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Thread: Videogames

  1. #1

    Default Videogames

    Videogames these days are very much apart of culture and lifestyle. Are they approaching the level of relevance as literature, movies or fashion?

  2. #2

    Default Re: Videogames

    IMO no. At least not until women take up video gaming in almost equal numbers as men, it will always be considered a niche sub-culture.

  3. #3
    kitsch killer Faust's Avatar
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    Default Re: Videogames

    Videogames are trash, IMHO. They only add to ADD, which is already highly developed in us. Waste of time, money, and brain cells.
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  4. #4

    Default Re: Videogames



    [quote user="Faust"]Waste of time, money, and brain cells.
    [/quote]</p>


    agreed.
    </p>

  5. #5

    Default Re: Videogames

    You people sound like Victorian grandmothers. Jeez.

  6. #6

    Default Re: Videogames



    [quote user=&quot;djrajio&quot;]IMO no. At least not until women take up video gaming in almost equal numbers as men, it will always be considered a niche sub-culture.
    [/quote]</p>

    I would really get behind that comments if we were talking about roleplaying games but video games have gotten pretty mainstream and universally liked, no? Of course the obsessive gamers are still men and they&#39;re part of a subculture but casually playing videogames is quite common from what I can see.</p>

    IMHO videogames are, now, entertainment and not art so any comparison with painting or such is kinda pointless....That&#39;s kinda like asking if Golf is an art form....</p>

    </p>
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  7. #7

    Default Re: Videogames

    I&#39;m not really a fan of videogames, I played them when I was a kid but was never that into them, I find them boring for the most part. I don&#39;t think they are harmful to the extent the media would like to portray them, and I do think they are useful in some ways (creative thinking, problem solving, coordination). My boyfriend is really into them though. I must say it annoys me, but I try not to judge. I can&#39;t really say that my involvment in fashion is a more noble cause than his love of video games so I try not to look down upon it and just think we each have our hobbies.<div>It&#39;s interesting that a number of fashion mags have recently had articles on video game worlds and how they may impact culture/fashion. I don&#39;t think it goes that far, but the fashion mags are just bringing them up because we&#39;ve had a very romantic/gothic/medieval season so they&#39;re trying to make a connection (that i don&#39;t think is there) about the current fashion trends and the fantasy medieval look of video games.</div>

  8. #8

    Default Re: Videogames

    I think the context for videogames is obviously different for different people, so opinions are going to have a tendency to land all over the spectrum. Or run the gamut, depending on your word choice.<div><br class="khtml-block-placeholder" /></div><div>For me, as an aspiring fashion-designer-cum-techno-artist thingamajig (see wemakemoneynotart) I spend quite a bit of time working with computers and doing a fair bit of coding. As a consequence, most of my friends play videogames, and so I fall in line. It&#39;s a great deal of fun, at least in my opinion, to spend time with a large group of friends and just play. It&#39;s a fantastic relief from the everyday and stress, at the very least. Secondly, at this point in my life, the thing to do is to go out with people and get completely smashed, which is perhaps the most boring thing I can possibly imagine, and with a dissapearing music &quot;scene,&quot; it provides an alternative. Sure, they catch some flak and they&#39;re never going to be cool, but whatever. At least my &quot;nerdy&quot; friends don&#39;t give a shit about how I dress.</div><div><br class="khtml-block-placeholder" /></div><div>Maybe I got some of my point across, maybe not. We&#39;ll see.</div><div><br class="khtml-block-placeholder" /></div><div>edit: just to clarify, when I say &quot;don&#39;t give a shit how I dress,&quot; what I mean is they don&#39;t care that I choose not to wear New Era caps with baggy jeans and some absurd t-shirt, which is apparently &quot;the big thing&quot; in So Cal right now</div>

  9. #9

    Default Re: Videogames



    I would say the most gaming can become relevant to culture and lifestyle would be in a similar way that sports is relevant to culture and lifestyle. An example of this would be in Korea where professional Starcraft gamers are paid to play sponsored televised League matches against each other. And they do have fans! But there it still is a niche sub-culture.
    </p>

    </p>
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  10. #10

    Default Re: Videogames

    They&#39;ve reached some sort of newapex in terms of their relevance to society and culture, no doubt- a teen was just killed by cops who were investigating the robbery of three PS3 systems.

    As far as my personal feelings, I grew up with a healthy interest in videogames, although I was not a truly hardcore gamer. These days, I am content to fire up an emulator on my computer and play through old favorites and games I wish I&#39;d played growing up.

    Have videogames reached the level of literature, or film, or art? Not yet... but eventually.
    There was an interesting article recently about a couple of small game development firms who were testing out new and exciting forms of the videogame- one was a truly open ended game system that evolved organically in real-time, and the other a totally realistic novella-like interactive story- there were defined beginning and end points, but hundreds of them, and the game offered X hours of replayability before you&#39;d end up taking the same path through it.

