewster McCloud, or whatever it&#39;s called, or Buffalo Bill and the Indians, or A wedding? And they&#39;re just his minor films!</p>

Jorge Hache
10-07-2006, 02:13 PM
Hi Fumma</p>

Of your 60&#39;s list i love </p><p class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt"><span style="color: black"><font size="3"><font face="Times New Roman">Breathless</font></font></span></p><p class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt"><span style="color: black"><font size="3"><font face="Times New Roman">Band of outsiders</font></font></span></p><p class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt"><span style="color: black"><font size="3"><font face="Times New Roman">Blow-up</font></font></span></p><p class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt"><span style="color: black"><font size="3"><font face="Times New Roman">Belle de jour</font></font></span></p><p class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt"><span style="color: black"><font face="Times New Roman" size="3">Once upon a time in the west</font></span></p>

La dolce vita is a great movie also</p>

Fuuma
10-08-2006, 07:50 PM
Hi Fumma</p>

Of your 60&#39;s list i love </p><p class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt"><span style="color: black"><font size="3"><font face="Times New Roman">Breathless</font></font></span></p><p class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt"><span style="color: black"><font size="3"><font face="Times New Roman">Band of outsiders</font></font></span></p><p class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt"><span style="color: black"><font size="3"><font face="Times New Roman">Blow-up</font></font></span></p><p class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt"><span style="color: black"><font size="3"><font face="Times New Roman">Belle de jour</font></font></span></p><p class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt"><span style="color: black"><font face="Times New Roman" size="3">Once upon a time in the west</font></span></p>

La dolce vita is a great movie also</p>

</p>

</p>

Nice.</p>

Fuuma
10-08-2006, 07:57 PM
<u>Fuuma&#39;s top 100 movies: 80s</u></p><ul style="margin-top: 0cm" type="disc"><li class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt; tab-stops: list 36.0pt"><span lang="EN-CA"><font size="3"><font face="Times New Roman">Choice of arms/Choix des armes, le/France/Corneau/1981: Classic post ww2 French gangster (Montand) meets the new breed of 80s disenfranchised small time street thug (Depardieu). Corneau manages to make a film that is both a confrontation between two genres of filmmaking/characters and a compelling story with well developed protagonists</font></font></span><li class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt; tab-stops: list 36.0pt"><span lang="EN-CA"><font size="3"><font face="Times New Roman">Under suspicion/Garde &agrave; vue/France/Miller/1981: Intimist drama between a tough cop (Ventura) and a disenchanted bourgeois suspect (Serrault)</font></font></span><li class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt; tab-stops: list 36.0pt"><span lang="EN-CA"><font size="3"><font face="Times New Roman">Clean slate/Coup de torchon/France/Tavernier/1981: An American noir novel transposed to the French African colonies and masterfully directed by Tavernier. Violence and evil was never this banal and friendly</font></font></span><li class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt; tab-stops: list 36.0pt"><span lang="EN-CA"><font size="3"><font face="Times New Roman">Knock on wood/Ch&egrave;vre, la/France/Veber/1981: Hilarious buddy film where Depardieu plays straight man to funnyman Richard&rsquo;s pathetically unlucky looser.</font></font></span><li class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt; tab-stops: list 36.0pt"><span lang="EN-CA"><font size="3"><font face="Times New Roman">My dinner with Andre/USA/Malle/1981: Just two guys talking during a restaurant meal, doesn&rsquo;t sound like much but you&rsquo;ll be impressed. </font></font></span><li class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt; tab-stops: list 36.0pt"><span lang="EN-CA"><font size="3"><font face="Times New Roman">Blade runner/USA/Scott/1982: Thought provoking, visually impressive and aiming at making us think about the actual world we live in, this is sci-fi at its best.</font></font></span><li class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt; tab-stops: list 36.0pt"><span lang="EN-CA"><font size="3"><font face="Times New Roman">To our loves/&Agrave; nos amours/France/Pialat/1983: Pialat&rsquo;s cinematic style is a mixture of documentary realism tampered by a painter&rsquo;s eye. This is now available on DVD (criterion) and the extras really give an insight into his filmmaking process</font></font></span><li class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt; tab-stops: list 36.0pt"><span lang="EN-CA"><font size="3"><font face="Times New Roman">Sans soleil/France/Marker/1983: A cinematic essay (how rare is this?!) on time, space and the cultural landscape. Marker is truly an innovative filmmaker, I&rsquo;d be hard pressed to compare him to anyone else</font></font></span><li class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt; tab-stops: list 36.0pt"><span lang="EN-CA"><font size="3"><font face="Times New Roman">Paris, Texas/Germany/Wenders/1984: A haunting road movie, set in America, made by a German.</font></font></span><li class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt; tab-stops: list 36.0pt"><span lang="EN-CA"><font size="3"><font face="Times New Roman">Betty blue/37,2 le matin/France/Beinex/1986: Great adaptation of an amazing book. </font></font></span><li class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt; tab-stops: list 36.0pt"><span lang="EN-CA"><font size="3"><font face="Times New Roman">Last emperor, the/Italy/Bertolucci/1987: Saw this in 87 (when I was a kid) and have been in awe of the movie ever since. A sprawling epic</font></font></span><li class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt; tab-stops: list 36.0pt"><span lang="EN-CA"><font size="3"><font face="Times New Roman">Akira/Japan/Otomo/1988: An absolute classic of the cyberpunk AND animation genres. </font></font></span><li class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt; tab-stops: list 36.0pt"><span lang="EN-CA"><font size="3"><font face="Times New Roman">Killer, the/HK<span> </span>Woo/1989: Bullet ballet and melodramatic heroism at it&rsquo;s best, this movie owes a lot to Le Samourai (see 60s on my list). </font></font></span><li class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt; tab-stops: list 36.0pt"><span lang="EN-CA"><font size="3"><font face="Times New Roman">Kiki&rsquo;s delivery service/Japan/Miyazaki/1989: Had to have one Miyazaki in there, perfect if you have kids, perfect if you don&rsquo;t. This one is truly endearing and covers all the classic Miyazaki themes: flight, coming of age, love, magic/the mystical world, old European architecture. You have to marvel at the way the characters move, perfectly evoking human mannerisms</font></font></span><li class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt; tab-stops: list 36.0pt"><span lang="EN-CA"><font size="3"><font face="Times New Roman">Crimes and misdemeanors/USA/Allen/1989: This one asks very serious questions about guilt and the consequences of your actions, all wrapped up in Allen&rsquo;s usual brand of self-deprecating humour</font></font></span><li class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt; tab-stops: list 36.0pt"><span lang="EN-CA"><font size="3"><font face="Times New Roman">Do the right thing/USA/Lee/1989: The look is firmly set in the 80s but the story concerning racism is anything but dated. I like how Lee manages to give a convincing performance in his own movie, something few directors accomplish. </font></font></span>[/list]

Fuuma
10-10-2006, 01:46 PM
<u>Fuuma&#39;s top 100 movies: 90s</u></p>

</p><ul style="margin-top: 0cm" type="disc"><li class="MsoNormal"><span lang="EN-CA">Goodfellas/USA/Scorsese/1990:
The camera sweeps and turns to make us part of a mafia crew for a few
exhilarating decades.</span><li class="MsoNormal"><span lang="EN-CA">Man bites dog/C&#39;est arriv&eacute; pr&egrave;s
de chez-vous/Belgium/Belvaux/Ponzel/Poelvoorde/1992: A black comedy about
the relationship between observer and subject, in this case illustrated by
watching a fake documentary crew as they follow and get gradually more
involved, with a psychopathic thief </span><li class="MsoNormal"><span lang="EN-CA">Hard Boiled/HK/Woo/1992: The
most impressive pure action movie I&rsquo;ve ever seen, the final showdown in
the hospital is masterful</span><li class="MsoNormal"><span lang="EN-CA">Farewell my
concubine/Chine/Kaige/1993: A magnificent walk through Chinese
transformation during the 20<sup>th</sup> century and probably Leslie
Cheung&rsquo;s greatest performance</span><li class="MsoNormal"><span lang="EN-CA">Three colors: Blue/Trois
couleurs: Bleu/France/Kieslowski/1993: Binoche shows great skill in
approaching this difficult role, the tints and images are gorgeous and
this re-interpretation of the three colors of the French flag
(blue=liberty) take on a whole different meaning. </span><span lang="EN-CA">Liberty</span><span lang="EN-CA"> is used here in the sense of
severing all points of contact with pain and social interaction, after the
death of a loved one.</span><li class="MsoNormal"><span lang="EN-CA">Exotica/Canada/Egoyan/1994: A
movie about a strip club that is neither vulgar nor about sexuality/money,
but concerns remembrance, guilt and parenthood, no really</span><li class="MsoNormal"><span lang="EN-CA">Three colors: Red/Trois
couleurs: Rouge/France/Kieslowski/1994: the final chapter of the
trilogy, Kieslowski&rsquo;s fascination with chance encounters is made
especially interesting by the great ending.</span><li class="MsoNormal"><span lang="EN-CA">Chungking</span><span lang="EN-CA"> express/HK/Wong/1994: The
lives of 20-something aimless characters intersect amid a thoroughly
modern urbanity in these two mingled love stories. Wong-Kar-Wai film uses
saturated colors and freeze frame to elevate these glimpses into
instantaneity into moments to be remembered.</span><li class="MsoNormal"><span lang="EN-CA">Hate/Haine,
la/France/Kassovitz/1995: Another great film about racism, this one has a
B&amp;W documentary feel and some natural acting that makes it a pleasure
to watch</span><li class="MsoNormal"><span lang="EN-CA">Maborosi/Japon/Kore-eda/1995: A
meditation on loss. The character arc of the main character, told in
images and through mostly silent acting, is what makes this movie
incredible</span><li class="MsoNormal"><span lang="EN-CA">Ridicule/France/Leconte/1996: a
western, set in 18 century </span><span lang="EN-CA">France</span><span lang="EN-CA">, where duels aren&rsquo;t fought
with guns but words (I&rsquo;m paraphrasing something Ebert said about the
movie)</span><li class="MsoNormal"><span lang="EN-CA">Made in Hong Kong/HK/Chan/1997:
Chan movies are mainly concerned with the relationship between </span><span lang="EN-CA">Hong Kong</span><span lang="EN-CA"> and the mainland and what it
entails in term of identity</span><li class="MsoNormal"><span lang="EN-CA">Hana-bi/Japon/Kitano/1997:<span> </span>A contemplative and poetic film
punctuated by disturbing explosions of violence</span><li class="MsoNormal"><span lang="EN-CA">Cure/Japon/Kurosawa
(Kiyoshi)/1997: Kurosawa has made a name for himself crafting existentialist
horror films that owe as much to Sartre as to traditional b-movie fare.</span><li class="MsoNormal"><span lang="EN-CA">Mission</span><span lang="EN-CA">, the/HK/To/1999: IMHO the 90s
were </span><span lang="EN-CA">Hong
Kong</span><span lang="EN-CA">&rsquo;s
cinematic decade and this movie, courtesy of the very innovative Milky
Way&rsquo;s studio head Johnnie To, ends those years with a bang; a quirky,
offbeat, character driven gangster movie that goes everywhere but where
you most expect it.</span>[/list]



</p>

Faust
10-10-2006, 02:32 PM
The Red, Blue, White trilogy is awesome. I had the Blue poster on my kitchen wall for a long time. Oh, and I must buy Kiki&#39;s Delivery Service for my daughter.</p>

Great list, Fuuma. I&#39;m just happy there are no Jarmush films on it - I think he is nothing but hype.</p>

I was a little surprised that you have neither Reservoir Dogs nor Pulp Fiction on your list!</p>

Fuuma
10-10-2006, 04:04 PM
The Red, Blue, White trilogy is awesome. I had the Blue poster on my kitchen wall for a long time. Oh, and I must buy Kiki&#39;s Delivery Service for my daughter.</p>

Great list, Fuuma. I&#39;m just happy there are no Jarmush films on it - I think he is nothing but hype.</p>

I was a little surprised that you have neither Reservoir Dogs nor Pulp Fiction on your list!</p>

</p>

Kieslowski has really built a world of his own, dominated by happenstance and grand meaning given to personal gestures. As for Kiki and other Miyazaki, well kids usually love them so good idea.</p>

I actually like Jarmusch, like a recently posted (on tfs I think) I think he brings his own skewed vision to everyday situations and I appreciate that. I also share his new wave sensibilities. Same thing for Tarantino, I definitely liked some, if not all, of his movies.</p>

dontbecruel
10-10-2006, 04:12 PM
Glad there&#39;s a Miyazaki on your list. I think all of his films apart from Howl are among the best of the past 20 years. Even when you go back to his early TV shorts like Panda KoPanda, he has a beautiful vision. He really reminds me of Yohji&#39;s remark that fashion is about &quot;designing time&quot;. His imagination is populated by things as various as aeroplanes from the 1930s, European buildings from the 18th century, the Japanese countryside of his youth, the way that a certain girl of a certain age plays. These all take on a new meaning once they are recreated in a new space in time. And they will create a new kind of beauty again when the films are watched in 100 years.

mass
10-10-2006, 05:11 PM
suprised there is no tarkovsky...

good call on the fruit chan picture.

Jorge Hache
10-10-2006, 08:05 PM
Glad to see Atom Egoyan in the list, movies like Exotica or Sweet Hereafter are among my favourites, he can portrait really quirky or disfuctional characters (more humanly and emotional) in a better way than any director of his genetation, way less hype than Jarmusch or Tarantino but more rewarding and provocative.</p>

Jorge Hache
10-10-2006, 08:12 PM
Kitano and Kieslowski are also personal favourites, the Three Colors Trilogy is great but some of their early movieslike Blind Chance (which inspired movies likeTykwer&#39;s Run Lola Run) are worth seeing too.</p>

</p>

mass
10-10-2006, 09:15 PM
i think egoyan often gets overlooked because he's canadian.

love kieslowski... the decalogue was actually my introduction to him. oh dear...

Faust
10-10-2006, 09:17 PM
suprised there is no tarkovsky...

good call on the fruit chan picture.</p>

Oh,
yea, good call. I would think that he is a fairly narrow figure
in what he does. His films are so powerful, but you really need
to follow the closely, which can get difficult because they are so
sparse.</p>

Fuuma
10-11-2006, 12:16 PM
<p class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt; tab-stops: list 36.0pt"><font size="3"><font face="Times New Roman"><span lang="EN-CA"><u>Fuuma&#39;s top 100 movies: 2000s</u></span></font></font></p><ul style="margin-top: 0cm" type="disc"><li class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt; tab-stops: list 36.0pt"><font size="3"><font face="Times New Roman"><span lang="EN-CA">Code Unknown/Code inconnu/France/Haneke/2000: Haneke&rsquo;s masterful film on the new </span><span lang="EN-CA">Europe</span><span lang="EN-CA"> and its impact on various ethnic groups, the movie also explores communication dynamics and mixed messages. The disjointed, unfinished scenes really add something, illustrating the vagaries of human contact in a very palpable way.</span></font></font><li class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt; tab-stops: list 36.0pt"><span lang="EN-CA"><font size="3"><font face="Times New Roman">In the mood for love/HK/Wong/2000: Languid exploration of an impossible love in the HK of the 60s. WKW reached his aesthetic pinnacle with this; looking at people smoking was never this exhilarating.</font></font></span><li class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt; tab-stops: list 36.0pt"><font size="3"><font face="Times New Roman"><span lang="EN-CA">Battle</span><span lang="EN-CA"> royale/Japan/Fukasaku/2000: B-movie social critique about a high school class send on an island to exterminate each other. I love the clash of high school dynamics and repeating machineguns. Fukasaku once again lets the ugly side of post-war Japanese society fester to the surface</span></font></font><li class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt; tab-stops: list 36.0pt"><span lang="EN-CA"><font size="3"><font face="Times New Roman">24 Hour Party People/UK/Winterbottom/2002: I never tire of watching this movie; it&rsquo;s so energetic and unabashedly cheerful, even when everything crashes around the main character. I don&rsquo;t have much to say about it though, contrary to pretty much every entry on the list I don&rsquo;t know much about the director&rsquo;s cannon (Winterbottom), I haven&rsquo;t noticed anything special about the direction as I&rsquo;m always so engrossed in the story I&rsquo;m affected by his technique instead of analyzing it. Oh and post-punk rocks!</font></font></span><li class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt; tab-stops: list 36.0pt"><span lang="EN-CA"><font size="3"><font face="Times New Roman">OldBoy/Korea/Park/2003: &ldquo;Laugh, and the world laughs with you; cry, and you cry alone.&rdquo; Korean cinema has been one of the most dynamic of the last few years, this is my favourite entry but there are plenty to explore and it goes in all directions (comedies, melodrama, genre movie, romance, historical epics, psychological drama, etc.). Since this list is finished maybe I&rsquo;ll recommend some Korean movies next.</font></font></span><li class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt; tab-stops: list 36.0pt"><span lang="EN-CA"><font size="3"><font face="Times New Roman">The beat that my heat skipped/De battre mon c&oelig;ur s&#39;est arr&ecirc;t&eacute;/France/Audiard/2005: This movie had such a strong, visceral impact the first time I watched it the stewardess had to remind me to turn off my ipod because the plane was landing. That it can pack such a punch on a small screen in this context says a lot about its emotional charge. What it&rsquo;s about: a young, restless man, torn between the sometimes harsh actions he thinks he must take to please various authority figures and find some kind of peace. Oh and since it&rsquo;s a fashion board maybe someone will know who made Romain Duris wardrobe, because the overall look is exactly what I like about the dressier side of clothing. </font></font></span>[/list]

Fuuma
10-11-2006, 12:23 PM
Glad there&#39;s a Miyazaki on your list. I think all of his films apart from Howl are among the best of the past 20 years. Even when you go back to his early TV shorts like Panda KoPanda, he has a beautiful vision. He really reminds me of Yohji&#39;s remark that fashion is about &quot;designing time&quot;. His imagination is populated by things as various as aeroplanes from the 1930s, European buildings from the 18th century, the Japanese countryside of his youth, the way that a certain girl of a certain age plays. These all take on a new meaning once they are recreated in a new space in time. And they will create a new kind of beauty again when the films are watched in 100 years.</p>

</p>

I also enjoy the recurring motives in his work very much, it creates a sense of unity without making you feel like you&#39;re watching rehashed stories. I think that, aside from his exploration of spatial movements, Miyazaki&#39;s thematic interest lies in the tension created by the transition from what was to what will be (from childhood to adulthood, from rural to urban, from ancient/mystical to present day/industrial, etc.)</p>

Fuuma
10-11-2006, 12:24 PM
Kitano and Kieslowski are also personal favourites, the Three Colors Trilogy is great but some of their early movieslike Blind Chance (which inspired movies likeTykwer&#39;s Run Lola Run) are worth seeing too.</p>

</p>

</p>

</p>

Did you see his most recent movie, what did you think of it? (I last saw him in Blood and bones but he was only starring in the film)</p>

Fuuma
10-11-2006, 12:27 PM
Glad to see Atom Egoyan in the list, movies like Exotica or Sweet Hereafter are among my favourites, he can portrait really quirky or disfuctional characters (more humanly and emotional) in a better way than any director of his genetation, way less hype than Jarmusch or Tarantino but more rewarding and provocative.</p>

</p>

Egoyan is an amazing director but comparing him to Tarantino or Jarmusch is unfair to everyone involved as his brand of filmaking is way different than the other two. He&#39;s more interested in seeing what lies beneath everyone&#39;s facade than anything else I&#39;d say.</p>

Fuuma
10-11-2006, 12:31 PM
suprised there is no tarkovsky... good call on the fruit chan picture.</p>

</p>

I&#39;ve never seen any Tarkovsky...don&#39;t know why actually as some of his movies come highly recommended. As for Fruit Chan I think he&#39;s really interesting and HK independant filmakers are a rarity. Have you seen more of his movies? I also like Durian Durian and Little Cheung.</p>

Jorge Hache
10-11-2006, 12:40 PM
Kitano and Kieslowski are also personal favourites, the Three Colors Trilogy is great but some of their early movieslike Blind Chance (which inspired movies likeTykwer&#39;s Run Lola Run) are worth seeing too.</p>

</p>

</p>

</p>

Did you see his most recent movie, what did you think of it? (I last saw him in Blood and bones but he was only starring in the film)</p>

</p>

</p>

No i didn&#39;t see it, the last Kitano movies i saw were Zatoichi and Dolls (both great movies, especially Dolls)</p>

I agree with your Egoyan comment, may be i didn&#39;t explain mysef very good, more than compare him with other (and hype directors like Jarmusch or Tarantino) in their cinematic skills, i try to say that what makes him more interesting (and appealing for my taste) is how he concentrate more in characters and the development of emotions, wich is no common ground on today cinema.</p>

Jorge Hache
10-11-2006, 12:46 PM
I like the inclusion of Haneke in your list, i think is a brave director with much to say (watch funny games or cache as an example)</p>

I hope to see some Von Trier movies or may be a Dogme one in your 2000 list, i agree with the movies you choose (well i didn&#39;t saw the Audiard one) - i have coincidentally all of them in my dvd collection (wich is not very big - less than 100 movies - but i&#39;m proud of it) - </p>

laika
10-11-2006, 01:07 PM
Oh wow Fuuma, what magnificent lists! I am frantically updating my netflix queue right now. Thanks so much for doing that.
</p>

Two movies for me in the past week:
</p>

Tony Takitani-- Jun Ichikawa</p>

Three Times--Hsiao-hsien Hou
</p>

</p>

dontbecruel
10-11-2006, 01:08 PM
Ah, what is three times like? I really meant to see it and missed it while it was on at the cinema here.

