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Thread: Forme D'expression

  1. #21

    Default Re: FORME 3'3204322896 F O R M D ' E X P R E S S I O N

    hmm...interesting what discussion a single blazer brings about....tat to me is fashion...hehe

  2. #22
    kitsch killer Faust's Avatar
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    Default Re: FORME 3'3204322896 F O R M D ' E X P R E S S I O N



    [quote user="laika"]Fascinating posts, Jarid and Faust. You've touched on so many things,
    and I am hoping that Fuuma will come in here and give us the semiotic
    analysis--my brain hurts just thinking about it. Am also missing
    Seventh here, who I'm sure would have some very eloquent insights. [51]

    I
    was reading a trend forecast for F/W 07-08 and it mentioned, among
    other things, that "raw" and "handmade" are on the rise. How this will
    be manifested--on the runways and in the streets--is, i suspect, very
    different from the aesthetic you are classifying as arte povera. All
    things discussed in the CCP thread aside, I think it takes a pretty
    rarefied and eccentric taste to appreciate the likes of Continues, Paul
    Harnden, Poell, etc. Their designs are too understated, and their
    appeal too subtle, to fit with the mainstream's use of fashion. These
    days it's all about standing out, expressing your individuality, blah
    blah blah. Whereas CDiem is very austere, severe, almost
    uniform-like. I definitely see them as being part of the current
    motion of fashion, but I don't see their aesthetic being directly
    appropriated and capitalized on--I just don't think many people would
    buy it.


    What I see happening now, is that fashion, having run out of ways to be new (the
    new being that which fashion depends on), is in a kind of liminal
    stage--it's coming of age. If it were a person in a traditional
    society, it would withdraw from the world, go into the woods, and maybe
    get some excruciatingly painful tattoos. Since it's not, we get to
    witness a whole mishmash of emotions, aesthetics, strategies,
    struggles, etc. Typical adolescent stuff.

    So, on the fringes of fashion we have the "raw" and the
    "handmade." It's not new, but it's very, very old--the pre-industrial,
    the bricoleur. (Bricolage being similar to what Jarid is observing in
    the dress of the homeless.) And on the runways we have nostalgic
    interpretations of the future, like Balenciaga quoting the Space
    Age--it's neither new nor old, simply outmoded. Or Dries (who is
    amazingly sensitive to the fashion weather), combing techno-fabrics
    with handmade embellishments. What I would like to see in both of
    these (wistfully) is
    a gesture towards a truly futuristic fashion. (This being what
    Chalayan has struggled with from the very beginning, in a context that's just never
    ready). I think (hope) a real futurism will be the next big move.



    Sorry for what I am sure is a most esoteric ramble. [:$] I don't have much to say about the rich/poor thing--I think it's rather moot, when we are discussing a $1000 jacket. But it's very fascinating in terms of what we hope to communicate and express with our clothes. I just want to
    add, that I think it's very limiting to see these designers in terms of
    arte povera alone. They share certain qualities with that movement,
    surely. But there are traditional Japanese aesthetics, for
    example--imperfection, perishability-- that can also (or instead) be
    discerned here.
    [/quote]



    Laika, I have a feeling (and you are confirming it with the trend forecast) that this niche market is getting big enough. And as we all know, it's a sad fact but people don't have to appreciate something in order to buy it - they can be influenced into buying it. I think such a market is certainly big enough in Japan alone, and maybe it is starting to get bigger in Europe/N.America. And these companies figure that maybe it's big enough to take a piece of the pie (like I said, a lot of money is a relative term). I look at A, and they are getting bigger and bigger, bringing in new (and EXPENSIVE) designers.



    And don't think they don't read forums like ours! I still remember how "Interior Design" magazine ripped off softgrey's tFS post about CDiem for their article.




    Fashion is a form of ugliness so intolerable that we have to alter it every six months - Oscar Wilde

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  3. #23

    Default Re: FORME 3'3204322896 F O R M D ' E X P R E S S I O N



    Hi




    Sorry to but in bit i was interested to read your views on Foorme and the overall Carpe Diem thing. For what it is worth i would like to write my opinion; as one of you have mentioned you are not sure how long this Forme or brands like it will last or even how they make money. I can tell you that brands like Forme are created by people that have a love and passion for what they are able to do, they would of course like to make money but yes it is hard...it is more a case of short term loss long term gain. I feel it is extremely hard to creat collections like a Forme without being a master of design; i too have seen it in The Library and it is incredible. I personally have 10 pieces from the line.




    Thanks for reading




    Ollie


  4. #24

    Default Re: FORME 3'3204322896 F O R M D ' E X P R E S S I O N



    Here's a link to a story about the designer and the brand...




    http://www.thememagazine.com/index.p...sk=view&id=102


  5. #25
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    Default Re: FORME 3'3204322896 F O R M D ' E X P R E S S I O N

    [quote user="ollie"]

    Hi




    Sorry to but in bit i was interested to read your views on Foorme and the overall Carpe Diem thing. For what it is worth i would like to write my opinion; as one of you have mentioned you are not sure how long this Forme or brands like it will last or even how they make money. I can tell you that brands like Forme are created by people that have a love and passion for what they are able to do, they would of course like to make money but yes it is hard...it is more a case of short term loss long term gain. I feel it is extremely hard to creat collections like a Forme without being a master of design; i too have seen it in The Library and it is incredible. I personally have 10 pieces from the line.