  11. #11

    Default Re: Videogames

    It&#39;s a real shame that nowadays &quot;videogames&quot; immediately means ADD-inspired trigge-happy/quicktwitch-reflex games<div><br class="khtml-block-placeholder" /></div><div>Does anyone remember the days before first person shooters and online RPGs, when there were games that moved at a much slower paced, in many cases did not have &quot;action&quot; based gameplay and actually required a fair amount of clever thinking to play? I&#39;m not only talking about the Myst-style adventure games (although I am a big fan of them!), but also many of the old simulation games and to a certain extent some of the real-time strategy (i.e. war strategy - Starcraft etc.) games. Most had very simple basic concepts, but were very much of the &quot;easy to learn, difficult to master&quot; type. Also, back in those times the focus was not so strong on how many polygons made up an object but rather on well researched and interested character, gameplay and environment design</div><div><br class="khtml-block-placeholder" /></div><div>That said, in reply to the original post, I think that videogames missed their chance to become something more than brainless entertainment. A few years back people were talking about videogames becoming a new form of education, or a way of teaching people new skills and expand their lateral thinking while they still enjoy themselves. Nowadays all that they teach is how to be able to aim at a pixel and click your mouse really, really quick</div><div><br class="khtml-block-placeholder" /></div><div>On a side note, anyone who hasn&#39;t played it should check out Grim Fandango, which I&#39;d personally say is one of the best games ever. It drew heavily on film and culture to inform the setting and the characters, as well as being a very funny yet still sombre problem-solving game. It may not be for everyone, but it&#39;s a great example of what videogames could have been - it&#39;s quite depressing that these kinds of games are no longer made because while they sold well and made money, they didn&#39;t make anywhere near as much money as the games snapped up by the ADD generation</div>

  12. #12
    kitsch killer Faust's Avatar
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    Default Re: Videogames

    [quote user=&quot;Spike&quot;]It&#39;s a real shame that nowadays &quot;videogames&quot; immediately means ADD-inspired trigge-happy/quicktwitch-reflex games<div><br class="khtml-block-placeholder" /></div><div>Does anyone remember the days before first person shooters and online RPGs, when there were games that moved at a much slower paced, in many cases did not have &quot;action&quot; based gameplay and actually required a fair amount of clever thinking to play? I&#39;m not only talking about the Myst-style adventure games (although I am a big fan of them!), but also many of the old simulation games and to a certain extent some of the real-time strategy (i.e. war strategy - Starcraft etc.) games. Most had very simple basic concepts, but were very much of the &quot;easy to learn, difficult to master&quot; type. Also, back in those times the focus was not so strong on how many polygons made up an object but rather on well researched and interested character, gameplay and environment design</div><div><br class="khtml-block-placeholder" /></div><div>That said, in reply to the original post, I think that videogames missed their chance to become something more than brainless entertainment. A few years back people were talking about videogames becoming a new form of education, or a way of teaching people new skills and expand their lateral thinking while they still enjoy themselves. Nowadays all that they teach is how to be able to aim at a pixel and click your mouse really, really quick</div><div><br class="khtml-block-placeholder" /></div><div>On a side note, anyone who hasn&#39;t played it should check out Grim Fandango, which I&#39;d personally say is one of the best games ever. It drew heavily on film and culture to inform the setting and the characters, as well as being a very funny yet still sombre problem-solving game. It may not be for everyone, but it&#39;s a great example of what videogames could have been - it&#39;s quite depressing that these kinds of games are no longer made because while they sold well and made money, they didn&#39;t make anywhere near as much money as the games snapped up by the ADD generation</div>

    [/quote]</p>

    There still are. There is one bozo who is making money by preaching that watching TV and playing videogames is actually making you smarter. He even wrote a book on it, but I forget his and its name. &lt;Edit&gt; found it.
    </p>
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  13. #13

    Default Re: Videogames



    [quote user=&quot;Spike&quot;]On a side note, anyone who hasn&#39;t played it should check out Grim Fandango, which I&#39;d personally say is one of the best games ever. It drew heavily on film and culture to inform the setting and the characters, as well as being a very funny yet still sombre problem-solving game. It may not be for everyone, but it&#39;s a great example of what videogames could have been - it&#39;s quite depressing that these kinds of games are no longer made because while they sold well and made money, they didn&#39;t make anywhere near as much money as the games snapped up by the ADD generation[/quote]</p>

    Spike, on another note, Monkey Island 1-4 were very enjoyable as well. Challenging puzzles, humourous and engaging plot and dialogue, and memorable characters, certainly a pinnacle of the gaming genre.</p>

