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Thread: Yohji Yamamoto

  1. #341
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    an article abt yamamoto in the telegraph

    http://fashion.telegraph.co.uk/news-...ting-edge.html

    'I have been collecting so many secondhand clothes for 30 years,' Yamamoto says. 'Army uniforms are made with special thread, for certain specific reasons - for the fight, or for protection. Ordinarily you cannot order those types of fabrics. There is no ornament; everything is necessary.' He refers to these clothes - a mad mix of the military and the folk, traditional clothing from around the world and through different periods of time - to recreate a particular fabric, or to be inspired by the cut of a jacket. There is an honesty about these clothes that he likes.
    Every garment will be shown to Yamamoto 10 or more times (it is usual for a designer to make changes to a toile three or four times), for fittings that last for days at a time, as he cuts into the fabric, drapes, pins and creates on the body; each piece of clothing is a process from the fabric itself to the pattern cutting to the fittings, the embroideries (it's not always all plain and black), and finally the finished product.

    Everything is made in Japan, and often pieces are finished by hand as part of a cottage industry keeping alive the arts and crafts of the country's traditional textiles business. It is about as far away from industrialised fast fashion as is possible to be. While the design and cutting is done in Tokyo, every one of Yamamoto's fabrics is made specially in Kyoto at the family-run Chiso factory, which was established in 1555, when it made garments for monks, and has been producing Japan's finest ceremonial kimonos for decades. A single kimono can take up to one year to produce, using up to 15 artisan processes along the way.

    It is an extraordinary relationship - a 21st-century operation that can connect Yamamoto with a dying breed of artisans capable of the finest craftsmanship. Here, in the suburbs of Kyoto, up impossibly narrow, steep staircases is a kimono painter, Mr Kimura, who sits down at his workshop table every day, using a rice paste to stop the colours seeping into each other, working 10-hour days to produce five or six kimonos a month. It was this ancient Yuzen technique that was used to create the extraordinary oversize kimonos Yamamoto designed for his friend Takeshi Kitano's poetic 2002 film, Dolls .

    Here, too, are the embroiderers, only three of them, in a sun-filled room, their sharp eyes focusing on millions of often microscopic stitches in the most exquisite shiny silk thread that appears to have been spun like candyfloss. A single kimono takes 12 days to embroider in this way. This workshop, at the top of another steep staircase, is run by Mr Murayama. He hand-dyes his own threads now because the supplies are no longer available in the subtle range of colours he requires. When Yamamoto needed special embroideries for costumes for Elton John's Red Piano tour in 2003, this is where they were done. The samples are still in the archive - silky spiders, and silver and gold safety pins so heavily worked that they look almost three-dimensional and real.

    For special projects, when money is no object, Yamamoto can indulge in using the craftsmanship he loves. But it is surprising when I am taken to visit a machine embroiderer in a block of flats on the outskirts of Kyoto, who is busy working on sections of jackets for the spring/summer 2011 Yohji Yamamoto menswear collection. Mrs Yamagata, who has been sewing like this for 40 years, is stitching bright motifs on 60 jackets, each badge taking 15 minutes, deftly moving the fabric freestyle, without a foot to keep it in place, around the needle of the sewing machine. These hand-finished jackets will go on sale this spring for 1,870. Mrs Yamagata reminds me of how Fumi Yamamoto would once have worked, sewing away at home to make a living for herself and her only son.

  2. #342

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    A single kimono can take up to one year to produce, using up to 15 artisan processes along the way.

    Even though one is aware of these time consuming processes,
    it always stuns me when I read it.

    Thank you for the article, nqth.

    Last edited by BECOMING-INTENSE; 02-08-2011 at 03:30 PM.
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  3. #343
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    Excellent and insightful article - thanks, nqth!
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  4. #344

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    Great article! Thank you so much for posting, nqth.

  5. #345

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    I've been thinking of preordering this, what do you think?
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  6. #346
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    You are most welcome :)

    I think this is one of the few articles recently that actually give some new information abt him.

  7. #347
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    Quote Originally Posted by michael_kard View Post
    I've been thinking of preordering this, what do you think?
    I should be getting a reviewer's copy - will let you know. You don't have to preorder it, unless you want to satisfy your consumerist urges - it's not like these books are limited edition.
    Fashion is a form of ugliness so intolerable that we have to alter it every six months - Oscar Wilde

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  8. #348

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    I was thinking of preordering because it looks quite informative (and I know nothing about Yohji), plus it could serve as a timely reminder to go to London. I'll be waiting to read your reaction though.
    ENDYMA / Archival fashion & Consignment
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  9. #349

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    Really wish I'd been exposed to Yohji sooner. Thanks for this thread!

  10. #350
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    Finally got the Yohji "bio" My Dear Bomb.
    What a suprise. For some reason I thought it was a coventional biography.
    Well it is nothing like that. In typical Yohji style it is more his musings on life, design etc.
    Kind of like a Zen biography.

  11. #351

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    It's so very beautiful, a cut onyx stone.

  12. #352
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    Quote Originally Posted by cremaster View Post
    Finally got the Yohji "bio" My Dear Bomb.
    What a suprise. For some reason I thought it was a coventional biography.
    Well it is nothing like that. In typical Yohji style it is more his musings on life, design etc.
    Kind of like a Zen biography.
    Available stateside as well.
    Fashion is a form of ugliness so intolerable that we have to alter it every six months - Oscar Wilde

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  13. #353

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    Not sure if anyone's posted this yet:

    http://s3.documentcloud.org/document...i-yamamoto.pdf

  14. #354

  15. #355

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    My "My dear bomb" is taking forever to arrive... it's been more than 3 weeks now since it was shipped, amazon is never that long usually.

    Dane : do you have the end of the interview ? There are only 3 pages and it ends with a question.


    Also, does anyone know which collection these garnments come from ? Thanks !

  16. #356

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    ^^ I do not, sorry. It's an excerpt form the V&A exhibition book.

    Read about it here: http://tmagazine.blogs.nytimes.com/2...4/bookshelf-2/

  17. #357

  18. #358

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    I have to say I enjoyed My Dear Bomb immensly, both of the main sections and that last short essay by Matsuoka. I liked Yohji's musings on small construction details, the way he thinks about tailoring, and stuff like fabric, buttons, shoulders, pockets, style. All in all, a good read.

  19. #359

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    Yohji Yamamoto: The Poet of Black Looks Back

    http://www.vam.ac.uk/channel/people/...poet_of_black/

    Rather nice 20min film
    "Lots of people who think they are into fashion are actually just into shopping"

  20. #360

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    syed, many thanks for posting that. it was a pleasure to watch the journey of Yohji. beautiful mind moved to create beautiful clothing.

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