Faust
10-11-2006, 01:15 PM
I like the inclusion of Haneke in your list, i think is a brave director with much to say (watch funny games or cache as an example)</p>

I hope to see some Von Trier movies or may be a Dogme one in your 2000 list, i agree with the movies you choose (well i didn&#39;t saw the Audiard one) - i have coincidentally all of them in my dvd collection (wich is not very big - less than 100 movies - but i&#39;m proud of it) - </p>

</p>

Yeah, Dogville was the best film of 2000&#39;s for me, easily.</p>

Fuuma, thanks a lot - great list. I have a lot to watch (and learn).</p>

As far as Tarkovsky, I recommend The Stalker, and the original Solaris, of course.</p>

laika
10-11-2006, 01:32 PM
Ah, what is three times like? I really meant to see it and missed it while it was on at the cinema here.
</p>

</p>

I really liked it. Pacing-wise, it reminded me a bit of Tsai Ming-Liang, whose films i adore. The stories were a bit hard to follow--they almost felt like impressions of stories, rather than narratives. But the acting and filming was unbelievably precise--it was incredible just to watch to actors move, especially in first two stories. It was all very tender--I can&#39;t think of another word to describe it. I definitely recommend--let me know what you think, if you see it! ( the role of clothes in the movie is very interesting as well)
</p>

Fuuma
10-11-2006, 03:25 PM
I added Solaris and Stalker to my ziplist (samething as netflix). For some reason I kinda forgot about Tarkovsky and never checked him out, good call.</p>

As for the Taiwanese filmakers I found their films intriguing by never really &quot;got them&quot;. They make me feel like an outsider, watching something that all locals understand easily but that will always remain alien to me.</p>

</p>

</p>

Fuuma
10-11-2006, 03:27 PM
Oh wow Fuuma, what magnificent lists! I am frantically updating my netflix queue right now. Thanks so much for doing that.
</p>

Two movies for me in the past week:
</p>

Tony Takitani-- Jun Ichikawa</p>

Three Times--Hsiao-hsien Hou
</p>

</p>

</p>

Thanks, that&#39;s just what I like though so it&#39;s more expressive than prescriptive. BTW I&#39;m supposed to watch Tony Takitani in the next few days, have it at home right now, what did you think of it?</p>

Fuuma
10-11-2006, 04:22 PM
BTW I recently got a craving to watch some anime series, including oneI had seen the fan-subbed first episodes on a vhs tape a while ago (1999 to be exact, I&#39;ve been serious about various genre of this moviemaking thing for a while now...). Took me hours to find the name of the series in japanese, then find out there was an american release only to discover it was stopped after the first three volumes out of six because the company went under or didn&#39;t make a profit or something along those lines. I guess I&#39;ll settle for some avi subbed torrents. Anybody is knowledgeable where I could find plenty of free anime on the net? If that helps the name of the series was: Tenshi Ni Narumon/I&#39;m gonna be an angel. It&#39;s not recent and wasn&#39;t very well known at the time so just checking regular download sites might not help much. I think a dream kickstarted the whole thing, its kinda vague in my head why. Nevertheless I won&#39;t stop until I&#39;ve got all the episodes. OH and since I don&#39;t watch that much anime, anything interesting came out recently?

laika
10-11-2006, 05:36 PM
Oh no, I didn&#39;t see it as prescriptive--you just named a lot of movies i like, so I took the others up as suggestions.</p>

About Tony Takitani: I liked the film, but the story (which is Murakami&#39;s) disappointed me. The idea sounded so good, and I felt like it was a rather obvious way to carry it out. Then again, there is something to be said for the simplicity of being obvious, in this case. Definitely worth a watch--it&#39;s so short, just and hour and and a quarter. Let me know what you think of it.
</p>

mass
10-11-2006, 06:05 PM
suprised there is no tarkovsky... good call on the fruit chan picture.</p>

</p>

I&#39;ve never seen any Tarkovsky...don&#39;t know why actually as some of his movies come highly recommended. As for Fruit Chan I think he&#39;s really interesting and HK independant filmakers are a rarity. Have you seen more of his movies? I also like Durian Durian and Little Cheung.</p>

i've seen the 3 you've mentioned as well as 2 others... 'hollywood hong kong' and 'the longest summer'. i can recommend both... but the acting in the longest summer is especially poor (hk neorealism? in little cheung for example i think the amateur actors did a great job, this one... not so much).



for tarkovsky i would recommend all his films, but my favorites are (in order) andrei rublev, nostalghia and of course zerkalo/the mirror. they're all amazing. i actually favour nostalghia over andrei rublev for personal reasons, but whatever.

Colette
10-11-2006, 11:12 PM
I must see Cabinet of Dr. Caligari.</p>

</p>

i&#39;ve got that on DVD. one of my favorites... i think conrad veidt&#39;s character cesare has inspired the gothic set when it comes to fashion... ;)</p>

droogist
10-12-2006, 12:55 AM
Fuuma, that&#39;s a very solid lineup of directors. But no Kenji Mizoguchi or Carl Dreyer...?

</p>

Fuuma
10-12-2006, 10:34 AM
I must see Cabinet of Dr. Caligari.</p>

</p>

i&#39;ve got that on DVD. one of my favorites... i think conrad veidt&#39;s character cesare has inspired the gothic set when it comes to fashion... ;)</p>

</p>

I do agree that those german expressionism films must have been a major inspiration for 80s gothic rockers.</p>

Fuuma
10-12-2006, 10:35 AM
Fuuma, that&#39;s a very solid lineup of directors. But no Kenji Mizoguchi or Carl Dreyer...?

</p>

</p>

Lists are all about sins of omission aren&#39;t they?</p>

Fuuma
10-12-2006, 10:40 AM
suprised there is no tarkovsky... good call on the fruit chan picture.</p>

</p>

I&#39;ve never seen any Tarkovsky...don&#39;t know why actually as some of his movies come highly recommended. As for Fruit Chan I think he&#39;s really interesting and HK independant filmakers are a rarity. Have you seen more of his movies? I also like Durian Durian and Little Cheung.</p>

i&#39;ve seen the 3 you&#39;ve mentioned as well as 2 others... &#39;hollywood hong kong&#39; and &#39;the longest summer&#39;. i can recommend both... but the acting in the longest summer is especially poor (hk neorealism? in little cheung for example i think the amateur actors did a great job, this one... not so much).

for tarkovsky i would recommend all his films, but my favorites are (in order) andrei rublev, nostalghia and of course zerkalo/the mirror. they&#39;re all amazing. i actually favour nostalghia over andrei rublev for personal reasons, but whatever.</p>

Longest summer is the one with the soldiers?</p>

BTW I recently watched the adjuster, I know there&#39;s a few Egoyan fans here so anybody seen it? What did the bow and arrow thing mean to you, aside from being totaly unexpected and later somewhat explained by the house location? It feels very primal when the character does it, which could make it thedestructive pendant of the enormous and somewhat twistedempathy he displays for his &quot;clients&quot;.</p>

Fuuma
10-16-2006, 12:33 PM
Some of my recent viewings:</p>

Ranma 1/2 OAV: the one to carry on part 1/2</p>

Ranma 1/2 OAV: re-awakening memories part 1/2</p>

Election\HK\To\2005</p>

Tenshi Ni Narumon TV series 1-8\Japan\Hiroki\1999 (found it, though those are ripped from vhs so the quality is not very high, even for avis)</p>

Murder my sweet\USA\Dmytryk\1944</p>

The adjuster\Can\Egoyan\1991</p>

The man who shot liberty Valance\USA\Ford\1962</p>

The Asphalt jungle\USA\Huston\1950</p>

Future viewings:</p>

Tony Takitani</p>

Tenshi Ni Narumon 9-26</p>

Bloody ties (hard-boiled Korean movie released in 2006)</p>

The big heat</p>

Ranma 1/2OAV DVD 1</p>

</p>

Faust
10-16-2006, 04:27 PM
To mix up the high brow tone here that might scare some people off - I watched The Station Agent the other day [:D]. It was a pretty good movie. It was no piece of art, but I liked its humility and compassion. I like Bobby Cannavale. I&#39;ve seen him in theater, he could play better than most of those hollywood bozos. Too bad he&#39;s been mostly on TV, as IMDB told me.

Fuuma
10-16-2006, 04:48 PM
I remember the station agent being well received by critics. I was involved with movie boards at the time and posters were pretty divided on the film but I never ended up checking it out...

Micht
10-23-2006, 04:44 PM
I must see Cabinet of Dr. Caligari.</p>

</p>


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Zty1bgsivxA

Faust
10-23-2006, 08:32 PM
I must see Cabinet of Dr. Caligari.</p>

</p>




http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Zty1bgsivxA
</p>

Holy shit, the whole film? Nice, thank you, and welcome!
</p>

Jorge Hache
10-24-2006, 11:59 AM
Yesterday i saw Tsai Ming-liang&#39;s The Wayward Cloud (Tian bian yi duo yun) , still trying to figure out if i like it or i hate it (interesting enough to leave me thinking)

designersheep
10-26-2006, 03:15 AM
Hi everyone.

I&#39;m new here, so here is a short intro of myself (do we have a thread for it?)

My name is Jun and I&#39;m from New Zealand.

I am a filmmaker wannabe. I am yet to film anything properly, but I am soooo very much in love with cinema, and I will do something, one day. I would watch crazy amount of films (about one film per day on average) for 5~6 years, up until earlier this year, when the streak had to end due to having nothing more to watch :)

My other interests are painting, photography, literature, lit./art criticism, philosophy, and language. But how odd that I work in an IT job.

I&#39;ve only recently got interested in fashion, and my wardrobe definitely pales in comparison with the regulars here. I hope to learn more from here!


Now, to stay on the topic:

I highly regard most of the films mentioned by Fuuma :) I am amazed you haven&#39;t yet watched a Tarkovsky.

To anyone who is new to Tarkovsky, I would definitely recommend watching his films in chronological order, because his films became more difficult as his career progressed. Perhaps difficult may not be the best word, but his narrative techniques increasingly became more abstract and elusive, and his pacing became slower.

Now here is a short intro and recommendation of my favorite filmmaker.

Robert Bresson (France)
- Au hasard Balthazar
- Diary of a country priest

Robert Bresson is a very peculiar film director. He saw that cinema was flooded with entertainment and what he called filmed theatres&#39;. What he really wanted was to establish cinema as an art form unqiue in its own, and something that is not a mixture of other forms of art. Therefore he came up with a very unique way of making films, and that is by using non-professional actors and actresses, rehearsing them over 20 times in order to drain every attempt to &#39;act&#39; so that their acting becomes emotionless and dry, and then filming them with the utmost neutrality. Then in the editing processes he juxtaposes these neutral scenes to create drama and emotion that was not there in the first place. That is what Robert Bresson calls pure cinema, or a miracle.

His particular style of filmmaking is truly unique, and although his films may seem uninteresting to some, his technique of trying to capture the neutrality and what he calls the truth, successfully removes all pretense and allows the viewers to freely engage and put in their own interpretations, meanings, and emotions. Simply by not forcing and remaining mysterious, we are enormously drawn in. Well... at least that is how I feel :)

Here are three more recommendations of my other favorite directors:

Abbas Kiarostami (Iran)
- Taste of cherry
- Close-up
- Kohker trilogy (Where is the friend&#39;s house, And life goes on, Through the olive trees)

Ozu Yasujiro (Japan)
- Ukigusa (Floating weeds)
- Tokyo monogatari (Tokyo story)
- and everything else

Andrei Tarkovsky (Russia)
- Andrei Rublev
- Offret (The sacrifice)
- Nostalghia
- Zerkalo (Mirror)

And then there&#39;s Godard, Bergman, Erice, Bunuel, Rohmer, Antonioni, Fellini, Greenaway, Teshigahara, Naruse, Tarr, Dreyer, Makhmalbaf, and so on....

Here are some of the film sites I frequent:

http://www.mastersofcinema.com
http://www.dvdbeaver.com
http://www.criterionco.com

mass
10-26-2006, 04:19 AM
i really love bresson... i love mouchette, although to be honest it took me a few tries before i could get through all of diary of a country priest in one sitting...


i watched the departed last week... kind of dissapointed because i thought it started off extremely well. nobody agrees with me that harvey keitel would've played the part better than jack nicholson, either. looking forward to borat soon...

Faust
10-26-2006, 09:45 AM
Welcome, designersheep. Thanks for the input on the cinema. As far as wardrobe, I hear it recently got a major boost.</p>

Hmm, we don&#39;t have an introduction thread, I never felt a need for it, we find out about each other little by little, and some people on here know each other already. Should we have such a thread?
</p>

Fuuma
10-27-2006, 07:43 PM
Hi Jun, welcome!. Great to have yet another film lover onboard!</p>

I second the suggestion of Kiarostami, Ozu, Bresson and pretty much everyone else you mentionned. However, in a sense, those are pretty safe choices among the film loving set. They&#39;re great as recommendations and because these directors are genuinely good and involving(you might have noted that the majority of directors you mentionned are also on the list I made even though I only named 100 films) but I believe you understand a lot about a cinephile by hearing about the lesser-known/generally disliked or at least not highly considered movies they love. Or even about the masters/classics they dislike (I should post about why, while I rank most of Bresson&#39;s movies I&#39;ve seen from good to incredible, I&#39;m nottoo found of Au hazard Balthazar and it&#39;s christ-like donkey). You might have seen, for exemple, that I genuinely enjoyed the Belmondo vehicule &quot;Le magnifique&quot; (and countless others Belmondo moviesfor that matter) or British crime movie &quot;Get carter&quot;. Those are personal choices that I&#39;m not sure many cinephile share or recognize as favorites. So I&#39;m wondering what are your own cinematic &quot;quirks&quot;.</p>

xcoldricex
10-28-2006, 10:59 AM
Yesterday i saw Tsai Ming-liang&#39;s The Wayward Cloud (Tian bian yi duo yun) , still trying to figure out if i like it or i hate it (interesting enough to leave me thinking)</p>


ah tsai ming-liang... you need a whole lot of patience to watch his movies. I don&#39;t recall if I&#39;ve seen that particular one...
</p>

Fuuma
10-28-2006, 03:21 PM
i really love bresson... i love mouchette, although to be honest it took me a few tries before i could get through all of diary of a country priest in one sitting... i watched the departed last week... kind of dissapointed because i thought it started off extremely well. nobody agrees with me that harvey keitel would&#39;ve played the part better than jack nicholson, either. looking forward to borat soon...</p>

<span style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Arial">I think the two adaptation of Bernanos novels I saw (diary of a country priest-Bresson and Under the sun ofSatan-Pialat)were pretty amazing in the depth with which they explored the meaning of faith, especially how their Christ-like characters were unsuited (too pure?)to daily life as members of small, rural communities. It&#39;s interesting to note that Pialat was definitely a non-believer, contrary to Bresson, which didn&#39;t stop him from making a deeply mystical film. He, of course, mixed it with his usual brand of conflicted characters all fragility and defiance clashing against each others in extreme contexts (death, love, suicide, etc.) but stayed away from his typical naturalism for amore literary style that made me think, in a way, of Bresson&#39;s direction (with emotion addedin the mix...).</span></p>

<span style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Arial">I saw the Departed and actually enjoyed the movie. The story is pretty much the same as Infernal Affairs but the treatment is what makes it different, IA is a sleek, modern, tightly editedthriller all steely blues and greys set in the &quot;high rise jungle&quot; not a well made cop/gangster drama with interesting characterizations, a 70s editing style (no MTV for you!!) and a good depiction of Boston slums and urban decay. DiCaprio is certainly not a great actor and almost unbelievable as any form of tough guy but I guess Scorsese&#39;s talent made me forget that a little. As for Damon he can only play a clean-cut, up and coming preppy young man and thankfully that&#39;s what the role entailed, which means his small range didn&rsquo;t work against the movie. The supporting roles were all good example of traditional Hollywood character acting and I thoroughly enjoyed that. FinallyI&#39;m sure lots of viewers kept seeing Keitel or DeNiro in the Nicholson role but he was doing an appropriate job, mixing some low key acting with his typical over the top fare.</span></p>

</p>

Servo2000
10-29-2006, 02:50 PM
Hi Jun, welcome!. Great to have yet another film lover onboard!</p>

You might have seen, for exemple, that I genuinely enjoyed the Belmondo vehicule &quot;Le magnifique&quot; (and countless others Belmondo moviesfor that matter) or British crime movie &quot;Get carter&quot;. Those are personal choices that I&#39;m not sure many cinephile share or recognize as favorites. So I&#39;m wondering what are your own cinematic &quot;quirks&quot;.
</p>

To take another break from the high brow, if you&#39;re referring to the Michael Caine version of Get Carter, then I&#39;m with you.</p>

On a side note, I really enjoyed this documentary on the Hikikomori phenomon by Francesco Jodice. I think it&#39;s about 20 minutes long, you can view it at his website: http://www.francescojodice.com/VHikEn.htm. Some of our japanese posters might know about it as well, it&#39;ll be interesting to hear what you cinema fanatics think of it, you film otakus.</p>

casem
10-29-2006, 11:20 PM
Wow, I I&#39;m not as much of a film buff as many of you, though I recognize some of what was posted from when I took French Film is college (Ent&#39;racte, Un Chien Andalou). The last thing I saw was Gondry&#39;s Science of Sleep. I really loved it, all the effects are so homeade but the whole film really left an impression on me. It&#39;s just such unrestrained creativity and association, I really got caught up in it even though it lacks much of a plot. My all time favorites are:<div>- Party Monster</div><div>- A Home at the End of the World</div><div>- Dancer in the Dark</div><div>- The Gleaner&#39;s and I</div><div>- The Dreamers</div><div>- Mysterious Skin</div>

Fuuma
10-30-2006, 11:00 AM
Hi Jun, welcome!. Great to have yet another film lover onboard!</p>

You might have seen, for exemple, that I genuinely enjoyed the Belmondo vehicule &quot;Le magnifique&quot; (and countless others Belmondo moviesfor that matter) or British crime movie &quot;Get carter&quot;. Those are personal choices that I&#39;m not sure many cinephile share or recognize as favorites. So I&#39;m wondering what are your own cinematic &quot;quirks&quot;. </p>

To take another break from the high brow, if you&#39;re referring to the Michael Caine version of Get Carter, then I&#39;m with you.</p>

On a side note, I really enjoyed this documentary on the Hikikomori phenomon by Francesco Jodice. I think it&#39;s about 20 minutes long, you can view it at his website: http://www.francescojodice.com/VHikEn.htm. Some of our japanese posters might know about it as well, it&#39;ll be interesting to hear what you cinema fanatics think of it, you film otakus.</p>

</p>

</p>

Yeah, the one where Michael Caine plays Carter not the Stalone remake (where Caine also stars but in a different role). Hikikomori are those tota recluses that spend their whole lives in their rooms right, I&#39;ll check the doc out as such refusal of social interaction really is a fascinating/grotesque reaction to the pressures of rigid social normative constructs. This isn&#39;t new though, I&#39;d say i,ve heard the term about 8yrs ago or something like that (end of 90s, maybe early 2000s at most).</p>

Fuuma
10-30-2006, 11:00 AM
Wow, I I&#39;m not as much of a film buff as many of you, though I recognize some of what was posted from when I took French Film is college (Ent&#39;racte, Un Chien Andalou). The last thing I saw was Gondry&#39;s Science of Sleep. I really loved it, all the effects are so homeade but the whole film really left an impression on me. It&#39;s just such unrestrained creativity and association, I really got caught up in it even though it lacks much of a plot. My all time favorites are: <div>- Party Monster</div><div>- A Home at the End of the World</div><div>- Dancer in the Dark</div><div>- The Gleaner&#39;s and I</div><div>- The Dreamers</div><div>- Mysterious Skin</div>

</p>

</p>

That remind me I need to check out the dreamers, and maybe science of sleep.</p>

mass
10-30-2006, 01:28 PM
i haven't seen under the sun of satan, is it something you would recommend? diary of a country priest if i remember correctly is also tarkovsky's all time favorite film



a friend of mine tells me they filmed (not sure how much) the departed in nyc, which doesn't make sense to me. anyways it started off really really promising (in gritty scorsese style. fyi i was really dissapointed in his last 2 films, and i think bringing out the dead is grossly underrated, etc) but it just got weird for me. i don't think i ever saw deniro in the role, maybe it was too obvious or maybe i had just watched from dusk til dawn a few days earlier; i think nicholson did an ok job but he just reminded me of the joker (my friend says it's because he hasn't done a role like that since joker, which makes sense, but in a way it also reminded me of him in that adam sandler film. i guess i'm just not a huge fan of eccentric-nicholson. one flew over the cuckoo's nest is the obvious exception). i just don't think he 'fits' the role, esp when compared with his character from IA. alsooo SPOILERS AHEAD>>>>>>>>>> i didn't understand the inclusion of the goofy black guy (from romeo must die, etc. sorry, i'd google his name but i'm in the middle of a conf call. believe me when i say my friends and i still refer to jason statham as 'turkish')... maybe just to throw off everyone who had seen IA? i loved wahlberg's character though! and baldwin to an extent. i also really liked matt damon in this... and i haven't liked him in anything other than rounders and good will hunting (somebody once wrote, and this won't be funny at all since i'm paraphrasing, "if goodwill hunting came out today would you ever believe a movie starring matt damon, robin williams and ben affleck could be good?"). also, listening to those chinese dealers/gangsters/etc. speak cantonese was painful. it would've been cool if he could've gotten someone from IA to make a cameo.






i really love bresson... i love mouchette, although to be honest it took me a few tries before i could get through all of diary of a country priest in one sitting... i watched the departed last week... kind of dissapointed because i thought it started off extremely well. nobody agrees with me that harvey keitel would&#39;ve played the part better than jack nicholson, either. looking forward to borat soon...</p>

<span style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Arial">I think the two adaptation of Bernanos novels I saw (diary of a country priest-Bresson and Under the sun ofSatan-Pialat)were pretty amazing in the depth with which they explored the meaning of faith, especially how their Christ-like characters were unsuited (too pure?)to daily life as members of small, rural communities. It&#39;s interesting to note that Pialat was definitely a non-believer, contrary to Bresson, which didn&#39;t stop him from making a deeply mystical film. He, of course, mixed it with his usual brand of conflicted characters all fragility and defiance clashing against each others in extreme contexts (death, love, suicide, etc.) but stayed away from his typical naturalism for amore literary style that made me think, in a way, of Bresson&#39;s direction (with emotion addedin the mix...).</span></p>

<span style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Arial">I saw the Departed and actually enjoyed the movie. The story is pretty much the same as Infernal Affairs but the treatment is what makes it different, IA is a sleek, modern, tightly editedthriller all steely blues and greys set in the &quot;high rise jungle&quot; not a well made cop/gangster drama with interesting characterizations, a 70s editing style (no MTV for you!!) and a good depiction of Boston slums and urban decay. DiCaprio is certainly not a great actor and almost unbelievable as any form of tough guy but I guess Scorsese&#39;s talent made me forget that a little. As for Damon he can only play a clean-cut, up and coming preppy young man and thankfully that&#39;s what the role entailed, which means his small range didn&rsquo;t work against the movie. The supporting roles were all good example of traditional Hollywood character acting and I thoroughly enjoyed that. FinallyI&#39;m sure lots of viewers kept seeing Keitel or DeNiro in the Nicholson role but he was doing an appropriate job, mixing some low key acting with his typical over the top fare.</span></p>

</p>

casem
10-30-2006, 03:12 PM
Has anyone seen Drawing Restraint 9? I&#39;m a huge Bjork fan, I&#39;ve got the soundtrack she did for it and it is possibly the strangest thing she has done. I wonder if it&#39;s worth seeing or if it is too out there to be enjoyable.

Fuuma
11-06-2006, 01:26 PM
<p class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt"><span lang="EN-CA" style="font-size: 10pt"><font face="Times New Roman">I would definitely recommend Under the sun of Satan, but not as your first Pialat as it&rsquo;s a departure from his usual style. &Agrave; nos amours is incredibly good and now available on criterion so you should have no problems finding it, I&rsquo;d say it would be a good idea to go with that.</font></span></p><p class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt"><span lang="EN-CA" style="font-size: 10pt"><font face="Times New Roman"></font></span></p><p class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt"><span lang="EN-CA" style="font-size: 10pt"><font face="Times New Roman">As for The Departed well the Nicholson character is definitely a DeNiro role but the man has really let us down in his last performance, which is a shame when you consider his talent. I guess he wasn&rsquo;t bad in The Score (2001) and Ronin (1998) but that was a while ago..</font></span></p><p class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt"><span lang="EN-CA" style="font-size: 10pt"><font face="Times New Roman"></font></span></p><p class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt"><span lang="EN-CA" style="font-size: 10pt"><font face="Times New Roman">Concerning IA: well I think Eric Tsang&rsquo;s performance was pretty exceptional, but he&rsquo;s one of a handful of HK character actors who I quite enjoy seeing in this kind of role. </font></span></p><p class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt"><span lang="EN-CA" style="font-size: 10pt"><font face="Times New Roman"></font></span></p><p class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt"><span lang="EN-CA" style="font-size: 10pt"><font face="Times New Roman">On another note when I heard the Chinese gangsters in The Departed speak Cantonese I just assumed Chinese government agents went with one of the powerful HK triad to handle the deal, it didn&rsquo;t seem that off to me but maybe you&rsquo;re right and it&rsquo;s just a glaring mistake.</font></span></p>

Faust
11-13-2006, 11:53 AM
Bored: posting my Netflix Que.</p><table border="0" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" class="qtbl"><tbody><tr><td class="st"></td><td class="sr"></td><td class="sm"></td><td class="sc"></td><td class="sa"></td><td class="srm"></td></tr>
<tr bgcolor="#ffffff" valign="bottom">
<td class="h" style="padding-left: 2px">Priority</td>
<td class="h">Movie Title</td>

<td class="h">Star Rating</td>

<td align="center" class="h">MPAA</td>
<td class="h">Genre</td>
<td class="h">Availability</td>

<td align="center" class="h"><table cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0"><tbody><tr valign="bottom"><td class="h">Remove</td><td align="center" class="h" style="padding-left: 7px">Move to Top</td></tr></tbody></table></td>
</tr>
</tbody></table>


<table border="0" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" class="qtbl">
<tbody><tr><td class="sp"></td><td class="st"></td><td class="sr"></td><td class="sm"></td><td class="sc"></td><td class="sa"></td><td class="srm"></td></tr>
<tr class="bd"><td class="qn"><input class="o" maxlength="3" name="OR60026141" onblur="TB(this)" onfocus="TF(this)" value="1" /><input name="OP60026141" type="hidden" value="1" /></td><td class="et"><div class="stc">Irreversible (http://www.netflix.com/MovieDisplay?movieid=60026141&amp;trkid=90529)</div></td><td align="center"><div class="fwdgt" id="wM60026141_90529_1_1" onmouseover="wR(&#39;M60026141_90529_1_1&#39;, 1, 28,event)">
http://cdn.nflximg.com/us/pages/widget/stars_1_28.gif

</div>
</td><td class="ec">UR</td><td class="e">Foreign</td><td class="e"><div class="sac">Now</div></td><td class="c"><input name="R60026141" onclick="T(this);" type="checkbox" />http://cdn.nflximg.com/us/pages/queue/movetop.gif</td></tr><tr class="s"><td colspan="7"></td></tr><tr class="bd"><td class="qn"><input class="o" maxlength="3" name="OR60011325" onblur="TB(this)" onfocus="TF(this)" value="2" /><input name="OP60011325" type="hidden" value="2" /></td><td class="et"><div class="stc">The Remains of the Day (http://www.netflix.com/MovieDisplay?movieid=60011325&amp;trkid=90529)</div></td><td align="center"><div class="fwdgt" id="wM60011325_90529_1_2" onmouseover="wR(&#39;M60011325_90529_1_2&#39;, 1, 37,event)">
http://cdn.nflximg.com/us/pages/widget/stars_1_37.gif

</div>
</td><td class="ec">PG-13</td><td class="e">Drama</td><td class="e"><div class="sac">Now</div></td><td class="c"><input name="R60011325" onclick="T(this);" type="checkbox" />http://cdn.nflximg.com/us/pages/queue/movetop.gif</td></tr><tr class="s"><td colspan="7"></td></tr><tr class="bd"><td class="qn"><input class="o" maxlength="3" name="OR70043621" onblur="TB(this)" onfocus="TF(this)" value="3" /><input name="OP70043621" type="hidden" value="3" /></td><td class="et"><div class="stc">Seamless (http://www.netflix.com/MovieDisplay?movieid=70043621&amp;trkid=90529)</div></td><td align="center"><div class="fwdgt" id="wM70043621_90529_1_3" onmouseover="wR(&#39;M70043621_90529_1_3&#39;, 1, 29,event)">
http://cdn.nflximg.com/us/pages/widget/stars_1_29.gif

</div>
</td><td class="ec">NR</td><td class="e">Documentary</td><td class="e"><div class="sac">Now</div></td><td class="c"><input name="R70043621" onclick="T(this);" type="checkbox" />http://cdn.nflximg.com/us/pages/queue/movetop.gif</td></tr><tr class="s"><td colspan="7"></td></tr><tr class="bd"><td class="qn"><input class="o" maxlength="3" name="OR60011023" onblur="TB(this)" onfocus="TF(this)" value="4" /><input name="OP60011023" type="hidden" value="4" /></td><td class="et"><div class="stc">The Battle of Algiers (http://www.netflix.com/MovieDisplay?movieid=60011023&amp;trkid=90529)</div></td><td align="center"><div class="fwdgt" id="wM60011023_90529_1_4" onmouseover="wR(&#39;M60011023_90529_1_4&#39;, 1, 40,event)">
http://cdn.nflximg.com/us/pages/widget/stars_1_40.gif

</div>
</td><td class="ec">UR</td><td class="e">Foreign</td><td class="e"><div class="sac">Now</div></td><td class="c"><input name="R60011023" onclick="T(this);" type="checkbox" />http://cdn.nflximg.com/us/pages/queue/movetop.gif</td></tr><tr class="s"><td colspan="7"></td></tr><tr class="bd"><td class="qn"><input class="o" maxlength="3" name="OR60032450" onblur="TB(this)" onfocus="TF(this)" value="5" /><input name="OP60032450" type="hidden" value="5" /></td><td class="et"><div class="stc">Naked Lunch (http://www.netflix.com/MovieDisplay?movieid=60032450&amp;trkid=90529)</div></td><td align="center"><div class="fwdgt" id="wM60032450_90529_1_5" onmouseover="wR(&#39;M60032450_90529_1_5&#39;, 1, 33,event)">
http://cdn.nflximg.com/us/pages/widget/stars_1_33.gif

</div>
</td><td class="ec">R</td><td class="e">Drama</td><td class="e"><div class="sac">Now</div></td><td class="c"><input name="R60032450" onclick="T(this);" type="checkbox" />http://cdn.nflximg.com/us/pages/queue/movetop.gif</td></tr><tr class="s"><td colspan="7"></td></tr><tr class="bd"><td class="qn"><input class="o" maxlength="3" name="OR1093793" onblur="TB(this)" onfocus="TF(this)" value="6" /><input name="OP1093793" type="hidden" value="6" /></td><td class="et"><div class="stc">Videodrome (http://www.netflix.com/MovieDisplay?movieid=1093793&amp;trkid=90529)</div></td><td align="center"><div class="fwdgt" id="wM1093793_90529_1_6" onmouseover="wR(&#39;M1093793_90529_1_6&#39;, 1, 33,event)">
http://cdn.nflximg.com/us/pages/widget/stars_1_33.gif

</div>
</td><td class="ec">R</td><td class="e">Horror</td><td class="e"><div class="sac">Now</div></td><td class="c"><input name="R1093793" onclick="T(this);" type="checkbox" />http://cdn.nflximg.com/us/pages/queue/movetop.gif</td></tr><tr class="s"><td colspan="7"></td></tr><tr class="bd"><td class="qn"><input class="o" maxlength="3" name="OR60027106" onblur="TB(this)" onfocus="TF(this)" value="7" /><input name="OP60027106" type="hidden" value="7" /></td><td class="et"><div class="stc">Kiki&#39;s Delivery Service (http://www.netflix.com/MovieDisplay?movieid=60027106&amp;trkid=90529)http://cdn.nflximg.com/us/layout/recs/icon_rec.gif (http://www.netflix.com/MovieDisplay?trkid=&amp;movieid=60027106&amp;lnkctr=RecLis tStar)</div></td><td align="center"><div class="fwdgt" id="wM60027106_90529_1_7" onmouseover="wR(&#39;M60027106_90529_1_7&#39;, 1, 42,event)">
http://cdn.nflximg.com/us/pages/widget/stars_1_42.gif

</div>
</td><td class="ec">G</td><td class="e">Children &amp; Family</td><td class="e"><div class="sac">Now</div></td><td class="c"><input name="R60027106" onclick="T(this);" type="checkbox" />http://cdn.nflximg.com/us/pages/queue/movetop.gif</td></tr><tr class="s"><td colspan="7"></td></tr><tr class="bd"><td class="qn"><input class="o" maxlength="3" name="OR60003330" onblur="TB(this)" onfocus="TF(this)" value="8" /><input name="OP60003330" type="hidden" value="8" /></td><td class="et"><div class="stc">Wall Street (http://www.netflix.com/MovieDisplay?movieid=60003330&amp;trkid=90529)</div></td><td align="center"><div class="fwdgt" id="wM60003330_90529_1_8" onmouseover="wR(&#39;M60003330_90529_1_8&#39;, 1, 33,event)">
http://cdn.nflximg.com/us/pages/widget/stars_1_33.gif

</div>
</td><td class="ec">R</td><td class="e">Drama</td><td class="e"><div class="sac">Now</div></td><td class="c"><input name="R60003330" onclick="T(this);" type="checkbox" />http://cdn.nflximg.com/us/pages/queue/movetop.gif</td></tr><tr class="s"><td colspan="7"></td></tr><tr class="bd"><td class="qn"><input class="o" maxlength="3" name="OR247351" onblur="TB(this)" onfocus="TF(this)" value="9" /><input name="OP247351" type="hidden" value="9" /></td><td class="et"><div class="stc">Amadeus (http://www.netflix.com/MovieDisplay?movieid=247351&amp;trkid=90529)</div></td><td align="center"><div class="fwdgt" id="wM247351_90529_1_9" onmouseover="wR(&#39;M247351_90529_1_9&#39;, 1, 37,event)">
http://cdn.nflximg.com/us/pages/widget/stars_1_37.gif

</div>
</td><td class="ec">PG</td><td class="e">Drama</td><td class="e"><div class="sac">Now</div></td><td class="c"><input name="R247351" onclick="T(this);" type="checkbox" />http://cdn.nflximg.com/us/pages/queue/movetop.gif</td></tr><tr class="s"><td colspan="7"></td></tr></tbody></table>
<table border="0" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" class="qtbl"><tbody><tr><td class="sp"></td><td class="st"></td><td class="sr"></td><td class="sm"></td><td class="sc"></td><td class="sa"></td><td class="srm"></td></tr>
<tr class="bd"><td class="qn"><input class="o" maxlength="3" name="OR70043440" onblur="TB(this)" onfocus="TF(this)" value="10" /><input name="OP70043440" type="hidden" value="10" /></td><td class="et"><div class="stc">Zizek! (http://www.netflix.com/MovieDisplay?movieid=70043440&amp;trkid=90529)</div></td><td align="center"><div class="fwdgt" id="wM70043440_90529_1_10" onmouseover="wR(&#39;M70043440_90529_1_10&#39;, 1, 23,event)">
http://cdn.nflximg.com/us/pages/widget/stars_1_23.gif

</div>
</td><td class="ec">NR</td><td class="e">Documentary</td><td class="e"><div class="sac">Now</div></td><td class="c"><input name="R70043440" onclick="T(this);" type="checkbox" />http://cdn.nflximg.com/us/pages/queue/movetop.gif</td></tr><tr class="s"><td colspan="7"></td></tr><tr class="bd"><td class="qn"><input class="o" maxlength="3" name="OR21477356" onblur="TB(this)" onfocus="TF(this)" value="11" /><input name="OP21477356" type="hidden" value="11" /></td><td class="et"><div class="stc">Ladies and Gentlemen, Mr. Leonard Cohen (http://www.netflix.com/MovieDisplay?movieid=21477356&amp;trkid=90529)</div></td><td align="center"><div class="fwdgt" id="wM21477356_90529_1_11" onmouseover="wR(&#39;M21477356_90529_1_11&#39;, 1, 27,event)">
http://cdn.nflximg.com/us/pages/widget/stars_1_27.gif

</div>
</td><td class="ec">UR</td><td class="e">Music &amp; Musicals </td><td class="e"><div class="sac">Now</div></td><td class="c"><input name="R21477356" onclick="T(this);" type="checkbox" />http://cdn.nflximg.com/us/pages/queue/movetop.gif</td></tr></tbody></table>

</p>

xcoldricex
11-13-2006, 10:06 PM
a friend of mine tells me they filmed (not sure how much) the departed in nyc, which doesn&#39;t make sense to me. anyways it started off really really promising (in gritty scorsese style. fyi i was really dissapointed in his last 2 films, and i think bringing out the dead is grossly underrated, etc) but it just got weird for me. i don&#39;t think i ever saw deniro in the role, maybe it was too obvious or maybe i had just watched from dusk til dawn a few days earlier; i think nicholson did an ok job but he just reminded me of the joker (my friend says it&#39;s because he hasn&#39;t done a role like that since joker, which makes sense, but in a way it also reminded me of him in that adam sandler film. i guess i&#39;m just not a huge fan of eccentric-nicholson. one flew over the cuckoo&#39;s nest is the obvious exception). i just don&#39;t think he &#39;fits&#39; the role, esp when compared with his character from IA. alsooo SPOILERS AHEAD&gt;&gt;&gt;&gt;&gt;&gt;&gt;&gt;&gt;&gt; i didn&#39;t understand the inclusion of the goofy black guy (from romeo must die, etc. sorry, i&#39;d google his name but i&#39;m in the middle of a conf call. believe me when i say my friends and i still refer to jason statham as &#39;turkish&#39;)... maybe just to throw off everyone who had seen IA? i loved wahlberg&#39;s character though! and baldwin to an extent. i also really liked matt damon in this... and i haven&#39;t liked him in anything other than rounders and good will hunting (somebody once wrote, and this won&#39;t be funny at all since i&#39;m paraphrasing, &quot;if goodwill hunting came out today would you ever believe a movie starring matt damon, robin williams and ben affleck could be good?&quot;). also, listening to those chinese dealers/gangsters/etc. speak cantonese was painful. it would&#39;ve been cool if he could&#39;ve gotten someone from IA to make a cameo.</p>


haha i totally agree. that guy made me think of harold and kumar (where he played a burger drive-thru guy..</p>



also, listening to those chinese dealers/gangsters/etc. speak cantonese
was painful. it would&#39;ve been cool if he could&#39;ve gotten someone from
IA to make a cameo. </p>

haha i think i said this exact same thing over at SF. anyway i liked IA a lot more.
</p>

mass
11-15-2006, 07:04 AM
yeah... i dunno. actually i just read the other day that de niro was signed on to be in it, but i don't know for what part. i'm thinking martin sheen's role? anyway i am looking forward to the good shepard...




so the past week...


watched borat, enjoyed it very much.



watched exiled, i enjoyed this immensley as well. lots of powdered blood (the best kind). pacing was kind of iffy though.



watched my unsubbed copy le deuxieme souffle. i have a subtitled vhs copy somewhere but i don't think my vcr likes it. i was in montreal last week and i'm preetttyyyy sure i saw a poster for this, but i was half awake so i could've dreamt it. anyways it turns out they are remaking this with daniel auteuil as gu. i don't like the sound of that. monica bellucci is in it also. ALSO, eric cantona is in it, for the football fans. hate man utd. but cantona may be my favorite football player ever.




watched bring me the head of alfredo garcia, which i have always really really loved.



watched you, me and dupree. it was on tv



caught the first 5 minutes of the devil wears prada. heh.

Faust
11-16-2006, 02:27 PM
I watched Irreversible yesterday. What a gruesome film. I have to say, sometimes I wonder about whether films like these should exist (same goes for something like Requiem for a Dream). The balance of sheer portrayal of violence by far outweighed the social and psychological points the film addressed (revenge, fate, etc.). The camera work was pretty amazing though - a bit too much at times, but mostly well done and innovative.

Servo2000
11-17-2006, 12:45 AM
I noticed that on your list of films and was tempted to say just that, but frankly, it seems like a lot of people had just the opposite opinion, so I left you to it.

Faust
11-17-2006, 09:29 AM
I noticed that on your list of films and was tempted to say just that, but frankly, it seems like a lot of people had just the opposite opinion, so I left you to it.</p>

I would love to hear what their opinion is in detail.</p>

xcoldricex
11-17-2006, 11:54 AM
anyone a fan of shunji iwai?</p>

Fuuma
11-17-2006, 02:58 PM
anyone a fan of shunji iwai?</p>

</p>

I kinda like him and his over the top emotionality. I&#39;ve seen:</p>

Love letter</p>

Swallow tail &amp; butterfly</p>

April story</p>

All about Lily Chou-Chou</p>

Hana and Alice</p>

Oh and I&#39;ll post some comments on Irreversible and an update on some recent films i&#39;ve watched soon.</p>

Servo2000
11-19-2006, 01:51 PM
I noticed that on your list of films and was tempted to say just that, but frankly, it seems like a lot of people had just the opposite opinion, so I left you to it.</p>

I would love to hear what their opinion is in detail.</p><div><br class="khtml-block-placeholder" /></div><div>As would I, Faust, as would I.</div>

Fuuma
11-20-2006, 12:05 PM
<p class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt"><span lang="EN-CA"><font size="3"><font face="Times New Roman">My recent viewings (+-50 films in October-November) can, for the most part, be grouped in two rough categories: </font></font></span></p><ul style="margin-top: 0cm" type="disc"><li class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt; tab-stops: list 36.0pt"><span lang="EN-CA"><font size="3"><font face="Times New Roman">Recent Asian (HK, Korea, Japan) blockbusters/commercial releases</font></font></span><li class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt; tab-stops: list 36.0pt"><span lang="EN-CA"><font size="3"><font face="Times New Roman">Classic American film noirs (mainly 40s-60s with some modern movies thrown in)</font></font></span>[/list]<p class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt"><span lang="EN-CA"><font face="Times New Roman" size="3"></font></span></p><p class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt"><span lang="EN-CA"><font size="3"><font face="Times New Roman">I&rsquo;ll post some short comments on movies that warrant them. These are not reviews, if you want to read that just go to imdb.com, lovehkfilms.com, allmovie.com or rottentomatoes.com</font></font></span></p><p class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt"><span lang="EN-CA"><font face="Times New Roman" size="3"></font></span></p><p class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt"><span lang="EN-CA"><font size="3"><font face="Times New Roman">Takeshis/Kitano/2005</font></font></span></p><p class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt"><span lang="EN-CA"><font size="3"><font face="Times New Roman">I finally saw Kitano&rsquo;s latest release and must say I was sorely disappointed. This is probably his weakest release to date (I&rsquo;ve seen everything he&rsquo;s done at least once except getting any). Here&rsquo;s why:</font></font></span></p><p class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt"><span lang="EN-CA"><font face="Times New Roman" size="3"></font></span></p><ul style="margin-top: 0cm" type="disc"><li class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt; tab-stops: list 36.0pt"><span lang="EN-CA"><font size="3"><font face="Times New Roman">It doesn&rsquo;t stand on it&rsquo;s own as it&rsquo;s too self-referential: While I&rsquo;m big on auteur theory and believe cinema is infinitely more rewarding when you follow particular creators who&rsquo;s work you respect, connect with and find thematic bridges from one movie to the next this one is simply unintelligible to someone who is not familiar with Kitano&rsquo;s canon. Thematic connection and recurring obsessions (i.e. the beach in Kitano&rsquo;s movies) is one thing but self-referential laziness is something else entirely</font></font></span><li class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt; tab-stops: list 36.0pt"><span lang="EN-CA"><font size="3"><font face="Times New Roman">It&rsquo;s self-indulgent and an exercise in ego stroking: Kitano&rsquo;s movies are almost always about the giant presence of Kitano the movie persona, his almost autistic attitude and suppressed violence. Takeshis goes one step further and refers to Kitano the entertainer and real-life person. Instead of being an embodiment of hidden urges and social malaise, placing a mirror in front of the audience and making them take a long hard look at themselves he preens in front of the aforementioned mirror, like Tom Cruise on any of his mediocre screen appearances.</font></font></span><li class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt; tab-stops: list 36.0pt"><span lang="EN-CA"><font size="3"><font face="Times New Roman">His treatment of violence is not consistent with his usual approach: Aside from Zatoichi which was a brilliant homage to traditional chambara series, violence and especially gunfights in Kitano movies is static, sad and rather anaesthetic. He really has the ability to take all the excitement and the &ldquo;action&rdquo; aspect out of the equation, letting you see what is really going on: pointless, nonsensical death and killing. This goes out of the window in Takeshis with a beautiful beach scene gun fight. It&rsquo;s not interesting action, it&rsquo;s barely comedy and you&rsquo;re left with an empty scene with no apparent meaning.</font></font></span><li class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt; tab-stops: list 36.0pt"><span lang="EN-CA"><font size="3"><font face="Times New Roman">The dreamlike logic of the movie could be interesting as it allows Kitano to present individual vignettes that really show the strength of his background as a stand up comic. Sadly since these scenes are basically showcases for a particular performer and barely sustain or advance the plot; they don&rsquo;t gel with the overall story or lack of thereof.</font></font></span>[/list]<p class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt 18pt"><span lang="EN-CA"><font face="Times New Roman" size="3"></font></span></p><p class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt 18pt"><span lang="EN-CA"><font size="3"><font face="Times New Roman">In other word watch it if you&rsquo;re big on Kitano and are interested in seeing all his movies otherwise stay away as it&rsquo;s simply not very good.</font></font></span></p>

Fuuma
11-20-2006, 12:18 PM
<p class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt 18pt"><span lang="EN-CA" style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Arial">
I watched Irreversible yesterday. What a gruesome film. I have to say, sometimes I wonder about whether films like these should exist (same goes for something like Requiem for a Dream). The balance of sheer portrayal of violence by far outweighed the social and psychological points the film addressed (revenge, fate, etc.). The camera work was pretty amazing though - a bit too much at times, but mostly well done and innovative.
</span><span style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Arial"></span></p><p class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt 18pt"><span style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Arial"></span></p><p class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt 18pt"><span lang="EN-CA" style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Arial">Requiem for a dream was bad, really bad. &ldquo;Look I&rsquo;m an artist and I&rsquo;m tackling difficult subjects in a super-duper camera god way!!! See those are junkies and there&rsquo;s prostitution too, I&rsquo;m so edgy!! &ldquo;</span></p><p class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt 18pt"><span lang="EN-CA" style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Arial"></span></p><p class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt 18pt"><span lang="EN-CA" style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Arial">I&rsquo;m more ambivalent on irreversible and No&eacute; in general. He&rsquo;s really out to shock us, that&rsquo;s for sure but I feel he has something to say and doesn&rsquo;t go for conventional &ldquo;shock power&rdquo; subjects like young, languid junkies with cool trashed clothes. I admire how he took out all the possible eroticism out of the rape scene to make it almost unwatchable. His first movie &ldquo;Alone against all&rdquo; (is that the english title?) really let you access the protagonist thoughts without any censoring and I think that was quite a bravura performance. By the way Noe&rsquo;s girlfriend (Lucile Hadzihalilovic) made quite an interesting film about Innocence (that&rsquo;s also the title). It&rsquo;s amazing how American viewers will often perceive certain scenes of the movie where young girls are playing in a pond, half-naked (we&rsquo;re talking about young children, not adolescents) as paedophilic in nature while European audiences are like &ldquo;what? Those are little girls; they&rsquo;re playing, nothing special&hellip;&rdquo;.</span><span lang="EN-CA"></span></p>

</p>

Fuuma
11-20-2006, 12:34 PM
yeah... i dunno. actually i just read the other day that de niro was signed on to be in it, but i don&#39;t know for what part. i&#39;m thinking martin sheen&#39;s role? anyway i am looking forward to the good shepard...

so the past week...

watched borat, enjoyed it very much.

watched exiled, i enjoyed this immensley as well. lots of powdered blood (the best kind). pacing was kind of iffy though.

watched my unsubbed copy le deuxieme souffle. i have a subtitled vhs copy somewhere but i don&#39;t think my vcr likes it. i was in montreal last week and i&#39;m preetttyyyy sure i saw a poster for this, but i was half awake so i could&#39;ve dreamt it. anyways it turns out they are remaking this with daniel auteuil as gu. i don&#39;t like the sound of that. monica bellucci is in it also. ALSO, eric cantona is in it, for the football fans. hate man utd. but cantona may be my favorite football player ever.

watched bring me the head of alfredo garcia, which i have always really really loved.

watched you, me and dupree. it was on tv

caught the first 5 minutes of the devil wears prada. heh.</p>

<span lang="EN-CA" style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Arial">I also liked Borat, not an exceptional movie in any way but delivers the laughs. I&rsquo;m really looking forward to Exiled, can you please clarify the link to the mission though; it&rsquo;s supposedly not a sequel but sort of a spin-off/alternate universe thing.</span></p>

<span lang="EN-CA" style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Arial"></span><span lang="EN-CA" style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Arial">I have the Ren&eacute; Ch&acirc;teau release of &ldquo;Le deuxi&egrave;me souffle&rdquo; I&rsquo;ll check if there&rsquo;s english subtitles (some of their releases do, for some reason) if you&rsquo;d like a copy. You would need a player that converts PAL though&hellip;Auteuil as Gu, Belluci as Manouche? Seems like miscasting in action. It&rsquo;s pretty cool that they&rsquo;ve got Dutronc onboard though. The movie is so steeped in pre-war mythic gangster honour and post-war changes that it would probably loose a lot of meaning if it was set today. It seems Alain Corneau is directing so I&rsquo;ll probably check it out anyway.</span></p>

</p>

Fuuma
11-20-2006, 01:49 PM
<p class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt"><span lang="DE"><font size="3"><font face="Times New Roman">Puzzle/Kim Tae-Kyeong/Korea/2006</font></font></span></p><p class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt; text-align: justify"><span lang="DE"><font face="Times New Roman" size="3"></font></span></p><p class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt; text-align: justify"><span lang="EN-CA"><font size="3"><font face="Times New Roman">A heist mystery strongly inspired by the usual suspects (mysterious X behind a convoluted plot that is only revealed gradually, mostly through flashbacks) and reservoir dogs (heist went wrong and black Armani clad characters are stuck in an abandoned warehouse trying to understand what happened and who double-crossed them). It is quite derivative and the ending leaves something to be desired but this is nonetheless an engrossing watch. I tend to favour crime movies as they rely on plot and characterization to drive the story and this one is no exception. Definitely a recommended watch as it&rsquo;s a good example of quality Korean popular cinema.</font></font></span></p>

Fuuma
11-20-2006, 03:21 PM
<p class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt; text-align: justify"><span lang="EN-CA"><font size="3"><font face="Times New Roman">Hoop dreams/USA/James/1994</font></font></span></p><p class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt; text-align: justify"><span lang="EN-CA"><font face="Times New Roman" size="3"></font></span></p><p class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt; text-align: justify"><span lang="EN-CA"><font size="3"><font face="Times New Roman">Fascinating documentary where we follow through three years of high school two young black boys from Chicago&rsquo;s poorer neighbourhood who get to attend a private high school famous for it&rsquo;s basketball team, seen as a gateway to famous colleges and eventually the NBA. This isn&rsquo;t about sports though (would be a yawn fest) but their trials and tribulations and the enormous pressure to perform that is trust upon them at such a young age.</font></font></span></p><p class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt; text-align: justify"><span lang="EN-CA"><font face="Times New Roman" size="3"></font></span></p><p class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt; text-align: justify"><span lang="EN-CA"><font size="3"><font face="Times New Roman">D.O.A./USA/Mat&eacute;/1950</font></font></span></p><p class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt; text-align: justify"><span lang="EN-CA"><font face="Times New Roman" size="3"></font></span></p><p class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt; text-align: justify"><span lang="EN-CA"><font size="3"><font face="Times New Roman">A man stumbles into a police station to report a murder; his own. If that&rsquo;s not enough to pique your interest then I wonder what would work. Don&rsquo;t read additional reviews, this one is enough and leaves you in the dark on crucial plot points.</font></font></span></p><p class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt; text-align: justify"><span lang="EN-CA"><font face="Times New Roman" size="3"></font></span></p><p class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt; text-align: justify"><span lang="EN-CA"><font size="3"><font face="Times New Roman">A bittersweet life/Korea/Kim Ji-Woon/2005</font></font></span></p><p class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt; text-align: justify"><span lang="EN-CA"><font face="Times New Roman" size="3"></font></span></p><p class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt; text-align: justify"><span lang="EN-CA"><font size="3"><font face="Times New Roman">Desensitised, efficient up and coming mob enforcer/club manager finds redemption in the love he has for a woman. He will eventually have to choose between her and his mob bosses-How original!! Kim Ji-Woon is a talented director and this tried and true formula, while lacking in originality, is an interesting vehicle for his stylistic flourishes and skewed vision. The finale is especially enlightening, illuminating the main protagonist in a new light. It is also worth noting how pig-headed and uncompromising most of the characters are, stupidly letting minor situations snowball until they gather enough momentum to become extremely destructive.</font></font></span></p><p class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt; text-align: justify"><span lang="EN-CA"><font face="Times New Roman" size="3"></font></span></p><p class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt; text-align: justify"><span lang="EN-CA"><font size="3"><font face="Times New Roman">Laura/USA/Preminger/1944</font></font></span></p><p class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt; text-align: justify"><span lang="EN-CA"><font face="Times New Roman" size="3"></font></span></p><p class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt; text-align: justify"><span lang="EN-CA"><font size="3"><font face="Times New Roman">NYC socialite Laura is murdered at her posh Manhattan apartment, typical hard-boiled cop handles the investigation but who&rsquo;s responsible for the murder and more importantly is the cop falling for the dead girl? Supporting roles are great with a young Vincent Price playing a kind of high society playboy/gigolo and Clifton Webb in a memorable turn as bitchy dandy star journalist Waldo Lydecker.</font></font></span></p>

mass
11-21-2006, 04:38 AM
<span lang="EN-CA" style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Arial">I also liked Borat, not an exceptional movie in any way but delivers the laughs. I&rsquo;m really looking forward to Exiled, can you please clarify the link to the mission though; it&rsquo;s supposedly not a sequel but sort of a spin-off/alternate universe thing.</span></p>

<span lang="EN-CA" style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Arial"></span><span lang="EN-CA" style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Arial">I have the Ren&eacute; Ch&acirc;teau release of &ldquo;Le deuxi&egrave;me souffle&rdquo; I&rsquo;ll check if there&rsquo;s english subtitles (some of their releases do, for some reason) if you&rsquo;d like a copy. You would need a player that converts PAL though&hellip;Auteuil as Gu, Belluci as Manouche? Seems like miscasting in action. It&rsquo;s pretty cool that they&rsquo;ve got Dutronc onboard though. The movie is so steeped in pre-war mythic gangster honour and post-war changes that it would probably loose a lot of meaning if it was set today. It seems Alain Corneau is directing so I&rsquo;ll probably check it out anyway.</span></p>

</p>


i have the film prestige version, which also defaults to a russian audio track!



the basic premise to exiled is nick cheung is playing jackie liu's character from the mission (they've all got new names anyway). he's in macau with a wife and kid and simon yam has sent anthony wong (& lam suet) to kill him (although not for the same reason as in the mission). i suppose francis ng and roy cheung are there to stop him although all 5 of them are really just there to kick it. you can view it in the same way as tarantino's films, even though this takes place in a different time continuum. anything related to the mission is just a very small part of the film, although it's a set up for the rest of it.



by the way roy cheung is one of 'those' (ie delon, belmondo, etc) actors where i try and watch all his films. unfortunately he has much much more bad ones than the european equivalents; can't blame him though it is hong kong. i think tadanobu asano too. i just remembered i really need to check out that 'follow up' to last life in the universe.




hoop dreams is great. possibly one of my favorite nonanimalrelated documentaries of all time (it obviously loses out to style wars).

Fuuma
11-21-2006, 12:09 PM
<span lang="EN-CA" style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Arial">I also liked Borat, not an exceptional movie in any way but delivers the laughs. I&rsquo;m really looking forward to Exiled, can you please clarify the link to the mission though; it&rsquo;s supposedly not a sequel but sort of a spin-off/alternate universe thing.</span></p>

<span lang="EN-CA" style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Arial"></span><span lang="EN-CA" style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Arial">I have the Ren&eacute; Ch&acirc;teau release of &ldquo;Le deuxi&egrave;me souffle&rdquo; I&rsquo;ll check if there&rsquo;s english subtitles (some of their releases do, for some reason) if you&rsquo;d like a copy. You would need a player that converts PAL though&hellip;Auteuil as Gu, Belluci as Manouche? Seems like miscasting in action. It&rsquo;s pretty cool that they&rsquo;ve got Dutronc onboard though. The movie is so steeped in pre-war mythic gangster honour and post-war changes that it would probably loose a lot of meaning if it was set today. It seems Alain Corneau is directing so I&rsquo;ll probably check it out anyway.</span></p>

</p>

i have the film prestige version, which also defaults to a russian audio track!

the basic premise to exiled is nick cheung is playing jackie liu&#39;s character from the mission (they&#39;ve all got new names anyway). he&#39;s in macau with a wife and kid and simon yam has sent anthony wong (&amp; lam suet) to kill him (although not for the same reason as in the mission). i suppose francis ng and roy cheung are there to stop him although all 5 of them are really just there to kick it. you can view it in the same way as tarantino&#39;s films, even though this takes place in a different time continuum. anything related to the mission is just a very small part of the film, although it&#39;s a set up for the rest of it.

by the way roy cheung is one of &#39;those&#39; (ie delon, belmondo, etc) actors where i try and watch all his films. unfortunately he has much much more bad ones than the european equivalents; can&#39;t blame him though it is hong kong. i think tadanobu asano too. i just remembered i really need to check out that &#39;follow up&#39; to last life in the universe.

hoop dreams is great. possibly one of my favorite nonanimalrelated documentaries of all time (it obviously loses out to style wars).</p><p class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt"><span lang="EN-CA" style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Arial">Is film prestige a company like Russico? Mine is the French R2/PAL version which is pretty no frill but of quite good quality.</span></p><p class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt"><span lang="EN-CA" style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Arial"></span></p><p class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt"><span lang="EN-CA" style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Arial">Exiled: I see, now I&rsquo;m really interested. I recently saw breaking news for a second time and finally watched Election 2. I&rsquo;m on a To roll, so to speak.</span></p><p class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt"><span lang="EN-CA" style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Arial"></span></p><p class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt"><span lang="EN-CA" style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Arial">Roy Cheung is quite underrated, people seem to disregard the fact that while he always plays in the same type of movies, the characters he portrays covers the whole gamut of human sensibilities. I must say the first time I saw him with his bleached air and aging pop star looks I wasn&rsquo;t expecting anything out of him either. The guy isn&rsquo;t all fluff like Koo, Cheng, Kwok, etc&hellip;</span></p><p class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt"><span lang="EN-CA" style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Arial">Asano is good too, did you see him perform in the Doyle movie (Away with words)? That was impressive. I also liked him in &ldquo;taste of tea&rdquo; and a bunch of others. Sadly he shares the Japanese mainstream filmmakers&rsquo; interest in quirk for quirk, which can be extremely annoying at times.</span></p><p class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt"><span lang="EN-CA" style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Arial"></span></p><p class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt"><span lang="EN-CA" style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Arial">Hoop dreams: This was my first viewing so I was impressed. Another documentary I fully stand behind would be &ldquo;Scratch&rdquo;. I&rsquo;ve never seen Style wars, I&rsquo;ll check it out.</span></p>

</p>

mass
11-22-2006, 02:01 AM
does russico only release russian films? i think film prestige is just a general dvd studio. as far as i know they've done (probably barebones) releases of everything from breakfast at tiffany's to alphaville to fearless vampire killers. they have a melville box collection... among others ie fellini, clouzot, visconti, etc. now that i think about it i have no idea why i bought this one over the rene chateau release.



agree on all points about cheung and asano. i think louis koo does have acting talent, but he is just too famous/much of a celebrity now to be a good actor. i liked him in bullets over summer. by cheng you mean ekin? imo that guy doesn't have anything going for him, but who doesn't love the y&d series?

Fuuma
11-22-2006, 09:44 AM
does russico only release russian films? i think film prestige is just a general dvd studio. as far as i know they&#39;ve done (probably barebones) releases of everything from breakfast at tiffany&#39;s to alphaville to fearless vampire killers. they have a melville box collection... among others ie fellini, clouzot, visconti, etc. now that i think about it i have no idea why i bought this one over the rene chateau release.



agree on all points about cheung and asano. i think louis koo does have acting talent, but he is just too famous/much of a celebrity now to be a good actor. i liked him in bullets over summer. by cheng you mean ekin? imo that guy doesn&#39;t have anything going for him, but who doesn&#39;t love the y&amp;d series?</p>

From what I remember russico releases all kind of films. At what time the ren&eacute;-ch&acirc;teau release what out of print but I think they had another run. Got mine in a used dvd store (prices are good in France as the market is quite big) along with the stellar TF1/Ocean In the mood for love release.</p>

I think I saw Bullets over summer but not sure I&#39;m not mistaking it for another of those cop dramas that might have had Anthony Wong instead of Francis Ng in the more experienced cop role. Yeah Y&amp;D rocks but Ekin is so bland I&#39;m sure you&#39;ll agree you watch it for the secondary characters. BTW what&#39;s the title of the last life in the universe follow-up?</p>

I watched Mob sister yesterday and must say that this triad fairytale was a weak directorial attempt a showing up his camera/editing skills and eliptic and symbolic storytelling talents. Lots of good actors but they certainly didn&#39;t impress me in this...I liked the animated parts though, especially the opening.
</p>

mass
11-24-2006, 02:35 AM
BTW what&#39;s the title of the last life in the universe follow-up?</p>

I watched Mob sister yesterday and must say that this triad fairytale was a weak directorial attempt a showing up his camera/editing skills and eliptic and symbolic storytelling talents. Lots of good actors but they certainly didn&#39;t impress me in this...I liked the animated parts though, especially the opening.
</p>

invisible waves (http://www.invisiblewaves.com/)

nairb49
12-03-2006, 07:08 PM
great, really interesting stuff guys. Fuuma, I have added those films to my soon-to-be-seen list!</p>

Last film I saw was Little Miss Sunshine, it was humorous, but thats about it to me. Not bad overall though.</p>

minomni
12-03-2006, 08:27 PM
<span lang="EN-CA" style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Arial">I also liked Borat, not an exceptional movie in any way but delivers the laughs.</span>
</p>

</p>

</p>

i found borat to be utterly disappointing. whatever attempts at satirizing the american psyche fell by the wayside to the overwhelming stupidity that delivered very few laughs for me. consequently, everyone i&#39;ve spoken with regarding the film has ultimately accused me of being completely joyless. [^o)]
</p>

saw babel today. it&#39;s a movie filled with moving scenes. however, like others - i&#39;m not entirely convinced by the way the separate stories are tied together.</p>


last three movies rented:</p>

twilight samurai [tasogare seibei], yoji yamada</p>

primer, shane carruth
</p>

happy together - i haven&#39;t gone through this entire thread, but surely there are some wong kar-wai fans here? [Y]
</p>

xcoldricex
12-03-2006, 09:12 PM
+1 wkw fan. i happen to like fallen angels a lot - which isn&#39;t usually picked out as outstanding among his works.

Faust
12-03-2006, 10:02 PM
+1 wkw fan. i happen to like fallen angels a lot - which isn&#39;t usually picked out as outstanding among his works.
</p>

Yea, I did not like that at all. Maybe it wasn&#39;t a good introduction to WKW for me.</p>

Last one I saw was Remains of the Day. It was amazing. What a strong film. Anthony Hapkins is simply amazing.</p>

</p>

Is anyone else excited that they finally made Perfume into a movie? I loved the book, and I hope Hollywood doesn&#39;t mess it up too much.</p>

mass
12-04-2006, 03:48 AM
+1 wkw fan. i happen to like fallen angels a lot - which isn&#39;t usually picked out as outstanding among his works.


i feel the same way about ashes of time, but i also really like fallen angels.

Faust
12-04-2006, 09:29 PM
I&#39;ve seen Sleeping Beauty 10 times in the last week now. I hate it.

Faust
12-08-2006, 02:23 PM
Got Battle of Algiers sitting at home. Can&#39;t wait to see it.</p>

And, heads up for all you Netflixers. Blockbuster will let you rent a free movie for every Netflix envelope flap you bring them [B]</p>

destroyed
12-10-2006, 06:47 PM
I love Battle of Algiers. Very timely.</p>

</p>

I just watched Tarkovsky&#39;s THE STALKER yesterday. He&#39;s quickly become my favorite director. Something beyond cinema is happening in his films. Right now, Tarkovsky&#39;s THE MIRROR is my favorite film ever.</p>

Seventh
12-10-2006, 07:15 PM
Nice picks, Battle of Algiers and Stalker are two of my favorites. I couldn&#39;t stop thinking about the Battle of Algiers for days after I saw it--it is definately timely. And Stalker is a breathtakingly beautiful and philosophical movie (it is amazing that was filmed before the Chernobyl accident). The ending of Stalker is... words don&#39;t do it justice, but it just flips the whole movie upside down. </p>

Destroyed, have you seen Ivan&#39;s Childhood (I think it has an alternative title possibly, &quot;My Name is Ivan&quot;?) by Tarkovsky? It was one of his earliest film and has a different style, but also a favorite of mine. </p>

I recently watched the Saddest Music in the World --I thought it was OK, had some pretty wonderful images/moments, but I find Guy Maddin irritating sometimes. The next movie I am going to watch is Eraserhead (somehow I have never gotten around to seeing it), and I have high hopes for it!
</p>

destroyed
12-10-2006, 08:59 PM
hmmm... haven&#39;t seen Ivan&#39;s Childhood. strangely www.greencine.com doesn&#39;t have it. must be out of print. will have to seek it out. thank you.</p>

</p>

i had to work really hard to get through Saddest Music in the World-----and i&#39;m not sure it was worth the effort. well, actually, it is quite nice to recall images from it, even if i didn&#39;t enjoy it so much as i watched it.</p>

</p>

i wish i could watch eraserhead for the first time again. love that film------it really changes the viewer. afterward, seek out the song of the same title by bruce mcculloch of kids in the hall. it will take the edge off...</p>

Faust
12-10-2006, 09:10 PM
hmmm... haven&#39;t seen Ivan&#39;s Childhood. strangely www.greencine.com doesn&#39;t have it. must be out of print. will have to seek it out. thank you.</p>

</p>

i had to work really hard to get through Saddest Music in the World-----and i&#39;m not sure it was worth the effort. well, actually, it is quite nice to recall images from it, even if i didn&#39;t enjoy it so much as i watched it.</p>

</p>

i wish i could watch eraserhead for the first time again. love that film------it really changes the viewer. afterward, seek out the song of the same title by bruce mcculloch of kids in the hall. it will take the edge off...</p>

</p>

I can buy it for you - not sure if you&#39;d want to invest, as it is Tarkovsky&#39;s early work as Seventh pointed out, and is much less surrealistic. It&#39;s about WWII.</p>

Stalker is an amazing film. The book is awesome too, but it has a Communist flavor that Tarkovsky successfully took out.</p>

Seventh
12-10-2006, 10:15 PM
Thanks Destroyed, now I am looking forward to eraserhead even more...[:D]</p>



Yes, the Ivan&#39;s Childhood is much more a straight narrative, about an orphan that is, in a way, adopted by Soviet soldiers in WWII. The child actor in &quot;Ivan&#39;s childhood&quot; is the main reason I love the film, an amazing acting performance. He is the opposite of most american child actors, not cute, not very personable, instead filled with such intensity and anger. And yet, still a child at times. Tarkovsky is able to of distill so much of the horror of the war into basically three characters in that movie...
</p>

Faust, what is the book on Stalker? Was it written by Tarkovsky? Still in print?</p>

A tragic thing about Stalker, is that a lot of it was filmed (twice) in real abandoned industrial/chemical plants. I think almost everyone that worked on the film has died (many very young), I have heard that it might have been because of the pollution they were working in.
</p>

destroyed
12-10-2006, 10:43 PM
The book stalker is based on is called Picnic by the Roadway, or somesuch. I wonder if that what the Suede song &quot;picnic by the motorway&quot; is referencing. i&#39;ve never read the book....</p>

faust-----thanks for the offer. i will mull it over.
</p>

Servo2000
12-11-2006, 12:51 AM
I was curious if anyone had heard anything about a film called Old Joy recently. I heard about it as it stars Will Oldham, one of my favorite musicians who truly is one of the few people I&#39;ve heard who is able to spill every bit of himself onto a record, and imagined that it could be something interesting.<div><br class="khtml-block-placeholder" /></div><div>From what I&#39;ve heard, the entire film takes place primarily between two people, who spend the film trying to &quot;catch up&quot; and yet never manage to, and in fact, in the end, realize how little they have in common. It sounds like, if scripted and acted well, that it could be quite a film.</div>

Faust
12-11-2006, 10:29 AM
Thanks Destroyed, now I am looking forward to eraserhead even more...[:D]</p>



Yes, the Ivan&#39;s Childhood is much more a straight narrative, about an orphan that is, in a way, adopted by Soviet soldiers in WWII. The child actor in &quot;Ivan&#39;s childhood&quot; is the main reason I love the film, an amazing acting performance. He is the opposite of most american child actors, not cute, not very personable, instead filled with such intensity and anger. And yet, still a child at times. Tarkovsky is able to of distill so much of the horror of the war into basically three characters in that movie...
</p>

Faust, what is the book on Stalker? Was it written by Tarkovsky? Still in print?</p>

A tragic thing about Stalker, is that a lot of it was filmed (twice) in real abandoned industrial/chemical plants. I think almost everyone that worked on the film has died (many very young), I have heard that it might have been because of the pollution they were working in.
</p>

</p>

Destroyed got the title right. It&#39;s written by the most famous Russian science fiction writers, brothers Strugatsky. Here is an entry from Wikipedia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Strugatsky_brothers). They wrote some amazing books. I wish someone did a film on It&#39;s Hard to be God. It&#39;s an incredible book - it&#39;s two main themes are impossibility of remaining Human in the face of barbarity, and on difficulties in trying to speed up a process of developing nations (just look at all the fuckups of the Europeans and Americans in Africa).
</p>

destroyed
12-11-2006, 11:37 AM
speaking of books and cinema, has anyone read Klaus Kinski&#39;s autobiography? i&#39;ve been trying to get my hands on it but it is OOP and hard to find at that.
</p>


follow up question: any pick up the herzog &quot;SHORTS AND DOCUMENTARIES&quot; box? i am hoping that it will be under the xmas tree this year, but i have my doubts...</p>

designersheep
12-11-2006, 05:41 PM
Satantango

A 7.5 hour (!) film by Bela Tarr, finally came out on DVD (R2 UK available in Amazon UK).
I&#39;ve been waiting for this film for so long and finally had the chance to watch it. The film has two intermissions, and the DVD is divided into 3 discs by those intermissions.

I wouldn&#39;t go into too much details, but it was an astonishing one of a kind experience. The plot could be shown in a regular length film, but Tarr makes use of extreme long takes and endlessly stretched scenes of mundane (there are number of scenes of people walking for 10 minutes, and then there is the repeatitive drunk dance sequence which lasts over 30 min and so on), and totally distorts the viewers&#39; senses of time and space. That said, the film is never boring; each seemingly endless sequence gave me inexplicable catharsis of being thrown into a middle of &#39;Infinity&#39; itself and those scenes have totally hypnotic qualities. It&#39;s not just that though. The film does have a plot, with interwining stories and overlapping times. A dream for a narratology junky like me.

It is hard to give rational analysis of why this film works other than the technical excellence. But I have one theory. Going back to the walking example, in this film we see actors walking down the road for literally 10 minutes to go from one place to another. Since we have the whole event instead of small snippets of an event, film watching becomes &#39;knowing&#39; from &#39;thinking&#39;. We know that A walked from a place to another, we know that something something happened, and so on. The film no longer is an act, but becomes something more real, hence the viewers are extremely drawn in.

Also, the actings are flawless, and every frame is beautiful to look at. Hypnotic atmospheric music is amazing. Even the cows, pigs, dogs, and horses act amazing. There really are scenes that just makes you say &#39;there is no way this scene had been scripted&#39;. Can&#39;t say enough about this film.

DVD Beaver review (http://www.dvdbeaver.com/film2/DVDreviews26/satantango.htm)
imdb link (http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0111341/)
Amazon UK link (http://www.amazon.co.uk/Satantango/dp/B000HRLWQM/sr=8-1/qid=1165876783/ref=pd_ka_1/026-5010826-1530865?ie=UTF8&amp;s=dvd)





Hi Jun, welcome!. Great to have yet another film lover onboard!

I second the suggestion of Kiarostami, Ozu, Bresson and pretty much everyone else you mentionned. However, in a sense, those are pretty safe choices among the film loving set. They&#39;re great as recommendations and because these directors are genuinely good and involving (you might have noted that the majority of directors you mentionned are also on the list I made even though I only named 100 films) but I believe you understand a lot about a cinephile by hearing about the lesser-known/generally disliked or at least not highly considered movies they love. Or even about the masters/classics they dislike (I should post about why, while I rank most of Bresson&#39;s movies I&#39;ve seen from good to incredible, I&#39;m not too found of Au hazard Balthazar and it&#39;s christ-like donkey). You might have seen, for exemple, that I genuinely enjoyed the Belmondo vehicule &quot;Le magnifique&quot; (and countless others Belmondo movies for that matter) or British crime movie &quot;Get carter&quot;. Those are personal choices that I&#39;m not sure many cinephile share or recognize as favorites. So I&#39;m wondering what are your own cinematic &quot;quirks&quot;.


Hey, sorry about slow reply. I somehow never got back to this thread after my own posting :)

I&#39;d say most of my film preferences are SAFE among the film loving set. I tend to like (or at least respect) directors who are consistent with his/her own vision and style, and unique enough to look at a work and feel their signatures all over. As much as I love &#39;Au hasard Balthazar&#39;, most of the time I wouldn&#39;t be in the mood to watch such film. So I go by periods where I feel like watching a Kiarostami, and then a week goes by and feel like watching a Melvielle etc.

Well, maybe because I highly regard uniqueness so much that, I just can&#39;t seem to enjoy the masters who had the widest influence on mainstream cinema. I would say Hitchcock, Griffith, Welles, Ford, and Kurosawa are examples of this. They did make great films and I did enjoy them, but they&#39;ve been copied by so many other directors that I don&#39;t feel the magic I get with watching a Tarkovsky or a Bergman etc. I mean, Tarkovsky, Bergman, Godard, and Bresson were all influential in their own ways, but they all had their own language of cinema which couldn&#39;t easily be translated into wide audiences; therefore the influence goes like Bergman to Tarkovsky to Tarr etc rather than Hitchcock to Melvielle and the rest of the whodunnit crew.

Well, I am increasingly having aversion to most of the Hollywood stuff, and I just can&#39;t seem to enjoy films made to entertain. I get entertained by films that does not want to entertain :P

I&#39;ll give more thoughts and give you a better answer if I come up with one. I think my taste is rather too safe among those Tarkovsky/Ozu/Kiarostami/Godard loving film fans.

Fuuma
12-12-2006, 02:38 PM
<p class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt"><span style="font-size: 10pt; color: black">Detour/Ulmer/USA/19</span></p><p class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt"><span lang="EN-CA" style="font-size: 10pt">One of the biggest bang for the buck ever made, with a budget under 30k (if I remember correctly). Great, tightly paced noir with a memorable variation of the classic femme fatale who replaced her habitual sultriness with a harsh and fretful personality that is a pleasure to behold, from the viewer seat that is&hellip;</span></p><p class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt"><span lang="EN-CA" style="font-size: 10pt; color: black"></span></p><p class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt"><span lang="EN-CA" style="font-size: 10pt; color: black"></span></p><p class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt"><span lang="EN-CA" style="font-size: 10pt; color: black">Marie-Antoinette/Coppola/USA/2006
</span><span lang="EN-CA" style="font-size: 10pt">I saw this one yesterday; here are a few random thoughts:</span></p><p class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt"><span lang="EN-CA" style="font-size: 10pt"></span></p><p class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt 18pt; text-indent: -18pt; tab-stops: list 18.0pt"><span lang="EN-CA" style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Symbol"><span>&middot;<span style="font: 7pt 'Times New Roman'"> </span></span></span><span dir="ltr"><span lang="EN-CA" style="font-size: 10pt">More about themes than any sort of well constructed storyline, definitely a mood piece where the connection is/isn&rsquo;t made on an emotional level</span></span></p><p class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt 18pt; text-indent: -18pt; tab-stops: list 18.0pt"><span lang="EN-CA" style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Symbol"><span>&middot;<span style="font: 7pt 'Times New Roman'"> </span></span></span><span dir="ltr"><span lang="EN-CA" style="font-size: 10pt">This is really Coppola&rsquo;s personal viewpoint; the movie is thankfully not about history. Americans tend to approach French history from a weird angle anyway + the past should be treated with the same range as the present, otherwise all you can get out of it are &ldquo;historical films&rdquo; which greatly limit creativity.</span></span></p><p class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt 18pt; text-indent: -18pt; tab-stops: list 18.0pt"><span lang="EN-CA" style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Symbol"><span>&middot;<span style="font: 7pt 'Times New Roman'"> </span></span></span><span dir="ltr"><span lang="EN-CA" style="font-size: 10pt">I liked the inclusion of modern songs on the soundtrack, combined with some of the very creative cinematography they turned parts of the film in very effective videoclips</span></span></p><p class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt 18pt; text-indent: -18pt; tab-stops: list 18.0pt"><span lang="EN-CA" style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Symbol"><span>&middot;<span style="font: 7pt 'Times New Roman'"> </span></span></span><span dir="ltr"><span lang="EN-CA" style="font-size: 10pt">Successfully relayed the feeling of infantilism you get from a social class which, having stopped having any usefulness long ago, pass the time by endlessly complicating<span> </span>human interactions to an extreme level, making their make-believe world almost impenetrable to outsiders.</span></span></p><p class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt 18pt; text-indent: -18pt; tab-stops: list 18.0pt"><span lang="EN-CA" style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Symbol"><span>&middot;<span style="font: 7pt 'Times New Roman'"> </span></span></span><span dir="ltr"><span lang="EN-CA" style="font-size: 10pt">I saw the French dub version, a rarity for the film purist that I am. I must say American accents would have killed it for me so this was probably a benediction</span></span></p><p class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt 18pt; text-indent: -18pt; tab-stops: list 18.0pt"><span lang="EN-CA" style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Symbol"><span>&middot;<span style="font: 7pt 'Times New Roman'"> </span></span></span><span dir="ltr"><span lang="EN-CA" style="font-size: 10pt">Lots of close-up, camera movements; a restless and youthful realization that fits the piece very well</span></span></p><p class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt 18pt; text-indent: -18pt; tab-stops: list 18.0pt"><span lang="EN-CA" style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Symbol"><span>&middot;<span style="font: 7pt 'Times New Roman'"> </span></span></span><span dir="ltr"><span lang="EN-CA" style="font-size: 10pt">The fluff dosage was very high but palatable, contrary to let&rsquo;s say Baz Lhurmann baroque monstrosity (Moulin Rouge)</span></span></p><p class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt 18pt; text-indent: -18pt; tab-stops: list 18.0pt"><span lang="EN-CA" style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Symbol"><span>&middot;<span style="font: 7pt 'Times New Roman'"> </span></span></span><span dir="ltr"><span lang="EN-CA" style="font-size: 10pt">While it wasn&rsquo;t boring (maybe a tad too long though, could have benefited from a more disciplined editing), it has about as much significance as &ldquo;Girls just wanna have fun&rdquo;, but, while you never think about it, you do bob your head to that song when it plays, do you?</span></span></p><p class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt 18pt; text-indent: -18pt; tab-stops: list 18.0pt"><span lang="EN-CA" style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Symbol"><span>&middot;<span style="font: 7pt 'Times New Roman'"> </span></span></span><span dir="ltr"><span lang="EN-CA" style="font-size: 10pt">If you want to see an infinitely better film about the French court of that time (well slightly earlier) just rent Ridicule by Leconte</span></span></p><p class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt"><span lang="EN-CA" style="font-size: 10pt; color: black"></span></p><p class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt"><span lang="EN-CA" style="font-size: 10pt; color: black"></span></p><p class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt"><span lang="EN-CA" style="font-size: 10pt; color: black">Love/Juice/Shindo/Japan/2000</span></p><p class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt"><span lang="EN-CA" style="font-size: 10pt">Two girls are roommates, sleep in the same bed, work at the same place and go out to drug fuelled techno clubs together. One is a whimsical incarnation of feminity while her boyish friend is a more straightforward character whose unreciprocated feelings for girl A are slowly tearing apart. The movie is basically about their symbiotic relationship and the various feeling and tensions that lie underneath the carefree exterior. I like the grainier, naturalistic look of the film, miles away from the typical Japanese overproduced movies. I guess you could classify this as a gay and lesbian film, however this label tends to separate these from other love/relationship movies, a situation akin to how the ethnic character meet his love interest (of the same race, of course) as an afterthought in season 2 of a typical soap/drama.</span></p>

xcoldricex
12-12-2006, 04:18 PM
Satantango

A 7.5 hour (!) film by Bela Tarr, finally came out on DVD (R2 UK available in Amazon UK).
I&#39;ve been waiting for this film for so long and finally had the chance to watch it. The film has two intermissions, and the DVD is divided into 3 discs by those intermissions.

I wouldn&#39;t go into too much details, but it was an astonishing one of a kind experience. The plot could be shown in a regular length film, but Tarr makes use of extreme long takes and endlessly stretched scenes of mundane (there are number of scenes of people walking for 10 minutes, and then there is the repeatitive drunk dance sequence which lasts over 30 min and so on), and totally distorts the viewers&#39; senses of time and space. That said, the film is never boring; each seemingly endless sequence gave me inexplicable catharsis of being thrown into a middle of &#39;Infinity&#39; itself and those scenes have totally hypnotic qualities. It&#39;s not just that though. The film does have a plot, with interwining stories and overlapping times. A dream for a narratology junky like me.


</p>

sounds like a tsai ming-liang movie to me. haha.
</p>

destroyed
12-12-2006, 04:25 PM
i was about to add satantango to my greencine queue, but the release date was pushed back to January 1, 2099-----------maybe if my brain is kept alive in a jar....

Fuuma
12-12-2006, 06:18 PM
I was curious if anyone had heard anything about a film called Old Joy recently. I heard about it as it stars Will Oldham, one of my favorite musicians who truly is one of the few people I&#39;ve heard who is able to spill every bit of himself onto a record, and imagined that it could be something interesting. <div><br class="khtml-block-placeholder" /></div><div>From what I&#39;ve heard, the entire film takes place primarily between two people, who spend the film trying to &quot;catch up&quot; and yet never manage to, and in fact, in the end, realize how little they have in common. It sounds like, if scripted and acted well, that it could be quite a film.</div>

</p>

Heard about it, don&#39;t have much to say except that it piqued my interest. If you end up watching it feel free to post some feedback I&#39;d love to hear about it.</p>

Fuuma
12-13-2006, 10:55 AM
<p class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt"><span lang="EN-CA" style="font-size: 10pt"><font face="Times New Roman">Haibane Renmei/Tomokazu Tokoro/Japan/2002</font></span></p><p class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt"><span lang="EN-CA" style="font-size: 10pt"><font face="Times New Roman">I&rsquo;ve watched eps 1-7 (out of 13) of this intriguing animation series and can&rsquo;t make up my mind if it&rsquo;s a fantasy fairytale or an existentialist allegory, right now it could go either, or both, ways. One of the mysterious social rule the characters have to follow (aside from not being able to get out of the town/not knowing what lies beyond the town walls) is that they can only wear and use recycled objects, basically material discarded by humans, which makes for interesting design and themes.</font></span></p><p class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt"><span lang="EN-CA" style="font-size: 10pt"><font face="Times New Roman"></font></span></p><p class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt"><span lang="EN-CA" style="font-size: 10pt"><font face="Times New Roman">Shinobi/Shimoyama/Japan/2005</font></span></p><p class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt"><span lang="EN-CA" style="font-size: 10pt"><font face="Times New Roman">Big budget superhero (Ninjas with supernatural powers, makes no difference) action movie that&rsquo;s a lot better than X-Men because the narrative isn&rsquo;t cluttered with useless characters because &ldquo;they&rsquo;re in the comics and the fans want to see them + we can&rsquo;t kill anyone!!&rdquo;. The title sucks though, they should have called the film &ldquo;Kickass Ninja battle to the death, yeah!&rdquo; or something similar. There&rsquo;s also a Romeo/Juliet type love story in here to please the female audience, which shows how calculated this release is, but don&rsquo;t let that spoil your enjoyment.</font></span></p>

interman
12-24-2006, 05:37 PM
<span style="font-weight: bold;">The Pursuit of Happyness/Gabriele Muccino/USA/2006</span>
Great movie where Will Smith stars as the father of a five year old who is indeed pursuing happiness during the early 80s. He works as a salesman of some medical machine, and isn't really doing too well, much to the dismay of his wife, well played by (typically) lovely Thandie Newton. One day he notices that stock brokers seem to have achieved happiness, so that's the path he tries for himself, along with selling the machines, barely having enough money for food, and a wife who's less than appreciative.</p>

Definitely worth checking out.</p>

Faust
12-28-2006, 10:56 AM
Shit - I look forward to like one film every two years (in this case, Perfume - came out yesterday), and the NY Times just annihilated it. Grrrrr....

destroyed
12-28-2006, 11:11 AM
i viewed "touch of evil" a couple days ago</p>

that one really stayed with me afterward; orson welles is just grotesque------he looks like a corpse that had been floating in the river for days. there's a scene right in the middle with a very long take with the camera dollying back and forth through three rooms of a small apartment, maybe 11 pages of dialog. i like films such as this one that explore morality, doing the wrong things for the right reasons, ends justifying the means, and such.
</p>

some films, i barely remember after the fact.</p>

oh, and i watched "black christmas" again over the holidays, not realizing that i had seen it either last christmas, or the christmas before (drugs); but the flick is good. the slasher film that set the mold-----you can really see the influence on everything that came after. and any film with JOHN SAXON is worth seeking out.</p>

interman
12-28-2006, 04:21 PM
Shit - I look forward to like one film every two years (in this case, Perfume - came out yesterday), and the NY Times just annihilated it. Grrrrr....
</p>

I watched Perfume a while ago (thanks internet!) and liked it a lot, though I kind of collect colognes so I'm not the most objective. Put the book on my Amazon wishlist because of it. Still, I can see why someone would dislike it.
</p>


</p>

Faust
12-28-2006, 04:26 PM
Shit - I look forward to like one film every two years (in this case, Perfume - came out yesterday), and the NY Times just annihilated it. Grrrrr....
</p>

I watched Perfume a while ago (thanks internet!) and liked it a lot, though I kind of collect colognes so I'm not the most objective. Put the book on my Amazon wishlist because of it. Still, I can see why someone would dislike it.
</p>


</p>

</p>

Are you sure we are talking about the same film (http://imdb.com/title/tt0396171/)? </p>

BTW, You should post in our fragrances thread. </p>

mass
12-28-2006, 05:12 PM
i viewed "touch of evil" a couple days ago</p>

that one really stayed with me afterward; orson welles is just grotesque------he looks like a corpse that had been floating in the river for days. there's a scene right in the middle with a very long take with the camera dollying back and forth through three rooms of a small apartment, maybe 11 pages of dialog. i like films such as this one that explore morality, doing the wrong things for the right reasons, ends justifying the means, and such.
</p>

touch of evil is one of my favorites... also love the reference to it in ed wood as well!




a few days ago i went through the first 2 seasons of deadwood in 1 sitting... can't wait for season 3 on dvd. the wire is still my favorite though.

interman
12-29-2006, 10:34 AM
Are you sure we are talking about the same film (http://imdb.com/title/tt0396171/)?</p>

Yep, a telecine (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Telecine) version was released in late october.</p>



BTW, You should post in our fragrances thread.
</p>

Will do. Didn't notice it.
</p>

Faust
12-29-2006, 11:15 AM
Holy Shit, I am so seeing this. Wow, simply stunning...</p>

http://panslabyrinth.com/</p>

</p>

interman
12-29-2006, 12:39 PM
Wow that looks good. Will definitely check it out.</p>

I watched Idiocracy (http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0387808/) today. Reasonably funny movie, and the concept didn't suck. Some people seem to love it and it seems to be doing okay with the critics, but in my opinion it doesn't deserve its current imdb score.
</p>

Faust
01-03-2007, 04:09 PM
Holy Shit, I am so seeing this. Wow, simply stunning...</p>

http://panslabyrinth.com/</p>

</p>

Ok, I did go see it. Thematically it reminds me of Life is Beautiful, but visually it's a totally different experience. A really beautiful and deep film. Thumbs up.
</p>

sbw4224
01-03-2007, 05:21 PM
Pan's Labyrinth looks amazing. I hope it comes around to CT eventually. </p>

</p>

I don't know if this has been mentioned before, but I just watched Seven Samurai. Definitely the best samurai movie I've ever seen. </p>

interman
01-03-2007, 05:45 PM
Have you seen The Twilight Samurai (http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0351817/)? It ranks extremely highly on my favorite samurai movie list.

sbw4224
01-03-2007, 06:00 PM
I've never heard of it, but it'll be next on my list to see. Thanks man!

nairb49
01-10-2007, 08:44 AM
man, so many movies for me to watch. I need to be schooled on cinema.

laika
01-10-2007, 08:52 AM
Cannot wait to see Pan's Labyrinth!</p>

This weekend I watched Le Samourai .
</p>

Faust
01-10-2007, 09:31 AM
/\ you'll love it.</p>

There are a lot of Samurai movies in this thread! </p>

I have Naked Lunch sitting in my house. I'm afraid to start watching it, lol.</p>

xcoldricex
01-10-2007, 09:32 AM
past few days: motel, clean, parts of my life as mcdull (ha).

Fuuma
01-10-2007, 01:28 PM
past few days: motel, clean, parts of my life as mcdull (ha).
</P>


You finally watched Clean, so what did you think?</P>


Twillight Samurai is pretty good, I recently watched Koreeda's latest (Hana Yori Mo Naho) which is inthe same vein (a deconstructing of the samurai myth, set during the "twillight" of their social class and almost devoid of violent altercations).</P>

Fuuma
01-10-2007, 01:30 PM
Shit - I look forward to like one film every two years (in this case, Perfume - came out yesterday), and the NY Times just annihilated it. Grrrrr....
</P>
<P mce_keep="true"></P>


So did you end up seeing it anyway, I've yet to watch Perfume, Pan's labyrinth and Babel so reviews would be appreciated.</P>

Faust
01-10-2007, 02:23 PM
Shit - I look forward to like one film every two years (in this case, Perfume - came out yesterday), and the NY Times just annihilated it. Grrrrr....
</p>



So did you end up seeing it anyway, I've yet to watch Perfume, Pan's labyrinth and Babel so reviews would be appreciated.</p>

</p>

No, I haven't. I'll wait for it on DVD - I have full trust in Mr. A.O.Scott, moreover that he's read the book and mirrored my reaction to it.</p>

You should go see Pan's Labyrinth. It's a visually stunning film, and has depth. I heard Babel was very good as well, although very heavy (but that's the director's style).</p>

interman
01-12-2007, 04:08 PM
The Painted Veil. Good movie. Pretty sure you guys will like it.

Faust
01-12-2007, 04:13 PM
Started watching Naked Lunch. FREAKY. No wonder they took Burroughs to court.

Fuuma
01-15-2007, 11:44 AM
eventually i would love to see a (for example) top 10 list of favorite films &amp; filmmakers from everybody...! just the mention of riffifi puts that song right back in my head...</P>
<P mce_keep="true"></P>


This was a pretty good idea...</P>

Faust
01-15-2007, 12:15 PM
eventually i would love to see a (for example) top 10 list of favorite films &amp; filmmakers from everybody...! just the mention of riffifi puts that song right back in my head...</p>



This was a pretty good idea...</p>

</p>

All right, all right.</p>

Top ten films (I will end commentary at a more idle time).</p>

1. Seven - USA.</p>

2. Dogville - Denmark.</p>

3. Pulp Fiction - USA.</p>

4. Reservoir Dogs - USA.</p>

5. Snatch - UK</p>

6. Baraka - USA</p>

7. Stalker - Soviet Union</p>

8. Solaris - Soviet Union</p>

9. Lost Highway - USA</p>

10. HurlyBurly - USA</p>

It's a bipolar list - on one hand I like theater as film (dogville, hurlyburly, reservoir dogs), on the other hand I like films that although have depth, inevitably have an element of entertainment and freakishness (pulp fiction, lost highway, seven...).</p>

Filmmarkers:</p>

1. Andrey Tarkovskiy</p>

2. Lars von Trier
</p>

3. Wim Wenders</p>

4. Jean-Pierre Jeunet / Marc Caro
</p>

5. Terry Gilliam (NOT for the Monty Python)
</p>

6. David Lynch</p>

7. David Cronenberg</p>

8. Federico Fellini</p>

9. Stanley Kubrick</p>

10. Quentin Tarantino
</p>

mass
01-15-2007, 06:11 PM
films...



1 le samourai - melville - fr

2 taxi driver - scorsese - us

3 le notte - antonioni - it

4 chinatown - polanski - us

5 winter light - bergman - se

6 branded to kill - suzuki - jp

7 nostalghia - tarkovsky - ru

8 wild strawberries - bergman - se

9 teorema - pasolini - it

0 blue velvet - lynch - us



directors... in no order.



michelangelo antonioni - it

yasujiro ozu - jp

robert bresson - fr

sam peckinpah - us

federico fellini - it

orson welles - us

luchino visconti - it

jules dassin - us

johnnie to - hk

jean luc godard - fr

Fuuma
01-15-2007, 06:15 PM
films...

1 le samourai - melville - fr
2 taxi driver - scorsese - us
3 le notte - antonioni - it
4 chinatown - polanski - us
5 winter light - bergman - se
6 branded to kill - suzuki - jp
7 nostalghia - tarkovsky - ru
8 wild strawberries - bergman - se
9 teorema - pasolini - it
0 blue velvet - lynch - us

directors... in no order.

michelangelo antonioni - it
yasujiro ozu - jp
robert bresson - fr
sam peckinpah - us
federico fellini - it
orson welles - us
luchino visconti - it
jules dassin - us
johnnie to - hk
jean luc godard - fr
</P>


Our taste is so much alike it's quite impressive....btw are you in Montréal now, we shouldcatch a movie at some point during the next weeks/months.</P>

designersheep
01-15-2007, 07:56 PM
^^^ Wow so is mine :) Are you two by any chance members of www.criterionforum.org (/forums/www.criterionforum.org) ?

Films:

Au hasard Balthazar - Robert Bresson - France
Kohker trilogy - Abbas Kiarostami - Iran
Zerkalo (Mirror) - Andrei Tarkovsky - Russia
Satantango - Bela Tarr - Hungary
Ukigusa (Floating weeds) - Ozu Yasujiro - Japan
Scenes from a marriage - Ingmar Bergman - Sweden
Pierrot le fou - Jean-Luc Godard - France
L'eclisse - Michelangelo Antonioni - Italy
4 Adventures of Reinette and Mirabelle - Eric Rohmer - France
Woman of the dunes - Teshigahara Hiroshi - Japan

Directors:

Tarkovsky, Bresson, Kiarostami, Godard, Bergman, Bunuel, Ozu, Rohmer, Mohsen Makhmalbaf, and Tarr

both in vague order

Seventh
01-15-2007, 09:05 PM
Great movie lists, I need to see many of the ones mentioned.
</p>

Destroyed, I finally saw Eraserhead. Wonderfully strange, i don't really have words for the whole experience, except it was great and there are so many images that linger in my head.
</p>


I'll contribute my top-10 movies:</p>

1. The Killing of a Chinese Bookie<span style="font-style: italic;"> </span>- John Cassavetes
<span style="font-style: italic;"></span>1 1/2. A Woman Under the Influence<span style="font-style: italic;"> </span>- John Cassavetes
2. Ivan's Childhood <span style="font-style: italic;">also titled</span> My Name is Ivan - Andrei Tarkovsky
3. La Promesse - Jean-Pierre Dardenne &amp; Luc Dardenne
4. The Enigma of Kaspar Hauser - Werner Herzog
5. Mother and Son - Aleksandr Sokurov
6. Throne of Blood - Akira Kurosawa
7. All About My Mother - Pedro Almodovar
8. Secrets and Lies - Mike Leigh
9. Down By Law - Jim Jarmusch
10. Alice in the Cities - Wim Wenders</p>

Plus two TV shows that should be considered in the realm of great movies:
1. Twin Peaks - David Lynch
2. The Kingdom: Series 1 &amp; 2 - Lars von Trier

Directors: All the above, plus Renior, Ozu and Kieslowski.



</p>

mass
01-17-2007, 10:54 AM
</P>


Our taste is so much alike it's quite impressive....btw are you in Montréal now, we shouldcatch a movie at some point during the next weeks/months.</P>

that would be cool, hopefully when it gets warmer soon. but yeah i've been braving the "it's actually pretty mild for january" montreal cold for close to a month now.



i also really love cassavetes the director but i think he annoys me so much as an actor that i tend to overlook him! i really like sidney lumet, too.

Faust
01-24-2007, 02:29 PM
Has anyone seen I am Sam? Reviews? Thanks.

Fuuma
01-24-2007, 06:49 PM
Has anyone seen I am Sam? Reviews? Thanks.
</P>


It's a minor Lee, with a familiar setting; urban, working class neighborhood where tensions and general intolerance"heat up" during a heatwave. I found it enjoyable as Lee cleverly dissects the social dynamics on his setting and how they can lead to a mob mentality if the conditions are right. Some of the italo-american stereotypes he serves can be a bit tedious and evenborderline racist which is annoying at times.</P>

Fuuma
01-24-2007, 06:53 PM
Has anyone seen I am Sam? Reviews? Thanks.
</P>


It's a minor Lee, with a familiar setting; urban, working class neighborhood where tensions and general intolerance"heat up" during a heatwave. I found it enjoyable as Lee cleverly dissects the social dynamics on his setting and how they can lead to a mob mentality if the conditions are right. Some of the italo-american stereotypes he serves can be a bit tedious and evenborderline racist which is annoying at times.</P>


OOps I just realized I was talking about Summer of Sam, isn't I am Sam one of those "retard movies" that are pathetic oscar-bait and an insult to anyone who has or know people with disabilities? If you want to watch a great movie that touches, among other topics, the lives of people with disabilities, get Oasis by Lee-Chang-Dong, you'll be floored.</P>

Fuuma
01-24-2007, 06:55 PM
<P mce_keep="true"></P>


Our taste is so much alike it's quite impressive....btw are you in Montréal now, we shouldcatch a movie at some point during the next weeks/months.</P>


that would be cool, hopefully when it gets warmer soon. but yeah i've been braving the "it's actually pretty mild for january" montreal cold for close to a month now.

i also really love cassavetes the director but i think he annoys me so much as an actor that i tend to overlook him! i really like sidney lumet, too.</P>
<P mce_keep="true"></P>


Isn't he prettysolid in "the killers"?</P>
<P mce_keep="true"></P>


BTW everyone go rent Rois et Reine (Kings and Queen) by Arnaud Desplechin, its even better than Esther Khan.</P>

Fuuma
01-24-2007, 07:03 PM
^^^ Wowsoismine:) Are you two by any chance members of www.criterionforum.org (http://stylezeitgeist.com/forums/www.criterionforum.org) ?

Films:

Au hasard Balthazar - Robert Bresson - France
Kohker trilogy - Abbas Kiarostami - Iran
Zerkalo (Mirror) - Andrei Tarkovsky - Russia
Satantango - Bela Tarr - Hungary
Ukigusa (Floating weeds) - Ozu Yasujiro - Japan
Scenes from a marriage - Ingmar Bergman - Sweden
Pierrot le fou - Jean-Luc Godard - France
L'eclisse - Michelangelo Antonioni - Italy
4 Adventures of Reinette and Mirabelle - Eric Rohmer - France
Woman of the dunes - Teshigahara Hiroshi - Japan

Directors:

Tarkovsky, Bresson, Kiarostami, Godard, Bergman,Bunuel,Ozu,Rohmer,Mohsen Makhmalbaf,and Tarr

both in vague order
</P>


Interesting lists (including everyone who posted not just designersheep).</P>


I wouldn't say our taste is that similar, although we both obviously appreciate cinema as an art form and not as simple entertainment. I really like the inclusion of Woman in the dunes, Teshigahara also adapted a great book by japanese author Yasushi Inoue (Rikyu) that I would recommend.</P>

kamsky
01-25-2007, 07:08 PM
after wanting to see it for about two years, i finally saw philippe garrel's 'les amants réguliers' yesterday (it's being shown at the cinema village).<DIV><BR class="khtml-block-placeholder"></DIV><DIV>louis garrel's performance aside, it was very disappointing, in my estimation.</DIV><DIV><BR class="khtml-block-placeholder"></DIV><DIV>has anyone else seen it? if so, i'd be interested to know what you've thought of it.</DIV>

destroyed
01-28-2007, 08:05 PM
watched pandora's box by g.w. pabst last night</p>

great film, surprisingly brutal
</p>

louise moore is extremely watchable; going to seek out more of her flicks

http://img183.imageshack.us/img183/43/pandora1un0.jpg</p>

interman
02-03-2007, 08:26 AM
My last three: Pan's Labyrinth, The Last King of Scotland, and The Lives of Others (Das Leben der Anderen), and they were all great in their own way.

Servo2000
02-07-2007, 12:16 AM
I just finished Jarmusch's Dead Man. You know, the one with Depp in it that barely made a million? I enjoyed it thoroughly, the soundtrack alone was incredible.

nairb49
02-07-2007, 08:24 AM
^^One of my very favorites. Depp is amazing here. </p>

</p>

Faust-re: I am Sam</p>

Its so-so for me. Its very hollywood and a bit contrived, and personally I can't stand Dakota Fanning anymore after having seen an interview with her. </p>

That said, it gets the message across.
</p>

Faust
02-07-2007, 09:23 AM
/\ yea, i think i'll skip.</p>

Dead Man was good? It's one of those movies that I constantly take in my hands at blockbuster and put it back. i'll add it to my netflix cue.</p>

I should be getting Kiki's Delivery Service today from netflix. i don't know who's more excited, my daughter or me.</p>

destroyed
02-07-2007, 10:05 AM
RE: the title of this thread

</p>

Minnesota declaration: truth and fact in documentary cinema
"LESSONS OF DARKNESS"

</p>

1. By dint of declaration the so-called Cinema Verité is devoid of verité. It reaches a merely superficial truth, the truth of accountants.

</p>

2. One well-known representative of Cinema Verité declared publicly that truth can be easily found by taking a camera and trying to be honest. He resembles the night watchman at the Supreme Court who resents the amount of written law and legal procedures. "For me," he says, "there should be only one single law: the bad guys should go to jail."
Unfortunately, he is part right, for most of the many, much of the time.

</p>

3. Cinema Verité confounds fact and truth, and thus plows only stones. And yet, facts sometimes have a strange and bizarre power that makes their inherent truth seem unbelievable.

</p>


4. Fact creates norms, and truth illumination.

</p>


5. There are deeper strata of truth in cinema, and there is such a thing as poetic, ecstatic truth. It is mysterious and elusive, and can be reached only through fabrication and imagination and stylization.

</p>

6. Filmmakers of Cinema Verité resemble tourists who take pictures amid ancient ruins of facts.

</p>

7. Tourism is sin, and travel on foot virtue.

8. Each year at springtime scores of people on snowmobiles crash through the melting ice on the lakes of Minnesota and drown. Pressure is mounting on the new governor to pass a protective law. He, the former wrestler and bodyguard, has the only sage answer to this: "You can´t legislate stupidity."

</p>

9. The gauntlet is hereby thrown down.

</p>

10. The moon is dull. Mother Nature doesn´t call, doesn´t speak to you, although a glacier eventually farts. And don´t you listen to the Song of Life.

</p>

11. We ought to be grateful that the Universe out there knows no smile.

</p>

12. Life in the oceans must be sheer hell. A vast, merciless hell of permanent and immediate danger. So much of a hell that during evolution some species - including man - crawled, fled onto some small continents of solid land, where the Lessons of Darkness continue.

</p>

Walker Art Center, Minneapolis, Minnesota April 30, 1999
Werner Herzog</p>

</p>

discuss...</p>

Faust
02-15-2007, 06:42 PM
I watched Kiki's Delivery Service. I didn't like the story at all, too fluffy. It's stands nowhere near Spirited Away in terms of plot, character, and animation IMO.

laika
02-15-2007, 06:49 PM
I finally saw Pan's Labyrinth. [W]</p>

I thought it was insanely good, and tremendously sad. I got depressed about the Spanish Revolution all over again, and am now reading Homage to Catalonia for the second time. </p>


</p>

Faust
02-15-2007, 09:01 PM
/\ I'm glad you went. It is an amazing film. I need to read Homage to Catalonia. I've never read Orwell's books (except 1984, of course), only essays.

laika
02-16-2007, 08:25 PM
You will love it. It's quite hilarious in parts, while also capturing the hopelessness/sadness of the war. I couldn't put it down.
</p>

I really liked how the movie fused fantasy with the real--i wasn't expecting the two dimension to coexist that way. Had anticipated something much more, ahem, allegorical. The violence was stunning.
</p>

Faust
02-17-2007, 11:00 PM
I rented The Departed on DVD. Big meh. The botched up ending spoiled the whole movie. If they give Scorcese an Oscar that (and they will have to one day, otherwise he'll never go away), I'll puke.</p>

Can't wait for Babel on DVD next week!</p>

sbw4224
02-17-2007, 11:53 PM
Interesting that you see The Departed that way, yet like Babel? I thought Babel was pretty mediocre and completely copied the story structure of Amores Perros. I don't think The Departed should win an oscar, but I thought it was pretty entertaining.

Faust
02-18-2007, 08:09 AM
Interesting that you see The Departed that way, yet like Babel? I thought Babel was pretty mediocre and completely copied the story structure of Amores Perros. I don't think The Departed should win an oscar, but I thought it was pretty entertaining.
</p>

I haven't seen Babel yet, I just said I look forward to seeing it :-)</p>

sbw4224
02-18-2007, 10:20 AM
Ah, my bad [:$]. I took your sentence to mean you wanted to purchase it.

designersheep
02-22-2007, 01:06 AM
Forget Babel, and forget The Departed.

Here is a quote from a post I've made on a film forum about two years ago. It is about elliptical filmmaking, and how some great directors use ellipsis in their directing style. I'm doing this just to get all of your interest level up on the directors I like, instead of your typical Hollywood fest like Babel lol,



Also, I agree how Bresson ended up shaping his own 'artificial' style, but that is the end result. What I tried to say was more of his philosophy and his approach. He tried to reach the truth by stripping away artificiality, and it is up to us to judge whether the end result was with or without artificiality. One can say his films have unnatural acting, but my view is that no acting can truly be natural to everyone, and no storytelling can ever be the same as the truth, whatever that means.

Narrative films are essentially the reflections of the real life, and everything in films are abstractions of the reality. Even directors like Cassavetes who heavily relies on the natural 'feel', the films aren't the reality, they are abstractions of the reality; because one eventually has to decide what to show, how to show, in which angle to show, and all that stuff in a feature length. Bresson understands this, and chooses to go in an extreme direction of stripping away everything (in his own way - Eric Rohmer does it in another way, I think), and creates his films. What he shows us, if we look at them cut by cut, are not realistic at all. Instead, his way of showing us series of images evokes the thoughts of reality within us; and essentially we are filling in the gaps our way, and each one of us fills the gaps (or analyzes the abstract images) in our own way, which would be the most intimate, real, and personal way to each of us. Well... I am going all gibberish now.




I think so. I don't know whether the term 'elliptical style' is solidified around film critics, but I think there is more to it than just what you and I have said above. Most notable examples of the directors with elliptical style would be Bresson, Ozu, and Antonioni; but they all have different approaches of ellipsis. I'll explain a bit about those 3 directors here, and these are mostly from my personal analysis, not something I read elsewhere, and I would love to hear different views on them.

Ozu is perhaps the easiest to explain. In his films he chooses not to show anything that would be the 'key acts' to the narrative. For example, if an arbitrary story involves a couple getting to know each other and then end up getting married, then what we would be shown by Ozu would be something like; everyday life of the couple -&gt; some narratively unimportant scenes of their encounters -&gt; gap -&gt; people talking about how those two are often seen together -&gt; gap -&gt; aftermath (drinking party?) of a marriage with a brief glimpse of the bride -&gt; etc. He does this because those 'special occasions' are not important. The important thing he wanted to show us are the everyday lives of people and how those occasions/acts end up changing their everyday lives. I think that is why he shows over and over seemingly mundane scenes (over and over across all of his films, not just within a single film). To simplify a bit here, Ozu uses ellipsis to discard what is unimportant.

Antonioni is the opposite of Ozu in terms of what he does not show. I've only seen 4 of Antonioni's films, but here's what I gathered. The common thing between Ozu and Antonioni's elliptical techniques would be that they both discards the 'key acts', but while Ozu does it to focus on what is important to him, Antonioni does it to obscure it. When Ozu skips a scene, we know what happened, but with Antonioni, we don't. The reason he does this (or why I think he does this) would be that his films IS about the mystery itself. He creates gaps that cannot be filled, and his film characters lives are heavily affected by those mysteries. I think this is a really wonderful and unique style that is distinctively Antonioni's, and he adds it in other dimensions too, such as acting (characters say a lot of things without meaning them) and camera angles. Antonioni uses ellipsis to hide what is important.

Now, Bresson has another approach. In addition to what you've quoted me above (lack of explanations and missing explanatory scenes/cuts/images), there's also the acting. Not only he is using ellipsis in terms of editing, he uses it on the acting methodology; stripping away all the emotions from his 'models' to create 'ellipsis of reason'. What I mean by this is that because his actors are so emotionless, we often don't know why they say/do certain things. Then comes in the filling the gaps part again. Therefore Bresson lets us be part of his film world by the use of ellipsis.

Ok, there. I have to confess that ALL of my posts in this forum are spontaneous, therefore I often make mistakes and say gibberish or say things I think otherwise. Anyhow, this is how I feel now, and it may change after watching another film or reading something about something

Thanks for reading.


I had to quote myself instead of writing one up, because I've decided to stop writing about films about a year ago; my words are just too snobbish and shoddy to truthfully describe the greatness of the films I love. I hate the way I write about films :P

P.S. I have watched neither Babel nor The Departed... and I have nothing against them. :)

Servo2000
02-22-2007, 01:49 AM
Interesting, designersheep! It reminds me of something I was discussing today with my pottery professor about painting. I can't remember much of what we were discussing, but the center was about how abstraction and certain styles within painting can actually create more realistic images, or images that are more realistic to the viewer. Comparing two of my recent paintings, one an interpretation of cubism the other a more realistic oil, in a very real way to me the cubist portrait appears more "realistic" (which I believe was, in fact, the intent of many of the original cubists) as it... imitates life better, perhaps, by avoiding the stoicism and single perspective of traditional portaiture. I'm still working on my ability to speak precisely about these sort of things, some points are eluding my ability to describe accurately. More reading to do, apparently. <DIV><BR class="khtml-block-placeholder"></DIV><DIV>The manner in which you describe these directors purposely disrupting or disturbing a typical narrative to create an experience that is perhaps more in line with our true experiences speaks of a similiar concept to me, and I find it fascinating. </DIV><DIV><BR class="khtml-block-placeholder"></DIV><DIV>Then again, I could be way off. </DIV>

designersheep
02-22-2007, 02:38 AM
Yes, exactly. Are you in an art school? Sounds really great that you get to discuss these matters with professors.

I've read on cubism before, but I've now totally forgotten what the cubists intentions were :P

I think the parallel can also be drawn with impressionistic paintings; just at different levels of abstraction. Ofcourse, the intent of the impressionists were to express the images the way they see/feel instead of how the world sees it. And interestingly enough there was a period in cinema history around 1930s with these impressionistic films and filmmakers who made films with exaggerated mis-en-scene, acting, and lighting; but from my pov, they were interpreting impressionism in how painters would think, not in the dimension of the film. The unique dimension that exist in film but not in painting, is 'time', and I think with the examples from my post above, the directors I've mentioned applies the technique not only on how things look like, but also on how things are structured in time.

And if you wanna discuss even more abstract examples, more parallels can be drawn between painters like Pollock who don't even paint 'real things' , and filmmakers like Stan Brakhage who paints directly on actual 'films' and run them through projectors to visualize abstract movements of colors and so on.

Since cinema is a relatively young art form (and often not even accepted as an art form due to overwhelming amount of entertainment purpose films), its history does tend to follow the footsteps of other forms of art, especially painting, photography, theatre, and literature. Despite that, there are many great film directors who made films that cannot be translated into other art forms, and they are probably the reason I am so in love with cinema.

designersheep
02-22-2007, 03:34 AM
On a similar note,

A French new-wave film director Jean-Luc Godard, has often applied techniques developed by theatre director Bertolt Brecht. Brecht was infamous for breaking all the rules of the theatre. His plays often had scenes where suddenly actors singing their lines inappropriately, talking to the audience, or other weird shit. The acting ranged from wooden to overacting, and lots of unrealistic acting principles were applied. In fact, he HATED Stanislavsky system which was widely accepted.

*Stanislavsky is the father of realism in stage acting, and 'method actors' such as James Dean, Marlon Brando, and Bob DeNiro uses his 'system'. The idea is based on actors conditioning themselves so that they actually feel what the characters are supposed to feel, so that the emotion comes internally. Instead of trying to express the feelings, the system encouraged the actors to hide the feelings, but in order to hide something, one has to have it inside :)

Brecht introduced all these 'distractions' in order to let the audiences know that they are only watching a play. He didn't want his audiences to be immersed in his plays. He added all sorts of crazy obstacles to prevent it! WHY? Because he wanted the audiences to think for themselves. Brecht's plays openly admitted to the audiences that what they are watching is only a play, but from there the audiences stop seeing the play and start seeing the ideas, the topics, and the message behind the play. He wanted us to see things for what they are, and decide what is right or wrong, or even if there is right or wrong. He didn't want to dictate us and force his views upon us (although this is inevitable to a certain degree, and he certainly did have plenty of messages to tell). He didn't want to do a play where we can enjoy the ride and come out with a grand conclusion that the good prevails, or life is difficult, or whatever most comedies, tragedies, and other genre plays aim to achieve. He wanted to make us come out of the theatre and to think about what they have seen for days or even weeks afterwards, and coming up with their own conclusions on various ideas discussed within.

Now it's really funny how I talk all this about Brecht, and I haven't attended a single play in my entire life. What I did were reading Brecht's essays, and watch about 25 films by Jean-Luc Godard, who has applied all these 'Brechtian' techniques to his films.

Godard is an inconsistent (in a good way) and totally unpredictable director, so it would be too much of a simplification to say Godard is the cinema equivalent of Brecht; but it wouldn't be so wrong to say Bertolt Brecht had the biggest influence on Godard's films, and most of these techniques are applied in one of his greatest films, Weekend. In that film, we see characters who talk directly to the camera, and a recently dead character suddenly starting to narrate the film (oops... this is Pierrot Le Fou but you get the idea), and an actor playing three different characters, and all sorts of crazy things. Rent and watch Weekend (I know Fuuma is a big fan too!).

nairb49
02-22-2007, 07:24 AM
I rented The Departed on DVD. Big meh. The botched up ending spoiled the whole movie. If they give Scorcese an Oscar that (and they will have to one day, otherwise he'll never go away), I'll puke.</p>

Can't wait for Babel on DVD next week!</p>

</p>

</p>

I wholeheartedly agree with that. So many people have been pushing for Scorses to get the award, "cause he deserves one" but definitely not for The Departed. Give him one of those "lifetime achievement" awards or whatnot. </p>

Faust
02-22-2007, 09:08 AM
I rented The Departed on DVD. Big meh. The botched up ending spoiled the whole movie. If they give Scorcese an Oscar that (and they will have to one day, otherwise he'll never go away), I'll puke.</p>

Can't wait for Babel on DVD next week!</p>

</p>

</p>

I wholeheartedly agree with that. So many people have been pushing for Scorses to get the award, "cause he deserves one" but definitely not for The Departed. Give him one of those "lifetime achievement" awards or whatnot. </p>

</p>

That's actually a good idea! I think he should've gotten one for Casino if anything.</p>

Faust
02-22-2007, 09:15 AM
Forget Babel, and forget The Departed.

Here is a quote from a post I've made on a film forum about two years ago. It is about elliptical filmmaking, and how some great directors use ellipsis in their directing style. I'm doing this just to get all of your interest level up on the directors I like, instead of your typical Hollywood fest like Babel lol,



Also, I agree how Bresson ended up shaping his own 'artificial' style, but that is the end result. What I tried to say was more of his philosophy and his approach. He tried to reach the truth by stripping away artificiality, and it is up to us to judge whether the end result was with or without artificiality. One can say his films have unnatural acting, but my view is that no acting can truly be natural to everyone, and no storytelling can ever be the same as the truth, whatever that means.

Narrative films are essentially the reflections of the real life, and everything in films are abstractions of the reality. Even directors like Cassavetes who heavily relies on the natural 'feel', the films aren't the reality, they are abstractions of the reality; because one eventually has to decide what to show, how to show, in which angle to show, and all that stuff in a feature length. Bresson understands this, and chooses to go in an extreme direction of stripping away everything (in his own way - Eric Rohmer does it in another way, I think), and creates his films. What he shows us, if we look at them cut by cut, are not realistic at all. Instead, his way of showing us series of images evokes the thoughts of reality within us; and essentially we are filling in the gaps our way, and each one of us fills the gaps (or analyzes the abstract images) in our own way, which would be the most intimate, real, and personal way to each of us. Well... I am going all gibberish now.




I think so. I don't know whether the term 'elliptical style' is solidified around film critics, but I think there is more to it than just what you and I have said above. Most notable examples of the directors with elliptical style would be Bresson, Ozu, and Antonioni; but they all have different approaches of ellipsis. I'll explain a bit about those 3 directors here, and these are mostly from my personal analysis, not something I read elsewhere, and I would love to hear different views on them.

Ozu is perhaps the easiest to explain. In his films he chooses not to show anything that would be the 'key acts' to the narrative. For example, if an arbitrary story involves a couple getting to know each other and then end up getting married, then what we would be shown by Ozu would be something like; everyday life of the couple -&gt; some narratively unimportant scenes of their encounters -&gt; gap -&gt; people talking about how those two are often seen together -&gt; gap -&gt; aftermath (drinking party?) of a marriage with a brief glimpse of the bride -&gt; etc. He does this because those 'special occasions' are not important. The important thing he wanted to show us are the everyday lives of people and how those occasions/acts end up changing their everyday lives. I think that is why he shows over and over seemingly mundane scenes (over and over across all of his films, not just within a single film). To simplify a bit here, Ozu uses ellipsis to discard what is unimportant.

Antonioni is the opposite of Ozu in terms of what he does not show. I've only seen 4 of Antonioni's films, but here's what I gathered. The common thing between Ozu and Antonioni's elliptical techniques would be that they both discards the 'key acts', but while Ozu does it to focus on what is important to him, Antonioni does it to obscure it. When Ozu skips a scene, we know what happened, but with Antonioni, we don't. The reason he does this (or why I think he does this) would be that his films IS about the mystery itself. He creates gaps that cannot be filled, and his film characters lives are heavily affected by those mysteries. I think this is a really wonderful and unique style that is distinctively Antonioni's, and he adds it in other dimensions too, such as acting (characters say a lot of things without meaning them) and camera angles. Antonioni uses ellipsis to hide what is important.

Now, Bresson has another approach. In addition to what you've quoted me above (lack of explanations and missing explanatory scenes/cuts/images), there's also the acting. Not only he is using ellipsis in terms of editing, he uses it on the acting methodology; stripping away all the emotions from his 'models' to create 'ellipsis of reason'. What I mean by this is that because his actors are so emotionless, we often don't know why they say/do certain things. Then comes in the filling the gaps part again. Therefore Bresson lets us be part of his film world by the use of ellipsis.

Ok, there. I have to confess that ALL of my posts in this forum are spontaneous, therefore I often make mistakes and say gibberish or say things I think otherwise. Anyhow, this is how I feel now, and it may change after watching another film or reading something about something

Thanks for reading.


I had to quote myself instead of writing one up, because I've decided to stop writing about films about a year ago; my words are just too snobbish and shoddy to truthfully describe the greatness of the films I love. I hate the way I write about films :P

P.S. I have watched neither Babel nor The Departed... and I have nothing against them. :)

</p>

I agree with your analysis (especially in the first part, the second part I can't judge because I haven't seen films by either), but I don't see how it should take away from a film like Babel :-) I do agree that Hollywood is absolutely incapable of showing grit, even their super serious films are always somehow dressed up. So, while I also think you can't show reality as it is, films very in their visceral impact - it is that impact, I think, that makes us think, "Wow, that was real."</p>

Servo2000
02-22-2007, 09:51 AM
Yes, exactly. Are you in an art school? Sounds really great that you get to discuss these matters with professors.

<DIV><BR class="khtml-block-placeholder"></DIV><DIV>High school, I'm afraid. Hopefully by the time I make it to college I'll be able to speak more clearly.</DIV>

Faust
02-22-2007, 09:56 AM
Yes, exactly. Are you in an art school? Sounds really great that you get to discuss these matters with professors.

<div><br class="khtml-block-placeholder"></div><div>High school, I'm afraid. Hopefully by the time I make it to college I'll be able to speak more clearly.</div>

</p>

Wow, had me fooled.</p>

designersheep
02-22-2007, 10:31 AM
Faust I didn't mean to take anything away from Babel, and I don't wanna judge a film I have not watched yet, but I will say this. The amount of attention that well made Hollywood films are getting compared to how little films of directors such as Tarkovsky, Ozu, and Bresson are getting despite all their critical acclaim, is truly staggering. It would be easiest to draw parallels to the fashion houses such as Gucci and Versace being top Hollywood directors, and Carpe Diem lines being Tarkovskies. Only difference would be that the film fans have the freedom to watch whatever they want by paying the same amount of money (rental or dvd purchase). As a viewer, when you know that there plenty of films to be watched by directors who think outside the box and takes the whole thing to another level, there's really no need to even look at all the craps being produced.

Servo wow I thought you were much older no offense :) I wish I am as articulate as you are now haha.

Faust
02-22-2007, 11:06 AM
Faust I didn't mean to take anything away from Babel, and I don't wanna judge a film I have not watched yet, but I will say this. The amount of attention that well made Hollywood films are getting compared to how little films of directors such as Tarkovsky, Ozu, and Bresson are getting despite all their critical acclaim, is truly staggering. It would be easiest to draw parallels to the fashion houses such as Gucci and Versace being top Hollywood directors, and Carpe Diem lines being Tarkovskies. Only difference would be that the film fans have the freedom to watch whatever they want by paying the same amount of money (rental or dvd purchase). As a viewer, when you know that there plenty of films to be watched by directors who think outside the box and takes the whole thing to another level, there's really no need to even look at all the craps being produced.

</p>

Actually, it's not about how much you pay, it's about how you gain access - so the analogy to fashion holds, if all you see in GQ is Gucci and Hugo Boss and not CDiem than you have a hard time finding the good stuff. What will propel you to find the good stuff is your dissatisfaction with what you see in GQ.</p>

Fuuma
02-22-2007, 11:23 AM
RE: the title of this thread </P>


Minnesota declaration: truth and fact in documentary cinema "LESSONS OF DARKNESS" </P>


1. By dint of declaration the so-called Cinema Verité is devoid of verité. It reaches a merely superficial truth, the truth of accountants. </P>


2. One well-known representative of Cinema Verité declared publicly that truth can be easily found by taking a camera and trying to be honest. He resembles the night watchman at the Supreme Court who resents the amount of written law and legal procedures. "For me," he says, "there should be only one single law: the bad guys should go to jail." Unfortunately, he is part right, for most of the many, much of the time. </P>


3. Cinema Verité confounds fact and truth, and thus plows only stones. And yet, facts sometimes have a strange and bizarre power that makes their inherent truth seem unbelievable. </P>



4. Fact creates norms, and truth illumination. </P>



5. There are deeper strata of truth in cinema, and there is such a thing as poetic, ecstatic truth. It is mysterious and elusive, and can be reached only through fabrication and imagination and stylization. </P>


6. Filmmakers of Cinema Verité resemble tourists who take pictures amid ancient ruins of facts. </P>


7. Tourism is sin, and travel on foot virtue.

8. Each year at springtime scores of people on snowmobiles crash through the melting ice on the lakes of Minnesota and drown. Pressure is mounting on the new governor to pass a protective law. He, the former wrestler and bodyguard, has the only sage answer to this: "You can´t legislate stupidity." </P>


9. The gauntlet is hereby thrown down. </P>


10. The moon is dull. Mother Nature doesn´t call, doesn´t speak to you, although a glacier eventually farts. And don´t you listen to the Song of Life. </P>


11. We ought to be grateful that the Universe out there knows no smile. </P>


12. Life in the oceans must be sheer hell. A vast, merciless hell of permanent and immediate danger. So much of a hell that during evolution some species - including man - crawled, fled onto some small continents of solid land, where the Lessons of Darkness continue. </P>


Walker Art Center, Minneapolis, Minnesota April 30, 1999 Werner Herzog</P>
<P mce_keep="true"></P>


discuss...</P>


</P>


<SPAN lang=EN-CA style="FONT-SIZE: 10pt; mso-ansi-language: EN-CA"><FONT face="Times New Roman">This is an interesting statement in the sense that it tells you a lot about its originator but not that much about what is being discussed (If I had a general rule to make I?d say those are always the most enlightening texts but that?s a very personal bias you don?t have to subscribe to). Werner Herzog?s cinema is one of transcendence, or at least of the yearning for transcendence, that scoffs at ?consensual truths? and rejects a humanocentrist worldview. For Herzog, Man is but an insignificant speck dwarfed by the incommensurability of an uncaring, nonsensical universe. Growing up eating wallpaper in <?xml:namespace prefix = st1 ns = "urn:schemas-microsoft-com:office:smarttags" /><st1:country-region w:st="on"><st1:place w:st="on">Germany</st1:place></st1:country-region>, during the aftermath of the Second World War, tends to do that to your mind but I digress. To make things short I?d say Herzog?s approach is instinctive, wide-reaching, spiritual and anti-documentarian/?facts are facts? to the extreme (even when making documentaries!!!). Truth is not to be found in the mundane but the sublime (yeah yeah I know I can never get my point across without using the shortcuts afforded by philosophical meta-language, sorry </FONT></SPAN><SPAN lang=EN-CA style="FONT-SIZE: 10pt; FONT-FAMILY: Wingdings; mso-ansi-language: EN-CA; mso-ascii-font-family: 'Times New Roman'; mso-hansi-font-family: 'Times New Roman'; mso-char-type: symbol; mso-symbol-font-family: Wingdings"><SPAN style="mso-char-type: symbol; mso-symbol-font-family: Wingdings">J</SPAN></SPAN><SPAN lang=EN-CA style="FONT-SIZE: 10pt; mso-ansi-language: EN-CA"><FONT face="Times New Roman">).<?xml:namespace prefix = o ns = "urn:schemas-microsoft-com:office:office" /><o:p></o:p></FONT></SPAN></P>


<SPAN lang=EN-CA style="FONT-SIZE: 10pt; mso-ansi-language: EN-CA"><FONT face="Times New Roman">The title of this thread is a direct quoting of something Godard had the main protagonist say in ?Le petit soldat?, an even cursory knowledge of Godard should tell you his characters often act as conduits for what he or other creators, via quoting, have to say about art, life, the place of the artist, creation, cinema, etc. so let?s assume, for the sake of (over)simplification that it originated from the man himself.<o:p></o:p></FONT></SPAN></P>


<SPAN lang=EN-CA style="FONT-SIZE: 10pt; mso-ansi-language: EN-CA"><FONT face="Times New Roman">Godards?s way of filming and having his subjects behave is definitely naturalistic at times, you often have scenes shot in exteriors (VS in a studio), with hand-held cameras, natural light and improvised dialogue. This is especially apparent when he presents the, somewhat pointless on a first degree analysis, banter that goes on between two lovers, where its easy to see fragments of your own life on screen, making you think ?We?re in a cinema, getting diverted watching people who are, in a way, playing us, without being us or anyone else, and we?re going to talk about us, watching us, playing us then talking about us, afterwards-an abyss within an abyss within an abyss, ad infinitum?. Godard, through realism, because he mixes it with theatricality, inter-titles, cinematic experimentation, famous and not so famous quotes and literary references of all kind, reminds you at all time that you?re watching a movie and what?s more a Godard movie. His work offers viewers the possibility of discussing what the frame is, what is inside/outside the frame, how they can blur and what it could mean as an artist, a viewer, a consumer, a person, etc.<o:p></o:p></FONT></SPAN></P>


<SPAN lang=EN-CA style="FONT-SIZE: 10pt; mso-ansi-language: EN-CA"><FONT face="Times New Roman">Yes, we could say that he?s incorporated parts of cinema vérité and his approach is definitely linked to philosophical materialism, an immanent view of man and his world, tinted by the often rocky relationship of the may 68ters with Marxism, Anarchism, Maoism, Situationism and various leftist ?isms? conductive to fancy-pansy discussions that really impress the art chicks at dinners. This doesn?t mean he isn?t, like Herzog, aiming at unearthing a truth that goes beyond mere facts, just that, as I just discussed, his cinema is based on different philosophical principles and life-experiences. If there?s an enemy those two directors have in common, it is definitely the accountants of cinema, purveyors of ready to wear truths and derivative dreck.<o:p></o:p></FONT></SPAN></P>


<SPAN lang=EN-CA style="FONT-SIZE: 10pt; mso-ansi-language: EN-CA"><FONT face="Times New Roman">On an even more personal level the thread?s title speaks to me because it evokes the naïve and absolutely charming view of Truffaut that you can learn everything there is to know about life using cinema, even going as far as asking if Cinema could be more important than life. There is something magical about this, a willingness to place yourself at a child?s level and see with the same eyes. <o:p></o:p></FONT></SPAN></P>
<P mce_keep="true"></P>

Fuuma
02-22-2007, 11:24 AM
Yes, exactly. Are you in an art school? Sounds really great that you get to discuss these matters with professors.

<DIV><BR class=khtml-block-placeholder></DIV>
<DIV>High school, I'm afraid. Hopefully by the time I make it to college I'll be able to speak more clearly.</DIV>


</P>


Wow, had me fooled.</P>


</P>


Yeah, Servo si a great contributor here and on superfuture.</P>

destroyed
02-22-2007, 01:36 PM
to tie things together, this all fits in with herzog's minnesota declaration that i posted a few pages back now. abstraction works on the same level as poetry-----it touches a subterranean truth, rather than the hollow exterior "facts" of which realists are so fond.</p>

PS i have "the conversation" waiting for me at home-----wooot!</p>

</p>

PPS yay for godard's weekend!
</p>

Seventh
02-22-2007, 10:10 PM
Thanks Destroyed for posting the Herzog declaration. I understood him to be critiquing a certain pretentiousness that has come to surround ?Cinema-Verite?, rather than going after the larger topic of realism.

The subsequent discussions have been really interesting as well, but it seems like everyone is intent on analyzing the cinematic structure of the films, and much less focused on issues of content or acting. If you look at the latter topics Ozu (who is fascinated with the relationship between generations and the effects of modernism) and Antonioni (who is interested in counterculture and fashionable subcultures) have very little in common.

I have a hard time with a lot of film theory (and art theory) that tries to limit the discussion of work to ideas about structure of things, whether it be abstract vs realist, minimalism vs romanticism, or medium specific (video vs film). It maintains a dialogue concerning culture that is fixated with appearances rather than content.

So having said that, I feel like I have to speak up though in defense of realism (whatever that exactly is). What first came to mind are the photos of the Bechers and Thomas Struth. Simple deadpan images of streets, portraits and industrial architecture. They are images that are completely concerned with documenting the details, the surfaces of things. What I love about them is their unpretentiousness, unlike for example, the films of Breckage, they are not trying to speak some abstract universal truth, rather they are concerned with just remembering all the details of a specific moment in time. But it is within the details, the realism of the images, that so much can be found, the pictures leave doors open for the viewer to make sense of. With Breckage I just feel pounded over the head?

For a similar reason, partly why I like Cassavetes so much is the openness of his films. He really allows actors to develop and lead the narrative in his films. The films are so realistic, documenting unexpected relationships, inadvertent words and actions that seem to only be loosely controlled by the director.

Anyway, I am running out of steam, but I just wanted to throw in my two cents about everything that has been said. Really interesting discussion all round. Like everyone else, I am surprised that you were in high school, Servo, your a great contributor.




</p>

designersheep
02-22-2007, 11:09 PM
^
Yes, yes I didn't mean to simplify everything that is in Ozu wity my statements. It was just an example from many characteristics of those directors, and just my amateur take on elliptical narratives. Anyway, my post wasn't in response to any other post over here; I just felt like throwing it up there. Also, when I try to write down what I think, I can't help but feel the reductionism kicking in; hence my time away from film forums :)

I think Abbas Kiarostami is a director who actually achieves what most of the directors associated with Cinéma vérité wanted to achieve but couldn't. There is no universal ultimate truth, and all artists seek to capture their own versions of truth; so really, I guess it all comes down to how our philosophies, as audiences, matches with the directors. Everything is subjective, and I feel that if a director is sincere and dedicated enough to constantly seek their own truth with films, they deserve my respect. To me, Kiarostami is one of the most humble and sincere directors working today, and I often sense childlike purity, innocence, and sincerity watching his films.

Arrragrjhreah, I'm getting to carried away here. I'd like to discuss more, but I really gotta do some work now hehe :)

Seventh
02-22-2007, 11:46 PM
Hey designersheep,</p>

Thanks for responding and I am sorry if what I wrote came off as argumentative. I just wanted to continue the dialogue and throw out a different viewpoint--not get into a theoretical fist-fight. I thought your take on elliptical narratives was fascinating, something I hadn't really thought about. I also really like how in your last post you mention sincerity, it is an underrated quality and something that I deeply respect in all artforms. </p>

Please do continue posting about films when you feel urge! [:)]
</p>

destroyed
02-23-2007, 09:11 AM
seventh</p>

you are right, the minnesota declaration is about verite, for sure, i was just broadening the application a bit. herzog's thoughts on the matter comes right out of nietzsche's birth of tragedy------herzog commits to dionyssian rather than apollonian ways of knowing; the ecstatic over reason.</p>

nairb49
02-23-2007, 06:03 PM
er, to dumb it down a bit, I watched Stranger than Fiction the other night. Pleasantly surprised. Will Farrell isn't usually my cup of tea, nor anything Dustin Hoffman in the past few years, but this was a nice one. Nice, easy, watch.

destroyed
02-24-2007, 07:50 PM
ooooh. the conversation was good. a must see for anyone in san francisco. paranoiac atmosphere is delicious. wheeeee!
</p>

mass
02-24-2007, 08:16 PM
inarticulate, otherwise i would try and contribute to the above discussion(s).



not much time for movies when i'm working 80 hour weeks but i watched cyborg again recently. van damme in his prime... it was one of my favorites when i was younger and i always preferred it over both bloodsport and kickboxer. i still enjoy it. great layering in the costumes as well!

destroyed
02-24-2007, 10:04 PM
i feel like i must have seen that, but i think i may have missed it somehow. i noticed on imdb that the characters are named after guitars and amps!</p>

marshall strat</p>

gibson rickenbacker</p>

fender tremolo</p>

</p>

WTF?!!!</p>

</p>

i must rent this</p>

mass
02-26-2007, 04:31 PM
i don't know anything about guitars or amps... that's awesome though. i was just reading about the director (albert pyun), and on his wiki entry it says: "Having trained under the legendary Akira Kurosawa, he has been acknowledged for squeezing dramatic cinematography into otherwise low budget productions. Japanese superstar Toshiro MIfune and Kurosawa's cameraman Takao Saito were Pyun's mentors and its clear his eye was trained by his experience in Japan."



haha wow. i also read he was originally filming the sequel to masters of the universe along with the spiderman movie... something fell through with both of them and cyborg is made with all the sets/costumes/everything else that they had already prepared for he-man 2.



!!!

Faust
02-27-2007, 04:19 PM
I watched Babel last night. Incredibly powerful and done just right. It stops short of gratuitous display of human misery a la Requiem for a Dream (or even 21 Grams). It dips you into human misery, but it also lifts you out of it (but leaves an imprint that allows you to reflect), and as a viewer, I appreciate it. It definitely makes you appreciate life (again) and realize (again) that it's such a fragile thing, that it sometimes depends on people who are in control but irresponsible at the same time. It also had an existentialist angle showing that your actions carry weight and responsibility for your actions is your own. The cultural stereotypes (such as "the american tourist") were not overdone, which was also a +. A really solid film overall.

Faust
03-16-2007, 04:37 PM
Someone tried to pursuade me to go see 300. WTF?

Servo2000
03-16-2007, 07:41 PM
Just watched Brick yesterday. Movies about highschool seem to be better when you're in highschool, so I don't know that this would stand up to many of our film afficionados here, but I enjoyed it. Interesting characters, fairly intriguing imagery. I don't know, it worked for me.

Casius
03-16-2007, 08:01 PM
I watched Babel last night. Incredibly powerful and done just right. It stops short of gratuitous display of human misery a la Requiem for a Dream (or even 21 Grams). It dips you into human misery, but it also lifts you out of it (but leaves an imprint that allows you to reflect), and as a viewer, I appreciate it. It definitely makes you appreciate life (again) and realize (again) that it's such a fragile thing, that it sometimes depends on people who are in control but irresponsible at the same time. It also had an existentialist angle showing that your actions carry weight and responsibility for your actions is your own. The cultural stereotypes (such as "the american tourist") were not overdone, which was also a +. A really solid film overall.
<DIV><BR class="khtml-block-placeholder"></DIV><DIV>You know Faust I just watched Babel a few days ago and I really didn't enjoy it. Something about the story left me wanting to know more about some of the characters, specifically Pitt and Blanchett's characters and thier life. What I found interesting though is the fact I got much more from watching the def Japanese girl in terms of anguish, misery, and a sense of belonging. She didn't even speak a word, but for me the performance was astounding in the fact she conveyed so much emotion. Also, something about the connection between all the stories just didn't seem at all plausible to me as it seemed almost 'too easy'. </DIV><DIV>I will say most of the actors gave amazing performances but the story just felt lacking to me. I much preferred "Crash" when comparing the genre of film.</DIV><DIV><BR class="khtml-block-placeholder"></DIV><DIV><BR class="khtml-block-placeholder"></DIV>

Faust
03-16-2007, 11:06 PM
/\ Yep, you are not the first. I think the NYT critic who reviewed it, was also dissatisfied with the plot. I agree that the connections made are pretty facile (especially Japan - Middle East connection). I didn't mind though, I was more taken with the emotion, just like you were. That actress deserved an Oscar for sure.</p>

I liked Crash, too. If you like that genre, I recommend 13 Conversations About One Thing. It was an indie movie, easily forgotten by the media, but it resonated with me.
</p>

PrinceOfCats
03-19-2007, 06:48 AM
'Climates' by Nuri Bilge Ceylan is probably the worst film I've seen in a long time. If I didn't know better, I'd say the director had just graduated from film school - it's seems to be made by someone who knows a lot about what's cool in arthouse film, but is so heavy-handed in implementing it that it's painful... I think the Voice just rated it because they were like 'Ooo, non-professional actors, it's like De Sica'.

Fuuma
03-19-2007, 06:57 PM
'Climates' by Nuri Bilge Ceylan is probably the worst film I've seen in a long time. If I didn't know better, I'd say the director had just graduated from film school - it's seems to be made by someone who knows a lot about what's cool in arthouse film, but is so heavy-handed in implementing it that it's painful... I think the Voice just rated it because they were like 'Ooo, non-professional actors, it's like De Sica'.
</P>


Oh really, damn, I thought Uzak (distant) was pretty good, did you see that one?</P>

Casius
03-19-2007, 07:01 PM
I liked Crash, too. If you like that genre, I recommend 13 Conversations About One Thing. It was an indie movie, easily forgotten by the media, but it resonated with me.
</P><DIV><BR class="khtml-block-placeholder"></DIV><DIV>Cool, I'll have to check that out as I've never heard of it. </DIV>

Faust
03-27-2007, 01:54 PM
Little Miss Sunshine. It was very funny at times, but the overall darkenss of the film overshadowed the funny parts a bit too much at times, so I felt guilty laughing in a few places... I hope that makes sense. The final scene is priceless though, I almost fell off my couch.</p>

Also watched Amadeus - not impressed at all. Not sure why it's praised so much.</p>

Incroyable
03-31-2007, 05:21 AM
Fuuma's top 100 movies: 10's</p><ul><li class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt;"><span lang="EN-CA"><font size="3"><font face="Times New Roman">Vampires, les/France/Feuillade/1916: Engrossing crime serial with a macabre edge, the main character is boring but you?ll be cheering for the amoral members of ?les vampires? gang</font></font></span>[/list]

</p>

An interesting vampire film is the Danish Vampyr which has the Baron Nicolas de Gunzburg in a role. The Baron was the world's first male fashion editor, at Vogue with Diana Vreeland and people like Carmel Snow--at Harper's Bazaar--as contemporaries.
</p>

</p>

Incroyable
03-31-2007, 05:29 AM
to tie things together, this all fits in with herzog's minnesota declaration that i posted a few pages back now. abstraction works on the same level as poetry-----it touches a subterranean truth, rather than the hollow exterior "facts" of which realists are so fond.</p>

PS i have "the conversation" waiting for me at home-----wooot!</p>

</p>

PPS yay for godard's weekend!
</p>

</p>

This was also the justification given by the '50s &amp; '60s American esthetes in defense of the Abstract Expressionists as it supposedly consecrated a mutual transcendence . Most vitriolic of the supporters was the lapsed Jew, Clement Greenberg.</p>

Kant also elaborated this concept in his "Critique of Pure Judgement", and to an extent, <font size="-1">Søren Kierkegaard in his "Either-Or" with his "aesthetic phase".</font>
<font size="-1"></font></p>

<font size="-1">Incidentally, Leo Strauss touched upon the esthetics of existentialism and its abstract convictions when he noted that the movement had a solid center but a fat exterior.
</font></p>

<font size="-1">However, to discount cinema verite--or its tenets of realism--too easily is an error, I feel, as it contains a particular grotesque beauty, not dissimilar to the photography of Diane Arbus. </font>
</p>

Goodness, I sound like one of those academics.</p>

Casius
04-06-2007, 12:49 PM
Just bought the movie "Blood Diamond" and I must say I really enjoyed it (watched it twice already this week).<DIV> Djimon Hounsou was incredible, some of the scenes with him and his son where really emotional to watch and he does such a great job conveying his anger on screen. I think he needs more leading roles in future movies, I've enjoyed watching him ever since Amistad.</DIV><DIV> Leonardo has surprised me with how good of an actor he has become over the last 7 years or more. Going from Titantic to something like Catch me if you can, I thought he grew up so much as an actor. Now with movies like the Departed and Blood Diamond, he has shown some incredible range and that he can provide some great accents. The South African accent he did in Blood Diamond was great and having met plenty of people from South Africa, I thought it was dead on. </DIV><DIV> The movie was pretty much non stop action with some pretty terrifying situations and conditions. It definitely keeps you on your heels and takes you for a journey of struggle, emotion, and greed. </DIV><DIV><BR class="khtml-block-placeholder"></DIV><DIV> All in all, I give it two thumbs up. :)</DIV>

Faust
04-06-2007, 03:25 PM
I think DiCaprio was always a good actor - if you look at films like What's Eating Gilbert Grap and Basketball Diaries - he's amazing. Titanic was his "I-will-now-become-a-household-name" film. But it looks like he's taking the Johnny Depp route with the huge blockbusters. It's all right, I guess - but that's not where an actor's strength lies. I'd like to see him in theater. I look at these guys who are a right mix of a good actor and a pretty face (DiCaprio, Johnny Depp, Brad Pitt), and I sometimes wish they were ugly and stuck to more challenging roles :-). They do a nice mix though - just when I'm ready to give up on Pitt he'll do a Snatch or Babel. Still waiting for Depp to do something worthwhile these days...

Faust
04-06-2007, 03:26 PM
On a more artsy-fartsy note - I have Zizek! in my house - can't wait to get to it tonight. I only missed him by a year or so - could've had him as a professor.

Servo2000
04-06-2007, 04:48 PM
I think DiCaprio was always a good actor - if you look at films like What's Eating Gilbert Grap and Basketball Diaries - he's amazing. Titanic was his "I-will-now-become-a-household-name" film. But it looks like he's taking the Johnny Depp route with the huge blockbusters. It's all right, I guess - but that's not where an actor's strength lies. I'd like to see him in theater. I look at these guys who are a right mix of a good actor and a pretty face (DiCaprio, Johnny Depp, Brad Pitt), and I sometimes wish they were ugly and stuck to more challenging roles :-). They do a nice mix though - just when I'm ready to give up on Pitt he'll do a Snatch or Babel. Still waiting for Depp to do something worthwhile these days...
</p>

I think Depp tried for on with The Libertine but personally I thought the movie was so terrible as to be almost unwatchable. I've heard others who absolutely adored it though, so it seems like a rather divisive film. He has The Rum Diary coming up probably in 2008 / 2008, that might be alright.

</p>

Faust
04-06-2007, 05:06 PM
I think Depp tried for on with The Libertine but personally I thought the movie was so terrible as to be almost unwatchable. I've heard others who absolutely adored it though, so it seems like a rather divisive film. He has The Rum Diary coming up probably in 2008 / 2008, that might be alright.
</p>

I haven't seen The Libertine. I am also convinced that they will never make the Rum Diary - I've been waiting for it for about 4 years already, ever since the news came out. I think it's the most underestimated of Thompson's works (it was only released because he became famous, but I thought it was a good novel on its own).
</p>

PrinceOfCats
04-07-2007, 12:55 PM
Depp's one of those 'can-act-won't-act' actors. He's been in so many films giving the camera the fifth look (the 'I'm just doing this for the money, I could do a serious film if I wanted to' look) that he may have to apply for British citizenship soon so he can join the rest of them.

Faust
04-07-2007, 03:19 PM
Depp's one of those 'can-act-won't-act' actors. He's been in so many films giving the camera the fifth look (the 'I'm just doing this for the money, I could do a serious film if I wanted to' look) that he may have to apply for British citizenship soon so he can join the rest of them.
</p>

Hahaha, I like the way you put it. The only difference is, I would like to say that he has become one of those actors after he re-emerged from a short break '03 - it's been much more easy-film heavy since.</p>

Casius
04-07-2007, 03:29 PM
Faust- I love the basketball diaries. Not really a fan of Gilbert Grape, maybe it's because I found the character to annoying or hard to watch. None the less he did a great job in both of those films though.<DIV><BR class="khtml-block-placeholder"></DIV><DIV>Just bought "The pursuit of happiness" staring Will Smith. Movie day today. </DIV>

Fuuma
04-11-2007, 02:43 PM
<p class="MsoNormal"><b style=""><span style="" lang="EN-US">Amants réguliers, les (Regular
lovers)/France/Philippe Garrel/2005: </span>[/b]<span style="" lang="EN-US">Semi-autobiographical story of lovers who meet
during the «social revolution» of May 68 and later hang around with
a bunch of disillusioned artistic youth in the luxurious apartment of a
bourgeois friend.<o:p></o:p></span></p>

<p class="MsoNormal"><span style="" lang="EN-US"><o:p></o:p></span></p>

<p class="MsoNormal"><b style=""><span style="" lang="EN-US">May 68:</span>[/b]<span style="" lang="EN-US"> pretty much the French pendant to the American
Vietnam protests, but with more intellectual posturing and less patchouli. A
lot of intellectuals of all stripes had their life shaped by what they lived
during May 68; in French political thinking there is a pre and post 68
division, which doesn?t happen often in history unless the son of god comes to
earth or something of that caliber. French new wave members were among those
that were greatly involved in all this, the work of Jean-Luc Godard being a
shining example.<o:p></o:p></span></p>

<p class="MsoNormal"><span style="" lang="EN-US"><o:p></o:p></span></p>

<p class="MsoNormal"><span style="" lang="EN-US">Why you
should see Les amants réguliers:<o:p></o:p></span></p>

<p class="MsoNormal"><span style="" lang="EN-US"><o:p></o:p></span></p>

<p class="MsoNormal" style="margin-left: 18pt; text-indent: -18pt;"><span style="font-family: Symbol;" lang="EN-US"><span style="">·<span style="font-family: 'Times New Roman'; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: normal; font-size: 7pt; line-height: normal; font-size-adjust: none; font-stretch: normal;">
</span></span></span><span style="" lang="EN-US">Gorgeous
black and white cinematography, the movie is striking, space and camera
positioning are sharply put to use, all this without looking overproduced or
too staged. In other words I don?t think a movie like 300 is visually
impressive but this one is?<o:p></o:p></span></p>

<p class="MsoNormal" style="margin-left: 18pt; text-indent: -18pt;"><span style="font-family: Symbol;" lang="EN-US"><span style="">·<span style="font-family: 'Times New Roman'; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: normal; font-size: 7pt; line-height: normal; font-size-adjust: none; font-stretch: normal;">
</span></span></span><span style="" lang="EN-US">Great
elliptical narrative that often skips the ?action? phase to go straight to what
is important; how the character react, what they feel, what it means to them.<o:p></o:p></span></p>

<p class="MsoNormal" style="margin-left: 18pt; text-indent: -18pt;"><span style="font-family: Symbol;" lang="EN-US"><span style="">·<span style="font-family: 'Times New Roman'; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: normal; font-size: 7pt; line-height: normal; font-size-adjust: none; font-stretch: normal;">
</span></span></span><span style="" lang="EN-US">Generates
various question about art, creation and the place of creators.<o:p></o:p></span></p>

<p class="MsoNormal" style="margin-left: 18pt; text-indent: -18pt;"><span style="font-family: Symbol;" lang="EN-US"><span style="">·<span style="font-family: 'Times New Roman'; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: normal; font-size: 7pt; line-height: normal; font-size-adjust: none; font-stretch: normal;">
</span></span></span><span style="" lang="EN-US">I
want to dress like the main character, who happens to be played by Louis Garrel
(the director?s son) which takes the autobiographical references to a whole
different level.<o:p></o:p></span></p>

<p class="MsoNormal" style="margin-left: 18pt; text-indent: -18pt;"><span style="font-family: Symbol;" lang="EN-US"><span style="">·<span style="font-family: 'Times New Roman'; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: normal; font-size: 7pt; line-height: normal; font-size-adjust: none; font-stretch: normal;">
</span></span></span><span style="" lang="EN-US">The
first act, which concerns the riots and their aftermath, is presented through a
series of long takes where uncertainty and a certain unreality makes the proceedings
all the more realistic by conveying how it felt, at least for one man, to be
there. A lesser director might have used frantic editing and a standard cinema
vérité, hand-held camera approach, creating a sort of newsreel but this is,
thankfully, not the case here. <o:p></o:p></span></p>

<p class="MsoNormal" style="margin-left: 18pt; text-indent: -18pt;"><span style="font-family: Symbol;" lang="EN-US"><span style="">·<span style="font-family: 'Times New Roman'; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: normal; font-size: 7pt; line-height: normal; font-size-adjust: none; font-stretch: normal;">
</span></span></span><span style="" lang="EN-US">Garrel,
a child of May 68 himself, manages to tell how the ?revolution? collapsed
afterward, without using dramatic gestures or overt symbolism; just by showing
you how the characters react and interact with each others and the world at
large.<o:p></o:p></span></p>

<p class="MsoNormal" style="margin-left: 18pt; text-indent: -18pt;"><span style="font-family: Symbol;" lang="EN-US"><span style="">·<span style="font-family: 'Times New Roman'; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: normal; font-size: 7pt; line-height: normal; font-size-adjust: none; font-stretch: normal;">
</span></span></span><span style="" lang="EN-US">The
male and female leads are excellent and bring a great sensitivity that is much
needed, as this is, at the foremost, a film that should speak to you on a
visceral level<o:p></o:p></span></p>

<p class="MsoNormal" style="margin-left: 18pt; text-indent: -18pt;"><span style="font-family: Symbol;" lang="EN-US"><span style="">·<span style="font-family: 'Times New Roman'; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: normal; font-size: 7pt; line-height: normal; font-size-adjust: none; font-stretch: normal;">
</span></span></span><span style="" lang="EN-US">Be
warned that it?s 3 hours and that I?m sure you could find people to say that ?nothing
happens?<o:p></o:p></span></p>

Fuuma
04-11-2007, 02:45 PM
Fuuma's top 100 movies: 10's</p><ul><li class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt;"><span lang="EN-CA"><font size="3"><font face="Times New Roman">Vampires, les/France/Feuillade/1916: Engrossing crime serial with a macabre edge, the main character is boring but you?ll be cheering for the amoral members of ?les vampires? gang</font></font></span>[/list]

</p>

An interesting vampire film is the Danish Vampyr which has the Baron Nicolas de Gunzburg in a role. The Baron was the world's first male fashion editor, at Vogue with Diana Vreeland and people like Carmel Snow--at Harper's Bazaar--as contemporaries.
</p>

</p>

</p>

Sounds interesting, is their a DVD/VHS release somewhere or should I wait for an occasion to see at a theater?</p>

Faust
04-11-2007, 03:22 PM
Thanks for the review, Fuuma. That era is certainly most interesting. I'll have to check it out.</p>

So, I watched Zizek! Meh, not really worth it. He did a couple of smart/funny lines, but that's about it. I guess film is not the right medium for this kind of stuff - readin his books would be a much more gratifying experience, I would think.
</p>

Faust
04-11-2007, 03:29 PM
The Wind That Shakes the Barley</p>

Clumsy title notwithstanding (it's taken from an Irish folk-song), a really excellent film about the Irish resistance to the British, gaining independence for Ireland, and the formation of IRA. </p>

A very heavy, gut-wrenching film, full of anguish, but more important (for a medium such as film) full of ambiguity and ambivalence, especially in the part where the Irish resistance split up into those who accepted the partial independence, and those who wanted full independence and formed the new IRA. It's also beautifully shot, really takes you there. The actors were great.
</p>

PrinceOfCats
04-11-2007, 05:07 PM
Loachy goodness as it may be... I'm not really sure that TWTSTB does anything that Land and Freedom didn't do twelve years ago.
</p>

I'm rewatching Beau Travail on slo-mo for my exam on Monday. Truly remarkable film... who knew that someone could go one better than Godard? (And that director being Claire Denis made it a real coup for women in the film industry.) I've heard that L'Intrus is even more challenging. </p>

</p>

Vicomte
04-11-2007, 06:30 PM
<P class=MsoNormal><SPAN lang=EN-US>Amants réguliers, les (Regular lovers)/France/Philippe Garrel/2005: </SPAN><SPAN lang=EN-US>Semi-autobiographical story of lovers who meet during the «social revolution» of May 68 and later hang around with a bunch of disillusioned artistic youth in the luxurious apartment of a bourgeois friend.<?xml:namespace prefix = o /><o:p></o:p></SPAN></P>
<P class=MsoNormal><SPAN lang=EN-US><o:p></o:p></SPAN></P>


</P>


Funny how Garrel almost always plays the same roles- I like him though.</P>


Your description may also suit The Dreamers (Bertolucci) -it wasn't exactly praised by the critics though but it's definitely an "easier" film if you compare with les Amants Réguliers</P>

Faust
04-12-2007, 03:02 PM
Loachy goodness as it may be... I'm not really sure that TWTSTB does anything that Land and Freedom didn't do twelve years ago.
</p>

I'm rewatching Beau Travail on slo-mo for my exam on Monday. Truly remarkable film... who knew that someone could go one better than Godard? (And that director being Claire Denis made it a real coup for women in the film industry.) I've heard that L'Intrus is even more challenging. </p>

</p>

</p>

I'd have to check that out. Of course I take everything with a grain of salt form an English imperialist like you [:P] </p>

I watched Children of Men yesterday. It was all right. I liked the apocalyptic portrayal of the world, the showing of controlled paranoya, and while I was a little bit upset at the end, I realized that there could be no other end without turning this movie into a complete science fiction and taking away from the philosophical bit of it. I also liked the idea of the savior figure going through the entire film without firing a single gun shot (without even handling a gun, actually) - that was refreshing from the usuall Hollywood machismo.
</p>

kamsky
04-12-2007, 03:45 PM
The Wind That Shakes the Barley</P>


Clumsy title notwithstanding (it's taken from an Irish folk-song), a really excellent film about the Irish resistance to the British, gaining independence for Ireland, and the formation of IRA. </P>


A very heavy, gut-wrenching film, full of anguish, but more important (for a medium such as film) full of ambiguity and ambivalence, especially in the part where the Irish resistance split up into those who accepted the partial independence, and those who wanted full independence and formed the new IRA. It's also beautifully shot, really takes you there. The actors were great.
</P>


</P>


<U>THIS POST CONTAINS A SPOILER (OF SORTS)!!!</U></P>


I also came away with a generally positive opinion of this movie, but I do feel like there is one major flaw with it; namely, Teddy, the main character's brother, becomes increasingly unbelieavable. I fail to see how it couldbe possible for a person to undergo the kind of atrocities to which he is subjected by his oppressors, and then, as you mention, accept a compromise that falls far short of his original ideal. If anything, his experiences would further, and irreversibly,polarize and harden his position. This becomes even more glaring as the story winds down, as his decisions, and the course of action that they entail, seem absolutely implausible.</P>

nairb49
04-17-2007, 07:49 AM
Watched "Sleeping Dogs Lie" yesterday, written/directed by Bobcat Goldthwait

Haven't decided whether I love it or hate it yet, but I don't think there's a middle ground...</p>

</p>

You should see it just for the awkwardness. </p>

Servo2000
04-22-2007, 02:38 AM
Just finished The Proposition (http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0421238/). I loved it, Nick Cave did an amazing job with the soundtrack, as well (as well as with writing the film!).

interman
04-22-2007, 02:51 PM
Just finished watching Delicatessen, by the director of Amelie. Really strange movie (not surprising), but also interesting and funny.

Faust
04-22-2007, 04:07 PM
Just finished watching Delicatessen, by the director of Amelie. Really strange movie (not surprising), but also interesting and funny.
</p>

Classic [Y] Watch City of Lost Children - that's even weirder.</p>

I tried watching Volver yesterday, but I fell asleep.</p>

interman
04-24-2007, 06:04 AM
I actually really liked Volver, but I guess it was a bit long. Yesterday I watched The Science of Sleep, another semi-french movie that's if possible even weirder than Delicatessen.

mass
04-25-2007, 10:12 PM
<p class="MsoNormal"><b style=""><span style="" lang="EN-US">Amants réguliers, les (Regular
lovers)/France/Philippe Garrel/2005: </span>[/b]<span style="" lang="EN-US">Semi-autobiographical story of lovers who meet
during the «social revolution» of May 68 and later hang around with
a bunch of disillusioned artistic youth in the luxurious apartment of a
bourgeois friend.<o:p></o:p></span></p>

i enjoyed this as well. i also enjoyed the dig at bertolucci!



funny you want to dress like him. i want to dress like bruno forestier.

nairb49
04-30-2007, 09:00 PM
Er, slightly less "high brow", but went to watch Hot Fuzz last night. Pretty darn funny, if I may say so.

interman
05-07-2007, 10:56 AM
Speaking of high brow movies, you guys should check out this thread http://forums.somethingawful.com/showthread.php?s=&amp;threadid=2460723

Faust
05-07-2007, 11:46 AM
Watched The Good Shepherd yesterday. I liked it a lot - a very strong film about formation of CIA, well acted, a lot of ambiguity (one of my favorite aspects).

Casius
05-07-2007, 07:00 PM
Watched The Good Shepherd yesterday. I liked it a lot - a very strong film about formation of CIA, well acted, a lot of ambiguity (one of my favorite aspects).
<DIV><BR class="khtml-block-placeholder"></DIV><DIV>Yea, I watched it for the second time yesterday and I liked it even more than the first time watching. I thought Damon was perfect for his character.</DIV>

een
05-08-2007, 12:29 AM
really feeling this: la collectionneuse (1967) by eric rohmer.</p>

not necessarily his best, nor my favorite, but..........very contemporary in its feel. if you don't know rohmer, there are probably better places to start, but this was a very pleasant surprise.</p>

http://i141.photobucket.com/albums/r47/eenecho/hydee.jpg</p><h1>
</h1>

</p><h1>
</h1><h1>
</h1>

Fuuma
05-10-2007, 10:28 AM
<p class="MsoNormal"><b style=""><span style="" lang="EN-US">Manufactured landscapes/Baichwal/Canada/2006<o:p></o:p></span>[/b]</p>

<p class="MsoNormal"><span style="" lang="EN-US">Documentary
about TO photographer Edward Burtynsky who travels the world (the doc is mostly
set in </span><st1:country-region><st1:place><span style="" lang="EN-US">China</span></st1:place></st1:country-region><span style="" lang="EN-US">) photographing how large scale human activity
transforms the landscape. Burtynsky's settings are cyclopean industrial works
like dams and the biggest Chinese factories, where a disturbing beauty emerge,
unexpectedly making us reconsider and even re-contextualize what we were
looking at. Good stuff.<o:p></o:p></span></p>

<p class="MsoNormal"><span style="" lang="EN-US"><o:p></o:p></span></p>

<p class="MsoNormal"><span style="" lang="EN-US">It?s better
to see it with friends, that way you can discuss the impact of filming another
artist?s work. Does it add an additional layer of meaning? Who is the ?author??
Photography might be a representation of reality but it doesn?t tell you
exactly where to look/what to see (that?s why press photography always has a
legend that tells you what is relevant) while the camera might film a
particular point of the picture and will put it in context, through narration
and previous events.<o:p></o:p></span></p>