  14. #14

    Default Re: Videogames



    Grim Fandango may very well be my favorite video game of all time. </p>

    The Monkey Island series are grand as well, but not quite grim fandango grand.</p>

  15. #15

    Default Re: Videogames

    [quote user=&quot;Faust&quot;]

    There still are. There is one bozo who is making money by preaching that watching TV and playing videogames is actually making you smarter. He even wrote a book on it, but I forget his and its name. &lt;Edit&gt; found it.
    </p>[/quote]<div><br class="khtml-block-placeholder" /></div><div>Incredible that he&#39;s even trying to argue that. The games that the education concept were based on are so dead and buried in the ground (due to them probably not being financially viable) that he&#39;s completely deluded. He doesn&#39;t seem to understand the difference between passive/active interaction (i.e. passively watching TV VS actively reading) and the huge difference it makes to education</div>

  16. #16

    Default Re: Videogames

    [quote user=&quot;GuitarFlame&quot;]

    Spike, on another note, Monkey Island 1-4 were very enjoyable as well. Challenging puzzles, humourous and engaging plot and dialogue, and memorable characters, certainly a pinnacle of the gaming genre.</p>[/quote]<div><br class="khtml-block-placeholder" /></div><div>[quote user=&quot;Servo2000&quot;]</div>

    Grim Fandango may very well be my favorite video game of all time.</p>

    The Monkey Island series are grand as well, but not quite grim fandango grand.</p>[/quote]<div><br class="khtml-block-placeholder" /></div><div>Yep, the Monkey Island series was a classic... I was a total product of 90s puzzlegaming, hah. Played the whole Myst series, Journeyman, Obsidian, the newer Zorks... basically all the games that would captivate me with the storyline and complexity of the puzzles involved. What kills me is that with all the new graphics technology available, making it so easy for designers to make a good-looking world, why there&#39;s no-one willing to put the time in to think of new, demanding puzzles. I like being able to take my time to think - I consider that kind of gaming to be a mental workout. Occasionally I like my adrenaline fix from mindless videogames, but it&#39;s only ever that: mindless entertainment. Anyone saying it&#39;s anything else is deluding themselves</div><div>Anybody know of any new puzzlers that have come out lately? =)<div><br class="khtml-block-placeholder" /></div><div><br class="khtml-block-placeholder" /></div></div>

  17. #17

    Default Re: Videogames

    Strangely enough, you know the &quot;death&quot; screens in Journeyman? My father illustrated more-or-less the entire series of games death sequences, up until the last two, I think, when they switched to 3D endings.

  18. #18
    kitsch killer Faust's Avatar
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    Default Re: Videogames

    [quote user=&quot;Spike&quot;][quote user=&quot;Faust&quot;]

    There still are. There is one bozo who is making money by preaching that watching TV and playing videogames is actually making you smarter. He even wrote a book on it, but I forget his and its name. &lt;Edit&gt; found it.
    </p>[/quote]<div><br class="khtml-block-placeholder" /></div><div>Incredible that he&#39;s even trying to argue that. The games that the education concept were based on are so dead and buried in the ground (due to them probably not being financially viable) that he&#39;s completely deluded. He doesn&#39;t seem to understand the difference between passive/active interaction (i.e. passively watching TV VS actively reading) and the huge difference it makes to education</div>

    [/quote]</p>

    Yea, he just wants to make some dough. People prostitute themselves in far worse ways. It does seem worse when someone with an academic record doesn&#39;t care for making a fool out of himself.</p>
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  19. #19

    Default Re: Videogames

    Speaking of &quot;educational&quot; games, I have been absolutely addicted to Pop Cap Game&#39;s Bookworm Adventures just recently. Yep, it&#39;s a game about spelling, and I am not shitting you when I say that when I was sick this week I did very little else.<div><br class="khtml-block-placeholder" /></div><div>I think it has something to do with my obsession with reading and everything that it entails, but whatever. I know there&#39;s some word smiths out there who would get hooked on this as well.</div><div><br class="khtml-block-placeholder" /></div><div>http://www.popcap.com/launchpage.php?theGame=bwa</div><div><br class="khtml-block-placeholder" /></div><div>I know it&#39;s absurd, don&#39;t judge me too harshly.</div>

  20. #20

    Default Re: Videogames



    It's a bit sad that some of you dismiss gaming as garbage. I've spent a few years writing articles about it, the culture, and the people.</p>

    Only twitch games? Incorrect. Look at the Nintendo DS and the Nintendo Wii. Gaming is a whole lot more approachable today than it's ever been.
    </p>

    If you can find it in stores, take a look at the British magazine Edge, which is easily one of the better when it comes to intelligent insight and coverage.
    </p>

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