Page 40 of 40 FirstFirst ... 3031323334353637383940
Results 781 to 796 of 796

Thread: Yohji Yamamoto

  1. #781
    kitsch killer Faust's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Long hard road out of hell
    Posts
    37,847

    Default

    He is a romantic womanizer, that's for sure. (and I am not saying that's a bad thing!)
    Fashion is a form of ugliness so intolerable that we have to alter it every six months - Oscar Wilde

    StyleZeitgeist Magazine

  2. #782

    Default

    His clothes are sensual and ritualistic simultaneously.

  3. #783

    Default



    For the first time in 5 years, Y's will show 2 runway shows at Omotesando, Tokyo. They will live stream their capsule collection collaboration Y's Alcantara FW19 on Saturday, May 25th at 7:00pm JST (6:00am EST)

    More on SZ-Mag

  4. #784

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Ahimsa View Post
    For the first time in 5 years, Y's will show 2 runway shows at Omotesando, Tokyo. They will live stream their capsule collection collaboration Y's Alcantara FW19 on Saturday, May 25th at 7:00pm JST (6:00am EST)

    More on SZ-Mag
    Pretty unremarkable, especially the silver reflective outerwear towards the end. The good clothes weren't much to write home about either, aside one or two of them. Not much else to say.

  5. #785

    Default Little help ?

    Have this Yohji with a really cool vintage pin up graphic. The tags faded, can’t make out much except for care/content, 90% rayon 10% silk.

    I was thinking it was from fall 1991 ? Anyone know for sure ?




  6. #786

    Default

    Does anyone have the tracklist for the latest mens show? Didn't want to bump a thread from 5 months ago so I'm asking here.

    Edit: found the first song in the tracklist which was the one I was looking for. It's a cover of Yosui Inoue's 傘がない (No Umbrella).
    Last edited by Monologue; 06-03-2020 at 04:51 AM.

  7. #787

    Default

    I have something special to share; a VOD of the 2016 Dressmaker documentary released on Vimeo, which I generally hear very little about and wasn't posted in this thread when it released. I don't know how it stacks up against Notebook on Cities and Clothes since I haven't watched it, but I am sure everyone who likes Yohji will also like this documentary. Here are some good quotes and low-res screenshots I took. DL link at the bottom.

    "Do you want to exchange your life for creation? If you don't create, then are you going to die? Then create... If you design clothing as a hobby, please stop it. You're just behaving like a 'fashion designer'; 'stylish', which I don't like too much... Get out of my sight."

    "I have to go out in the vanity fair, which I really don't like, but I have to pretend. These people like rumours very much. So people say Yohji is mysterious... Because I'm lying!"






    https://mega.nz/file/eYJFEI4S#h468oM...OSo9rfKPXQKAOY
    Last edited by Monologue; 06-03-2020 at 06:51 PM.

  8. #788

    Default

    Also, cool pictures from FW18. I got them from an all-black branded USB key they gave me when I went shopping at the Paris store back then. Seeing the collection from the back in pictures is a whole other universe, these photos made me truly understand why Yohji loves the back so much. Download link for all the files is at the bottom.





    https://mega.nz/file/LcYj2IjL#UOLT7e...WZgXVyxfTsj14E

    Enjoy.

  9. #789

    Default

    I admit his work used to be the emblem of the rebel, the dark goth label... I just have a hard time appreciating his look-this-is-the-most-cynical-rhetorical-possible-ever quotes. I'm not sure about teenagers in other parts of the world but kids here have invented a parody pattern of "Yohji fake quotes", eg, "Mao is the future of mankind --- Yohji Yamamoto" usually coupled by a picture of YY smoking...

  10. #790

    Default

    He is still much appreciated in Europe thanks to Grailed and archive stuff, though I don't see many teenagers go that deep into his aesthetic or get hardcore about him. And it goes without saying that when bought new he is way too expensive for all young people without daddy's credit card at hand. And I guess if he was more popular he would be in some shitty IG fashion memes too. Personally, I am enamoured with his output. He is still making fantastic clothing after all this time, so in some way he deserves to bitch and moan about what's around him. He hasn't given up yet, is the feeling I get from his recent collections.

    Quote Originally Posted by 13we2 View Post
    kids here have invented a parody pattern of "Yohji fake quotes", eg, "Mao is the future of mankind --- Yohji Yamamoto" usually coupled by a picture of YY smoking...
    Do you have some examples to share? Would love to see them, much better than what our comedic geniuses are coming up with.

  11. #791

    Default Really old piece

    Yohji Yamamoto, Japan's New Fashion Luminary, Has Serious Designs on the West

    By Harriet Shapiro

    It was only seconds before the climax of his first New York show last April. Backstage, at the cavernous West 14th Street Armory, a fuse blew and the lights went out. With eerie flashes from the strobes lighting up the runway, a slight figure darted forward into the thundering applause. Yohji Yamamoto, the 39-year-old Japanese designer, fresh from recent triumphs in Paris, had just brought Seventh Avenue cheering to its feet. The applause underscored not only Yamamoto’s success but also the explosive changes that are rocking the fashion world, turning Tokyo into the Milan of the East. Better known Japanese designers like Issey Miyake, Kenzo and Hanae Mori have been established in the West for much of the last decade. But now comes a new wave of Far Eastern avant-gardists—Yamamoto, Rei Kawakubo and Mitsuhiro Matsuda. “Yesterday it was the Italians. Today, the Japanese,” observed Hubert de Givenchy. “Who knows, tomorrow it might be the Chinese.” Chimes in Jon Weiser of New York’s trend-setting Charivari stores: “Of the new breed, Yohji is certainly the leader.”