    Thanks for reading




    Ollie



    [/quote]



    You can butt in by all means. Actually, I want you to tell us more. There is nothing wrong with making money - one has to eat. We were merely questioning authenticity of purpose, and wondering whether the relative success of CDiem is being copied here. Are you familiar with the designer personally?

    Fashion is a form of ugliness so intolerable that we have to alter it every six months - Oscar Wilde

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  6. #26
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    Default Re: FORME 3'3204322896 F O R M D ' E X P R E S S I O N

    Jarid, thanks for the article.
    Fashion is a form of ugliness so intolerable that we have to alter it every six months - Oscar Wilde

    StyleZeitgeist Magazine

  7. #27

    Default Re: FORME 3'3204322896 F O R M D ' E X P R E S S I O N



    Reading
    this thread has generated a few jumbled ideas that I?ll deliver to you in their
    untangled form. Please note I don?t know the label (Forme) which means I have
    nothing to say about it as of now; these comments concern the state of the
    loosely linked arte poverta/ deconstructivist fashion movement we often discuss
    in here.





    Without
    getting into a detailed analysis of what these theories are about, we can say
    with certainty that one of the major findings related to the Theory of
    innovation is that being the ?originator?, the first person/group to generate
    an idea that will eventually be adopted in some form or another, is no
    guarantee of success and that?s an understatement! Taking something like the idea
    of a mass consumable moving land vehicle (a car) makes it quite easy to know
    why; the enormous amount of technological(roads, energy providers, mass
    production facilities etc) and social (new laws, change in perception, etc)
    changes create a nearly impregnable barrier to entry for the ?innovator?. We
    could say that, for an idea to be properly implemented it has to make its way,
    via some spectacular but promising failures noticed by the right people, into
    the mind of key players of the industrial, scientific, political and cultural
    world. In my mind this parallels the Everett Rogers model used in marketing (am
    I aiming at creating an unified theory of change or what!!), where ?innovators?
    (the really out there, cutting edge, creative people) start something, are
    spotted by early adopters (the cultural elite looking for new stuff) who will
    take the crazy innovator idea, work their magic to make the idea palatable to a
    large number and then unleash it unto the majority, who ends up crediting the
    early adopters with the idea. This is why your ultimate music geek friends are
    mad when you say Nirvana started grunge or something; you?re not giving credit
    where credit is due (which to the mind of the ultimate music geek is always to
    the innovator, no matter how outlandish and un-listenable the ?great? band
    was?). So if the arte poverta fashion movement really is on the cusp of hitting
    it big (relatively speaking), I guess we?re the ultimate music geek and we?re
    anticipating having to deal with all the idiots who can?t distinguish the New
    York Dolls from the Sex Pistols. It is natural to be somewhat anxious and talk
    about co-opting and blablabla but, considering the rawness that drew us to the
    original concept; it?s no wonder a new take on it has to emerge before it can
    gain wider popularity.





    The whole
    ?poor people? side discussion reminded me of something I once read, that made
    me sad and angry at the time: (I?m paraphrasing) ?after you?ve hit 25 y/o, the weight of social class
    comes back on you full force and it?s almost impossible to escape it,
    especially in your love life?. I do think its true, but it should only make you
    want to do everything in your power to avoid having your life dictated by such
    an unrelated outside force. On a more related note, the myth of the starving
    artist comes from a huge pileup of romantic ideals that reacted with one
    another; dissecting it completely would be a task akin to what an archeologist
    has to face when he works on the various ?levels? of an ancient site. I would
    say the idea that someone has live a little to create something that evokes
    something beyond mere plastic perfection is not that crazy, but restricting it
    to a simple economical calculus is reductive to say the least. The acuity of
    the gaze a creator poses on what surrounds him is of the utmost importance,
    what surrounds him being somewhat irrelevant. That being said, knowing an artist
    had a fascinating life, does add something to our appreciation of their work,
    but I?d be hard pressed to distinguish the part that comes from the artist from
    the baggage we brought due to knowing that information, art interpretation
    being as much about the viewer as the creator?



    Selling CCP, Harnden, Raf, Rick etc.
    http://www.stylezeitgeist.com/forums...me-other-stuff

  8. #28

    Default Re: FORME 3'3204322896 F O R M D ' E X P R E S S I O N

    i'm a bit intruiged by this brand, not exactly sure what to think of it. reminds me of a mixb/t Volga Volga, Attachment (at least the US-stores' buys), & Paul Harnden.the name is a bit gimmicky in my opinion, and some of the overly-distressed fabric treatmentsmaybe bit garish or trying too hard. i think a well-edited buy could fare pretty well, though i haven't seenit in stores.some piecesstill preserve anappealing edge to me, though i'm not sure ifthat iscommunicated through the clothing itselfor by its presentation from whati've seen so far. on the website, some pieces look promising,but at least thebuy from pollyanna seems a bit boring.of course the presentation has an influence on the brand's aesthetic, but i'mcurious how inspiringthe clothes are themselves. anyway, i just ordered this f/w blazer, hoping that i can comment a bit onits quality/cut/etc. when it arrives:



    here's some pics of the clothing (from factoryoffaith website):












  9. #29

    Default Re: FORME 3'3204322896 F O R M D ' E X P R E S S I O N











  10. #30

    Default Re: FORME 3'3204322896 F O R M D ' E X P R E S S I O N




    I havent seen a lot of stuff from them at stores, but they have some interesting looking pieces. some of theirFW06 look pics are really nice.did L'eclaireur have their stuff at some point?




    this jacket looks pretty cool:





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  11. #31
    kitsch killer Faust's Avatar
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    Default Re: FORME 3'3204322896 F O R M D ' E X P R E S S I O N

    Thanks, Kev. Some nice looking pieces, indeed. I don't think Pollyanna photographed them well.
    Fashion is a form of ugliness so intolerable that we have to alter it every six months - Oscar Wilde

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  12. #32

    Default Re: FORME 3'3204322896 F O R M D ' E X P R E S S I O N

    i just received my tweed blazer in the mail....upon first inspection it's pretty uninspiring. the feel of the fabric and the cut aredisappointing. perhaps it's too big, but the shouldersand chest fit, but it's boxy and roomy. i haven't even looked at it much becauseit's justblah, so i'll be returning it for sure. i'm got a good deal on it, but i can't imagine paying big money for this piece.hm ihope this was just a bad example; i thought some of the pieces looked nice. perhaps i'll findsome nicer pieces later on.

  13. #33

    Default Re: FORME 3'3204322896 F O R M D ' E X P R E S S I O N

    ^ What didn't you like about the fabric? I can only guess that from your description it sounds like it was a little too rough/raw than what you expected, perhaps more Paul Harnden-esque?
    let us raise a toast to ancient cotton, rotten voile, gloomy silk, slick carf, decayed goat, inflamed ram, sooty nelton, stifling silk, lazy sheep, bone-dry broad & skinny baffalo.

  14. #34

    Default Re: FORME 3'3204322896 F O R M D ' E X P R E S S I O N

    I come back to this article time and time again because I found it absolutely fascinating, especially the way it trails out which was perfect...pffffffff! Maybe that's Forme. Pffffff...

  15. #35

    Default Forme D'Expression - anyone know about them?



    They have some stuff on Polyanna and website with pictures of past seasons, but not much else.



    The items on Polyanna are vastly expensive - 1,850 for a jacket - but some of it I do like, especially the older stuff on their website.



    Anyone got anything of theirs? Or know any outlets apart from Polyanna?


  16. #36

    Default Re: Forme D'Expression - anyone know about them?

    Tried on few of thier pieces.They looked like poor clones of carpe aesthetics.

  17. #37

    Default Re: Forme D'Expression - anyone know about them?



    I had the same feeling as aruva, but last winter bought a long coat from them that is actually great, unlined textured wool with unfinished seams, i pay a ridicule fraction of the original price (the original pricing is actually ridiculous, to be true i doubt i'll buy something at real price). If someone is interested i can put some pictures. Agree also with the carpe comparisons, found it like a lame and more commercial aproach to the art povera fashion, i'm happy with my coat but that's it.



  18. #38

    Default Re: Forme D'Expression - anyone know about them?

    the website's pictures looked pretty promising. i had one grey wool coat from f/w06 by them, but it really didn't feel special at all - materials, fit, or looks wise in my opinion. it didn't really feel likepaul harnden or anything, and nothing really stuck out about it.maybethe piece i had wasn't the bestexample of their stuff,but i returned it pretty quickly. but, i'd reserve judgment until i got to examine more of it up close in store.

  19. #39
    kitsch killer Faust's Avatar
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    Default Re: Forme D'Expression - anyone know about them?

    merged
    Fashion is a form of ugliness so intolerable that we have to alter it every six months - Oscar Wilde

    StyleZeitgeist Magazine

  20. #40

    Default Re: Forme D'Expression - anyone know about them?



    I missed this thread the first time around.Great read and some insightful posting regarding the nature of innovation... I feel it really touches with what I've been fixated with lately, in trying to create an identity with my designs and how I feel about the trends in fashion right now... I don't think the purpose of Arte Povera(which I would sum up 'creating something new from something old' - in which case, once again we need to look back at Martin Margiela) should be cast aside, nor do I think technical innovation and 'modernity'(aka 'Futurism')should be sacrificed. The best designers seem to share an open mind about what's possible in design...





    ...I don't know if I'm getting accross... just getting comtemplative after a post-work smoke.

    Quote Originally Posted by merz View Post
    perhaps one day pipcleo will post a wywt so non-euclydian & eldrich in its shapes as to turn all onlookers into throngs of dishevelled, muttering idiots

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