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Thread: Yohji Yamamoto

  1. #381
    Senior Member MikeN's Avatar
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    Barbican, and MoMu, just off the top of my head

  2. #382

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    i saw one in the Musée de la Mode et du Textile at the Louvre a few years ago, and also some of his clothes were part of the current, or recently finished, exhibition there about fashion from 1990 to the present.
    despite the apparent inconsistency in what he says and what he has at least allowed, i agree with him, which is to say that he shoud have stuck to his guns. these things tend to leave me cold. it's like going to a vintage store (albeit a good one), but not being able to buy any of it. yohji's stores are like galleries anyway.

  3. #383
    kitsch killer Faust's Avatar
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    Fashion is a form of ugliness so intolerable that we have to alter it every six months - Oscar Wilde

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  4. #384

  5. #385

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    New film out on him - trailer here

    Yohji Yamamoto - This Is My Dream

    Doesn't look half as interesting as the Wim Wenders piece though.

  6. #386

  7. #387
    kitsch killer Faust's Avatar
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    Wow, the new investors are really making Yohji work the PR circuit. Poor guy.
    Fashion is a form of ugliness so intolerable that we have to alter it every six months - Oscar Wilde

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  8. #388

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    Quote Originally Posted by boxma View Post
    "Too fast..."
    www.matthewhk.net

    let me show you a few thangs

  9. #389
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fade to Black View Post
    "Too fast..."
    "...too furious."
    Fashion is a form of ugliness so intolerable that we have to alter it every six months - Oscar Wilde

    StyleZeitgeist Magazine

  10. #390

  11. #391

  12. #392
    kitsch killer Faust's Avatar
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    gorgeous grays
    Fashion is a form of ugliness so intolerable that we have to alter it every six months - Oscar Wilde

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  13. #393

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    I haven't made it to the exhibit yet but my mrs went and said that it was ok but too small and a little chaotic. What really got me though was that she said there was a no photos rule (as usual but still annoying) but also once inside they threatened to ask her to leave for sketching from the exhibit which I just find pretty shocking. She said everytime she was writing notes one or another member of staff would would radiate towards her or would pass by a little too closely behind her. Given that it's seems to include all of the pieces from the barbican exhibit I don't know if I should bother

  14. #394

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    Exhibition is good but agree with the lady, space is beautiful but too small for the number of pieces there. One feels bombarded with an overwhelming amount of visual data, which is a shame because the number of exhibits in terms of garments, videos and publications on display is tremendous, if you can deal with the claustrophobic environment. The amount of work that went into curating the exhibition is entirely evident, the garments just need a bit more space, a la the Yohji store in Antwerp. Exhibits are also scattered about the museum, the V&A collection and space sets up an interesting inter-relation between the garments and the existing displays.

    Spent only 45 mins there cruising, but will go back with my sketchbook and take more time. The hands-on attitude of the staff could be a bit of a downer if true, since the curator made a point that visitors should be able to freely interact with the exhibits.
    Last edited by tweeds; 04-04-2011 at 10:13 AM.

  15. #395

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    A/W 88-89 Photo I found while perusing old Metropolis mags

  16. #396

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    ^ I love the fact that what is now considered such an iconic image was actually a bit of a random shot after a whole day of shooting and not getting anything. (If I recall correctly Nick Knight talks about it well in this interview).
    "Lots of people who think they are into fashion are actually just into shopping"

  17. #397

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    Yohji Yamamoto designs for Heiner Muller's version of Tristan and Isolde:



    Really interesting to see his designs on a figure, and as costume rather than apparel. Check the related videos, too.

  18. #398

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    /\ Love this!

    The portion of My Dear Bomb dedicated to Muller is so inspiring. He really was amazing, and was pleasantly suprised when I found out about the collaboration.
    ENDYMA / Archival fashion & Consignment
    Helmut Lang 1986-2005 | Ann Demeulemeester | Raf Simons | Burberry Prorsum | and more...

  19. #399

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    read on wwd this morning. dont think it has been posted yet.


    Yohji Yamamoto
    Photo By Courtesy Photo


    Yohji Yamamoto
    Photo By: Courtesy Photo
    Launch Slideshow 4 images


    As a buildup to his 10-year anniversary with Adidas, Yohji Yamamoto has stripped down the way he works in a new documentary.

    Compelling as it is to see how closely the designer examines the drape of his designs and how he crouches on the floor to review rows of models’ head shots, the film’s most poignant moments happen when Yamamoto simply stands in front of the camera, speaking about his life and ideology. The opening scene makes clear that the movie will delve deeper than branding. “I’m an epicurean. I’m an anarchist. I hate power,” said Yamamoto.

    Produced by Harbor Film Co., “Yohji Yamamoto: This Is My Dream” tracks the designer from Tokyo to Manhattan in the monthlong lead-up to a Y-3 runway show during New York Fashion Week. Although the 30-minute documentary is a brand building tool, Yamamoto’s commitment to the design process is unquestionable, and he is surprisingly candid at times about all sorts of topics, especially about himself. The son of a war widow, who grew up in Tokyo after the bombs, Yamamoto lays bare his predilection for conflict, darkness — beyond his fondness for the color black — and how, at the age of five or six, he realized that life would be very hard. There is also mention of how school-age hopes of being a painter were shelved for law school to please his mother. She was later “so mad” when, nearing graduation, he asked her about working in her dress shop. But she told him to first learn how to cut clothes so that the other craftspeople would accept him, which of course he did with abandon.

    That setup might also explain his view of himself. “I’m a simple dressmaker. I’m not a fashion designer. I’m not following the trend. I’m not checking the merchandise. I’m not checking what is selling good,” he says in the film. “I’m not interested in fashion generally. I’m just interested in how to cut clothes.”

    Yamamoto owns up to being his own worst critic. “I have my own judge in me. He is always judging me,” and the verdict is, “You’re guilty.”

    The candor is heavy at times, but a more playful spirit surfaces when he is seen strumming a guitar and singing off-key about waking up in New York City. Athletic-minded as Adidas is, the company did not stop Yamamoto from being shown smoking throughout the film.

    Yamamoto seems to be more open to self reflection. His autobiography, “My Dear Bomb,” which is already out in Europe, will be distributed in the U.S. next month by D.A.P. His documentary is making the rounds at film festivals, and it will be shown at Adidas-organized screenings, including two in New York tonight at the TriBeCa Grand Hotel.

    Popular as the Y-3 collection is in the U.S., Europe and Asia, Adidas prefers to maintain it as a niche brand, positioned between high fashion and sportswear. Dirk Schoenberger, creative director of Adidas’ Sport Style division, said, “Even after 10 years of collaboration, Y-3 is still the only brand in that category, so we have to grow it wisely. Being too aggressive with retail development might be harmful to the image of the brand. We recently opened our first flagship in London and are looking into further locations in Europe as well as the U.S.”

    With plans to introduce Y-3 eyewear and hopefully fragrance down the road, Adidas has extended Yamamoto’s contract from 2013 to 2015.

    During an interview in New York earlier this month, Adidas senior vice president Rolf Reinschmidt reinforced how the company prizes its association with Yamamoto. Raising a hand high, he said, “Yohji is up here. We want to keep him there.”

  20. #400

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