    In Japan, fashion’s newest star is frequently stopped on the street and asked for his autograph. But such rock-star adulation has not softened Yohji’s stringent, Zen-like sense of design. Among his followers he has gained a reputation for radically conceived men’s and women’s clothes, cut away from the body. “I think to fit clothes tight on a woman’s body is for the amusement of man,” he announces. “It doesn’t look noble. Also it is not polite to other people to show off too much.” The Yamamoto view of fashion is diametrically opposed to the swishy grand luxe of French haute couture. “My clothes are very different from others,” he says. “Every time I do a show people say, ‘Yohji, why do you use such dark colors? Why do you make dresses in such a sad mood?’ ”

    To achieve the exquisitely simulated “poor look” his fans adore—and that sells for up to $1,200—Yohji hand-treats his fabrics at a factory in Gifu, a well-known textile center two and a half hours from Tokyo. There, using the friction of tiny pebbles, he stone-washes leather in huge steel tanks. Bolts of wool and cotton are dunked by workers in the Nagara River and sometimes dried along the banks. For Yohji, this process of breaking in fabrics is instinctive. “When I was a boy and my mother bought me a new shirt,” he recalls, “the first thing I wanted to do was wash it before wearing it.”

    Yamamoto grew up a lonely child in the Shinjuku district of Tokyo, a neighborhood dotted with cheap bars and cabarets. When he was 2, his father, Fumio, who had been in the restaurant business, died of undetermined causes on a transport ship en route to the Philippines. “My mother, Fumi, was a typical Japanese war widow,” says Yohji, pausing to sip his green tea. “She made up her mind never to marry again, to live alone and work very hard just for her child.”

    Yohji was 12 when Fumi, a dressmaker, transferred him from public school to the Ecole de L’Etoile du Matin (School of the Morning Star), an exclusive French Catholic school near the Imperial Palace. His future business partner, Goi Hayashi, was a classmate. Both men remember their first encounter in the schoolyard. Goi threw a rock at Yohji. “It was a place for rich people’s children,” says Yamamoto. “I felt I was different from the other boys.” About his childhood, Yohji says, “Even then the most important part of me was woman. I was born from woman and I lived for about 20 years with only woman. When I was at kindergarten, my most intimate friends were always girls. I always fought with boys. Girls were for me mikata—a friend, an ally.”

    In 1966, Yamamoto graduated from Keio University with a law degree. “My friends were secure about their future because of their connections,” he says, “but I had no connections. So I thought it over and over and I decided to change my future. I decided not to become a businessman.”

    With Fumi’s reluctant blessing he entered Bunka Fukuso, the famous fashion school where Kenzo had also studied. “I just wanted to help my mother,” he explains. “I didn’t know there was a kind of business called designer.” With prize money he won at graduation, Yamamoto went to Paris in 1968. It was a harsh time for Yohji, who rented a dark narrow room in a cheap Left Bank pension, making the rounds of fashion magazines and department stores—never with any luck.

    Back in Tokyo the following year, he free-lanced and helped Fumi in her boutique—designing for nightclub entertainers and housewives. But in 1972 he announced to his mother that he wanted to start his own ready-to-wear company. “Yes, you do it,” Fumi said. “It is up to you.” With her help (Fumi has been working for the firm ever since), he struck out on his own.

    Like his sojourn in Paris, those first years were intense, often bleak. But slowly Yamamoto’s luck changed, and in 1977 the press and public went wild over his breakthrough collection at the Bell Commons in Tokyo. Meeting with his staff after the show, the normally restrained Yohji burst into tears. “From then on,” he says with a twinkle, “it is a very common success story. So it is not as interesting.”

    Yohji’s modesty hides an intense professional drive. “I am hungry in my heart,” he has said by way of explaining his ambition. With his clothes now selling in 10 countries around the world, Yamamoto expects to gross $15 million by the end of the year. “I think he has a big future in the U.S.,” says Bloomingdale’s vice-president for fashion direction, Kal Ruttenstein. “It will take a bit of time. His clothes are not easily understandable to the masses. But in sophisticated cities and stores, customers will catch on that something different is going on.”

    Right now Yohji shares his modest one-bedroom apartment, a 10-minute bike ride from the office, with two cats and one dog. Divorced, Yamamoto has a 13-year-old son who lives with his ex-wife.

    In the midst of planning his Paris show for later this month, Yohji has his eye on the future. “After finishing all my fight, all my struggle,” he says, “I want to stroll along the street with my dog. I will love to be old man.”


  12. #792

    Default

    Some rare photos I found posted on twitter. A real trip down memory lane.


  13. #793

  14. #794
    kitsch killer Faust's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Long hard road out of hell
    Posts
    37,847

    Default

    Thank you - I love these! What a revolution it must've seemed at the time juxtaposed against Versace and Gaultier.
    Fashion is a form of ugliness so intolerable that we have to alter it every six months - Oscar Wilde

    StyleZeitgeist Magazine

  15. #795

    Default

    Yesterday while researching historical fashions from Spain, I found this picture of a 19th century spanish woman getting dressed by her maids while wearing an enormous miriñaque (hoopskirt) and I was shocked by the similarity of this picture with the bridal gown Yohji showed as the last look of F/W 98.99. Particularly interesting how he interpreted the dress being pulled above the woman's head as a hat.


  16. #796

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •