Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 784

Thread: Yohji Yamamoto

Hybrid View

Previous Post Previous Post   Next Post Next Post
  1. #1
    kitsch killer Faust's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Long hard road out of hell
    Posts
    37,680

    Default Yohji Yamamoto



    All right you all. Let's put NumberNine, Undercover, and all these other children's Japanese games aside - let's talk about the MASTER. Yohji never ceases to amaze me, over and over again. His clothes are like architecture, and I love how he marches to his own (black) beat. I think he's great. I would also like to recommend Wim Wender's documentary about Yohji, Notebooks on Cities and Clothes.



    Fashion is a form of ugliness so intolerable that we have to alter it every six months - Oscar Wilde

    StyleZeitgeist Magazine

  2. #2

    Default Re: Yohji Yamamoto

    I actually have Notebooks on Cities and Clothes in my Netflix queue right now -- I can't wait to see it. Yohji is one of the few designers who truly makes me see fashion as an art form by exemplifying it in his pieces.

  3. #3

    Default Re: Yohji Yamamoto

    Yohji is someone who has grown on me a lot in the past few months. I think once I can afford his pieces, a lot of his things might find their place in my wardrobe. I also own his documentary on DVD, and I also recommend it. His A Magazine edition is also my favorite. I'll post some of my favorite looks in a bit. Faust, where did you find your photos?

  4. #4

    Default Re: Yohji Yamamoto

    i really love yohji's womens clothes. i find his menswear is hard to figure out for me - the silhouette is something i figure out most of time - i appreciate bagginess but it doesn't look right the times i've tried much of his clothing. anyone have any insight on how to pull this off properly? i remember it being discussed briefly when the forum just started.. but the discussion didn't last too long.

  5. #5

    Default Re: Yohji Yamamoto

    I have the exact same feelings, great for women, hard to pull off for men. His v-necks andsomedress pantsseem perfect though...
    Selling CCP, Harnden, Raf, Rick etc.
    http://www.stylezeitgeist.com/forums...me-other-stuff

  6. #6
    kitsch killer Faust's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Long hard road out of hell
    Posts
    37,680

    Default Re: Yohji Yamamoto

    Yes, with Yohji you often either have to be fairly tall, or embrace the loose silhouette he promotes. He does - he wears his own cothes and somehow they look great on him. I have to say that his Y's line is much slimmer. I was eyeing a gorgeous knit coat from it, may still go for it. It's a nice mix between outerwear and a robe. I have two pieces from Yohji, both tops, and I love them. They are quirky and very high quality.
    Fashion is a form of ugliness so intolerable that we have to alter it every six months - Oscar Wilde

    StyleZeitgeist Magazine

  7. #7

    Default Re: Yohji Yamamoto



    [quote user="xcoldricex"]i really love yohji's womens clothes. i find his menswear is hard to figure out for me - the silhouette is something i figure out most of time - i appreciate bagginess but it doesn't look right the times i've tried much of his clothing. anyone have any insight on how to pull this off properly? i remember it being discussed briefly when the forum just started.. but the discussion didn't last too long.
    [/quote]




    in my opinion, it has more to do with your built. if you ownone of those dior model body type you will look out of place in yohji stuff. i have never had problem fitting into yohji items, i have a few tops and pants and they fit me pretty well. it might be because of my shoulder width and the result of working out which then sort of offsets the loose silhouette he creates.


  8. #8

    Default Re: Yohji Yamamoto



    not sure if this is all Yamamoto, but the gentleman has created quite a bit of debateon the Sartorialist blog.




    great look [Y]



  9. #9

    Default Re: Yohji Yamamoto



    another photo of Yohji



  10. #10

    Default Re: Yohji Yamamoto






    Movie Dolls (2002) by Takeshi Kitano. Costume design by Yohji Yamamoto


  11. #11

    Default Re: Yohji Yamamoto



    I have a love-hate relationship with Yohji. Conceptually, I love him. Practically, he makes me look like a homeless bum or someone who doesn't know what size he wears when I try to wear his garments.




