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Thread: Who Makes What for Whom

  1. #61
    kitsch killer Faust's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SECRETSIDE View Post
    did a little research and found out about orizzonti co. - apparently they produce and distribute demeulemeester + westwood (or at least their MIJ pieces). not sure who heads production that takes place elsewhere.. anyone have any additional info?
    Pretty sure Gibo produces Westwood. Got a link? The would certainly be news.
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  2. #62
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    Quote Originally Posted by reborn View Post
    I totally agree (my grandfather hates when I buy anything made in Japan). Don't want to subvert the thread, but "Made in Italy" is not as valuable anymore. Production in Japan & France are the new "Made in Italy" as is artisinal production in the UK.
    That depends on what it is. There are still pretty of examples of more traditional businesses that are not as fucking greedy as Prada that still make a heck of a product.
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  3. #63

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    1994

    Tokyo Branch opened.

    “Vivienne Westwood” brand business started.
    orizzonti

    it could just be her women's mainline that they're producing ("lady's" is the only gender highlighted under westwood).. not 100% sure though, the english section isn't too informative.

  4. #64
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    Quote Originally Posted by SECRETSIDE View Post
    orizzonti

    it could just be her women's mainline that they're producing ("lady's" is the only gender highlighted under westwood).. not 100% sure though, the english section isn't too informative.
    Oh, Japanese, that explains it all. Probably just licensed to produce their stuff in Japan. They are also probably the ones who run Ann's Tokyo store.
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  5. #65

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    Quote Originally Posted by Faust View Post
    Oh, Japanese, that explains it all. Probably just licensed to produce their stuff in Japan. They are also probably the ones who run Ann's Tokyo store.
    haha good guess, they are. and yeah, that would explain the select pieces with japanese garment composition/washing instruction tags.

  6. #66

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    Quote Originally Posted by Faust View Post
    That depends on what it is. There are still pretty of examples of more traditional businesses that are not as fucking greedy as Prada that still make a heck of a product.
    Oh, certainly. I just meant to say, Prada aside, that the dynamic is changing around the world and "made in Italy" only doesn't mean a whole lot. For many items, yes, Italy is still the standard/staple... but only that things are becoming more global and quality is increasing in a lot of areas due to market demands. I think, at the end of the day, this will be a good thing.

    Prada just outsources to get cheaper shit, as we both know... so NO, I definitely don't think they do it for any other reason.

  7. #67

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    Quote Originally Posted by rach2jlc View Post
    Prada just outsources to get cheaper shit, as we both know... so NO, I definitely don't think they do it for any other reason.
    I thought they outsourced to get access to the couture-level polyester and ancient artisanal tradition of Romania.. The prices went up so that must be it!

  8. #68

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    Quote Originally Posted by Babar View Post
    I thought they outsourced to get access to the couture-level polyester and ancient artisanal tradition of Romania.. The prices went up so that must be it!
    You are correct, sir! I stand corrected. And, of course, those $400 nylon windbreakers are made in China because of the ancient techniques from the Han Dynasty for making jackets!

    And, the Vietnamese have been making expert footwear since the middle ages!

    Anyway, sorry for derailing the thread... just having a spot of fun...

  9. #69

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    Quote Originally Posted by Faust View Post
    Pretty sure Gibo produces Westwood. Got a link? The would certainly be news.
    Westwood MAN is still made by Staff, non?

  10. #70
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    Quote Originally Posted by rach2jlc View Post
    Westwood MAN is still made by Staff, non?
    Hmm, not sure.
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  11. #71

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    Does anyone know who makes the non Church's branded Jil Sander shoes? Not the S Lattanzi ones. And does Church's still make shoes post Prada or are their shoes made elsewhere? I'm sure I've seen this somewhere and cannot find it. Thank you!

  12. #72

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    you would be surprised at how much is actually made in china, and tagged with made in italy/japan/france... there're a couple ways that this is done - 1/materials and hardware are imported from europe to china for 90% of the work of putting a garment together, then shipped back where the the final "made in italy/france/japan/whatnot" tag is sewn on... therefore, technically the brands can argue that the items are actually made there, and not in china; 2/100% is made in china, including the tags stating "made in italy/france/japan/etc"... these pieces usually would have a double tag saying 'made in china' that is very small and easily ripped off upon export.
    i can claim this as a fact due to long-term observation/survellience/comparison and on occasion purchasing of authentic (either off-season but sometimes same-season) items from various shops in china - including (may surprise quite a few people) such brands as dolce & gabbana, mihara yasuhiro, neil barret, dietbutcherslimskin, dsquared2, etc... besides of course the more mass luxury labels such as armani, prada, etc.

  13. #73

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    ^ Egypt, too. Correct me if I'm wrong, but a bunch of countries in Europe don't even require "made in" tags...

    Honestly, I wouldn't care whether stuff is made in China – while there is the "slave labour" and bad workmanship shit that everyone talks about, there are also incredibly efficient, well managed factories which churn out quality merchandise – if the companies passed the savings on to the consumers... But they usually don't.

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  15. #75

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    very true. I live in italy and it seems that every time I pick up the newspaper there is an article on how the financial police exposed a cheap chinese labor house somewhere here. Almost all of them claim the chinese workers were producing accessories for "high-end and prestigious luxury brands".

    Thankfully leather artisans are still abundant here and can be found without having to search too much. Plus, their prices are frequently much lower than the price the high-end shop (that makes their shit in chinese factories in italy) is trying to charge you.

  16. #76
    kitsch killer Faust's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by deleuze View Post
    Thank you. Awesome article.
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  17. #77

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    Quote Originally Posted by Faust View Post
    Thank you. Awesome article.
    Agreed; both awesome and sadly "par for the course."

    Since WAY back, you and I have disagreed about the possible merits of Prada, but the more abysmal shit I see in the stores from them and the more articles such as this I read really make me get disgusted.

    Take a brand like Lambertson Truex, for example, many of whose menswear bags are openly made in China in high-tech facilities (they are not a part of Samsonite Group). Some of the bags, though, are made in Italy and the price reflects this difference in manufacturing cost. The "savings" seems to be passed on to the customer. For example, a made in Italy bag from LT will run $1000 or so, but the regular men's ones, made in China, are about $375 retail, while of being completely comparable or equal quality.

    What sucks about Prada is that they make crappier bags, for cheaper costs, and STILL charge $1375 for that bag even though it cost them 1/10 what it did the season before. GROSS!

    I have no problem anymore with outsourcing if they use good materials and factories that produce good bags and then pass that savings on to the customer. LT changed my outlook on "made in China" in that I've been using some of their bags now for a few years and the styling is great, the quality is great, and the prices are very reasonable.

    What gets me is when they change facilities, drop the quality to absolute shit, and then mark the goods UP 10-15% and act like they're doing us a favor (remember Prada America's Cup sneakers? Used to be made in Italy and $295... saw some at saks a while back, made in Vietnam and $340.)

  18. #78
    Senior Member MikeN's Avatar
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    Topping this great and very informative thread. I don't have much to contribute in terms of who is making what, but I would love to hear more from our posters more knowledgable on the topic.

  19. #79
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    I think Galliano since moved to Itierre (or maybe that's for his diffusion line?).
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  20. #80
    Senior Member MikeN's Avatar
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    Pretty relevant, from the Times...

    http://www.nytimes.com/2009/07/30/fa...gewanted=print

    July 30, 2009
    Signing His Name With a Stitch
    By RUTH LA FERLA

    MARTIN GREENFIELD roamed the rough planked floor of his clothing plant in Brooklyn recently, enjoying the familiar whir of a dozen machines. He paused abruptly to inspect the details of a custom tailored coat spread across a table, fingering a buttonhole. The hand stitching “is a signature for us, one that reads like a thank-you note,” he said.

    Just the way he likes it. “I don’t even like to read a thank-you note unless it’s written out by hand,” he added.

    In a career spanning more than three decades, Mr. Greenfield (photo at top) has overseen the stitching and the placement of pockets and seams in tens of thousands of garments, making his name as a tailors’ tailor. His plant in Bushwick engineers and produces 40,000 suits a year for some of the nation’s leading clothiers and for an impressive roster of private clients.

    For years he labored behind the scenes to perfect the set of a sleeve or slant of a pocket for the likes of Bill Clinton, Paul Newman and Michael Bloomberg, whose photos line his office walls. Among his more clandestine assignments was to whip up a suit for Michael Jackson. Mr. Jackson, he recalled, never appeared for a fitting. “It was a kind of undercover operation,” he said. The suit, he added, fit perfectly.

    As early as the 1960s, the Czechoslovakian-born Mr. Greenfield was cultivating a reputation as “tailor to the designers,” as he likes to say. Isaac Mizrahi and Donna Karan are among those who sought out his expertise. Ms. Karan, who had approached him in the ’80s to help her with men’s suits, recalled at the time that Mr. Greenfield taught her “discipline — how a quarter-inch adjustment can alter everything about the way a suit fits and feels.”

    Today his cutters, sewers and patternmakers piece together blazers and tailored hoodies for adventurous labels like Band of Outsiders.

    Mr. Greenfield could probably have reeled off the names of famous clients all afternoon. But more pressing things distracted him. “Look at this,” he said, pausing to watch as a worker bent over a buttonhole. “Each stitch has its own knot,” he explained, with mounting satisfaction. “Her job is to pull each knot exactly as tight as the last.” He would have it no other way.

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