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Thread: Leather care

  1. #1

    Default Leather care

    I have a specific question, but since there are so many people here interested in leather products, thought we could use this as a general thread for tips and care of leather goods.
    So my new Chelsea boots (see recent purchases) are made of a VERY soft leather. It came with somewhat of a patina on it and I love the color and finish, but the leather is so soft if I run my fingernail across it, it leaves a little mark. I wore them all day today (they were very comfy!) and there are a few little scratches on the toes but nothing you can see without close inspection.
    My question is: is this just the nature of the beast? should I let it go and write off the impending scratches and scuffs as added character? or should I treat it with something before wearing them again?
    I did spray them with a general protectant, mostly to protect against water and salt stains. But I'm wondering if I'm supposed to add polish or something to protect from scratches.

  2. #2

    Default Re: Leather care



    To care for such delicate leather, I suggest using minute applications of Lexol leather conditioner. Next, apply some tan shoe cream, Meltonian, Saphir or Kiwi works well.



    The leather will look "nourished" and I'm sure it will prevent any cracking and resist sratches




  3. #3

    Default Re: Leather care

    Thanks for the suggestions, I'll check those out. The leather feels soft and supple but it just seems naked so I'll feel better if I put something on it. I've heard that most scratches can be buffed out, is this true?

  4. #4

    Default Re: Leather care



    firemen use obenaufs LP for their boots



    fanatical collectors of vintage leather bomber jackets swear by pecards



    i use the former as i've heard that it is less greasy than the latter



    you can order direct from both companies



    a little bit goes a long way..

    broken mirror, white terror

  5. #5

    Default Re: Leather care

    no one has both yet eh? i might try out pecards...

  6. #6

    Default Re: Leather care



    What I do forshoes:



    1)clean them after each use, this is especially important in winter with all that salt



    2)Never wear the same shoes two days In a row, let them breathe and recover from all that humidity



    3)Put shoe trees after each use to absorb moisture and help retain shape



    4)Use some mink oil to make them water-resistant (to some degree)



    5)Polish your shoes regularly with an appropriate shoe cream/polish.



    A few questions:



    -I never use conditionner, I know what it's supposed to dobut doesanybody has comments on what it really does and were I could get some for a good price?



    -What about some pre-distressed/weirdly shaped boots, shoe trees couldmess them up so what do you do?



    -I don't do anything for leather jackets and belts, what do you suggest?





    Selling CCP, Harnden, Raf, Rick etc.
    http://www.stylezeitgeist.com/forums...me-other-stuff

  7. #7

    Default Re: Leather care

    I ruined a pair of shoes with mink oil - it made them so soft and flexible as to not hold their shape! I much prefer a more protective wax-based treatment, especially if you're in a bad weather environment.

  8. #8

    Default Re: Leather care



    mink oil supposedly DOES degrade leather and should be avoided





    pecards and obenaufs is sourced from beeswax, IIRC

    broken mirror, white terror

  9. #9

    Default

    sorry i had to dig this up.

    all these wax treatments make sense. but what I have here is somethign different.

    my reverse calf carpe diems are getting insanely beat up, dusty and dirty. I used to just give it a brush and occasionally then mink oil it. it would work fairly well, but recently the dusting has gotten too severe. It has a weird grey colour to it now. how should i make it black again, without redyeing?

    i was told that although the reverse calf looked like suede, it actually isnt. any recommendations on cleaning these babies would be much appreciated.

  10. #10

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by swych View Post
    i was told that although the reverse calf looked like suede, it actually isnt.
    Suede is alternately described as Reverse Calf. I believe you've been misinformed.

  11. #11

    Default

    hey fuuma,

    when you say clean regularly, what do you mean? just brush them down or wipe with a dry cloth?

    i live in chicago so lots of snow and salt, but i want to wear my ccp derbies.

  12. #12

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Fuuma View Post
    -What about some pre-distressed/weirdly shaped boots, shoe trees couldmess them up so what do you do?

    For my distressed boots/shoes I use travel trees similar to this. They have less spring and structure than regular shoe trees and don't seem to alter the silhouette of the footwear.


  13. #13

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by theetruscan View Post
    Suede is alternately described as Reverse Calf. I believe you've been misinformed.
    shit i feel like an idiot. thx anyhow

    i've been looking for a nice cedar shoe tree for more narrow feet/ shoes actually. anyone got recommendations for shoe accessories online? brushes, oils, shoe trees, shoe HORNS (i really need a nice one for a present right now).

  14. #14

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by AKA*NYC View Post
    For my distressed boots/shoes I use travel trees similar to this. They have less spring and structure than regular shoe trees and don't seem to alter the silhouette of the footwear.

    those are dope where you kop
    One wonders where it will end, when everything has become gay.

  15. #15

    Default

    Mine are from Church's. But you can get something similar anywhere.

  16. #16

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by swych View Post
    shit i feel like an idiot. thx anyhow

    i've been looking for a nice cedar shoe tree for more narrow feet/ shoes actually. anyone got recommendations for shoe accessories online? brushes, oils, shoe trees, shoe HORNS (i really need a nice one for a present right now).
    The Epic Shoe Tree is my favorite shoe tree out there. Not too sure about the rest. Shoe horns will likely come from old-fashioned men's brands, assuming you want actual horn.

  17. #17

    Default

    yeah i'm using the epic right now for my real shoes.

    but boots need something more specific. i guess i'll take a look at church's. its so hard finding these things when you dont live in a major city. walgreen's plastic just dont cut it

  18. #18
    kitsch killer Faust's Avatar
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    C21 has good cedar shoe trees - $12.99
    Fashion is a form of ugliness so intolerable that we have to alter it every six months - Oscar Wilde

    StyleZeitgeist Magazine

  19. #19

    Default

    Not to be a nerd about it, but as I understand it, the two terms can refer to slightly different things.

    Reverse Calf is the flesh side (inside) of leather (which has a natural nap)

    Suede is one of two things - 1.) the flesh side of leather, or 2.) the skin side of leather that is then buffed so it has a nap.

  20. #20
    Heirloom
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    Quote Originally Posted by Real Real View Post
    Not to be a nerd about it, but as I understand it, the two terms can refer to slightly different things.

    Reverse Calf is the flesh side (inside) of leather (which has a natural nap)

    Suede is one of two things - 1.) the flesh side of leather, or 2.) the skin side of leather that is then buffed so it has a nap.
    number one is often misnamed as suede when it actually isn't. Number sounds like nubbuck to me. Real suede is the flesh side with the outer skin side peeled off which is the part showing. it's split.

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