    So, I'm with Faust and xcoldricex, I love the womenswear butcan only conceptually appreciatethe menswear. As others have mentioned, I am tall and skinny and usually look better in stuff from Helmut or Jil. So, the clothes really aren't made for me. If one is shorter or stockier (or shaped like Yohji himself), the look is great.




    But, God knows I've tried... having several friends who work for boutiques in Japan, I've had a veritable wardrobe of Yohji stuff from nearly all of his lines... from the mainlines to Y-3 to "Y's for Living," nearly all of which I later gave away to Japanese friends who made it look good.




    I couldn't make any of it work, except for a very few simple items. But, nevertheless, I think the stuff is so damn interesting I keep buying it. The piece I regret NOT buying most (perhaps of any in my life) was a black wool unstructured blazer with brownpaper stripes attached with fishing line, from which the paper was then partially removed (leaving the front of the jacket having strange stripes of ripped paper and fishing line). I could have had it for about $60 (6900 yen) and I passed. Stupid me... it was worth it for that just to keep in the closet as a collector's piece.




    But, the best part of Yohji is that he's been around for decades and has never changed, never scrimped or cut corners to make a quick buck, never kept expanding and expanding and signing licenses (or, when he does a license, it generally turns out to be more interesting than most other people's mainlines), and has never changed his silhouette despite the changes in the fashion winds. So, I'll keep paying attention... and so will you. ;)


  12. #12

    Default Re: Yohji Yamamoto



    Great thread guys, I would love the keep the discussion going.
    These are just some of my initial/random thoughts that I just wanted to get out there. I'll try and fix them up properly tomorrow.



    As with most of the others have said, conceptually, I love his clothing. However when it comes to wearing it I find myself a little torn.
    For me, personally, Yohji's clothes are more about how it makes you feel, rather than look. I find that his clothing gives the wearer a sense of air and ease about them self. But to wear them really well, I think first the wearer has to have that sense of comfort and ease already in themselves. Almost to the point where the wearer must cast away their unhealthy desires and be able to wholly embrace themselves. Which to me hints at an attitude linked to Buddhism and Zen.



    I find myself struggling between these two at times. I do have a cardigan, blazer and linen 'mc-hammer' pants which I adore and get much wear out of. However I have a boxy jacket which feels like heaven but I am just not comfortable enough wearing because I guess it makes me look ridiculously short and wide. But in ten, fifteen years perhaps? I think I will be able to break through those things that are stopping me from wearing it now...





    And by the way, Buckwheat, thank you for the picture.

    let us raise a toast to ancient cotton, rotten voile, gloomy silk, slick carf, decayed goat, inflamed ram, sooty nelton, stifling silk, lazy sheep, bone-dry broad & skinny baffalo.

  13. #13

    Default Re: Yohji Yamamoto



    Thanks for the gorgeous portrait, Buckwheat.



    Another one I like:





    [H]

    ...I mean the ephemeral, the fugitive, the contingent, the half of art whose other half is the eternal and the immutable.

  14. #14

    Default Re: Yohji Yamamoto

    [quote user="Avantster"]

    Great thread guys, I would love the keep the discussion going.
    These are just some of my initial/random thoughts that I just wanted to get out there. I'll try and fix them up properly tomorrow.



    As with most of the others have said, conceptually, I love his clothing. However when it comes to wearing it I find myself a little torn.
    For me, personally, Yohji's clothes are more about how it makes you feel, rather than look. I find that his clothing gives the wearer a sense of air and ease about them self. But to wear them really well, I think first the wearer has to have that sense of comfort and ease already in themselves. Almost to the point where the wearer must cast away their unhealthy desires and be able to wholly embrace themselves. Which to me hints at an attitude linked to Buddhism and Zen.



    I find myself struggling between these two at times. I do have a cardigan, blazer and linen 'mc-hammer' pants which I adore and get much wear out of. However I have a boxy jacket which feels like heaven but I am just not comfortable enough wearing because I guess it makes me look ridiculously short and wide. But in ten, fifteen years perhaps? I think I will be able to break through those things that are stopping me from wearing it now...





    And by the way, Buckwheat, thank you for the picture.



    [/quote]



    Very interesting.....thanks for sharing that. [51]



    I think there is a kind of double effect with the clothes--they do require a certain level of comfort and "letting go," as you're suggesting; but they also bring out a sensation of ease in the wearer. The serenity that Faust is describing....it seems to me that it has to do with letting go of "fashion" and self-image and experiencing the sensation of wearing, living, and moving in your clothes. It is no wonder that Yohji has collaborated so successfully with dancers, as opposed to Rei, who, (in at least one collaboration that I know of), is more interested in imposing constraint with her clothes. I was thinking about this while trying on clothes at CDG this weekend. There is something almost fascistic about the way that Comme deals (or doesn't deal) with the body, as if the garments were intended either to take the wearer out of their comfort zone, or to disregard the wearer altogether. To put it another way, CDG clothes are all about CDG clothes, whereas Yohji's garments are deeply concerned with, and committed to, the human form.



    I find both approaches conceptually fascinating, although I tend to feel a bit resentful/rebellious when I sense that something is being imposed on me. Both designers technically work well for my body, probably because of the Japanese sizing. But I feel less self-conscious and [paradoxically?] more myself when I wear Yohji.

    ...I mean the ephemeral, the fugitive, the contingent, the half of art whose other half is the eternal and the immutable.

  15. #15
    Senior Member comedyzen's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    San Francisco and Los Angeles
    Posts
    286

    Default

    Well..the ship hasn't sunk. Some investors came in and will carry him. And unfortunately, YY will only have a minority stake.

    I think this is a matter of too many stores during a a time when the economy heads south. Yohji just wants to design the goods.....it is hard for him to have oversight on his empires. He has God knows how many lines? He'll be fine. I just hope his style isn't affected by all this.

  16. #16
    kitsch killer Faust's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Long hard road out of hell
    Posts
    37,680

    Default

    /\ Well, judging by the radical departure of the last womens collection, maybe it has been affected.
    Fashion is a form of ugliness so intolerable that we have to alter it every six months - Oscar Wilde

    StyleZeitgeist Magazine

  17. #17

    Default Re: Looking Back...



    Wooden parts and hinges, materials normally far removed from clothing, were used in this piece. It seems as if it trying to escape from the human body, which will always remain the same. this outfit resembles the costume for the role of the manager in Parade, a ballet performed by the Ballets Russes in 1917. Pablo Picasso designed the costumes.



    Yohji Yamomoto 1991 A/W



    Set of wooden vest and skirt; black wool pieces, jointed with hinges.







    After his Paris debut with asymmetrical clothes using hanging fabric, Yamamoto returned to a more traditional Western dressmaking style in the mid-1980s. The felt dress has a close resemblance to a nostalgic form based on historical costumes. Through its exaggeration of the back and hips, this dress is trying to create a new recognition of the human body.



    Yohji Yamomoto 1996 A/W



    Black and white felt, black knit under skirt.










    let us raise a toast to ancient cotton, rotten voile, gloomy silk, slick carf, decayed goat, inflamed ram, sooty nelton, stifling silk, lazy sheep, bone-dry broad & skinny baffalo.

  18. #18

    Default Re: Looking Back...



    Runway shot from the Yohji Yamamoto 1996/97 A/AW collection (slightly different dress to above).



    let us raise a toast to ancient cotton, rotten voile, gloomy silk, slick carf, decayed goat, inflamed ram, sooty nelton, stifling silk, lazy sheep, bone-dry broad & skinny baffalo.

  19. #19

    Default

    i dont know i would have to disagree. I do think that Yohji has a clear vision and in some way it could be seen as a lack of creativity but i dont perceive it as such. I think that yohji is working with these same forms and silhouettes because he has found no way yet to perfect them, nor will he ever. As much as they may have been used throughout his body of work there is no such thing as perfection in fashion and i see Yohji as a designer less interested in making something "new" or "fresh" every season but rather as a person constantly trying to perfect the vision of what he wants his clothes to be.
    what is black?
    an absence, a presence, a mood, a mantle.
    -Martin Margiela

  20. #20
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    seagulls
    Posts
    991

    Default

    The last thing Yohji would ever be after is perfection.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •