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Thread: cool architecture and interiors

  1. #21

    Default Re: Enric Miralles

    [quote user="electric_alyce"]

    If THAT ain't sexy!!!</p>

    More piccies</p>[/quote]


    this is awesome.

    I love how the space manages to appear cold and warm and cozy at the same time.

  2. #22

    Default Re: Enric Miralles

    I get the feeling that stumbling home drunk in that place would be both a nightmare and health risk.
    Quote Originally Posted by merz View Post
    perhaps one day pipcleo will post a wywt so non-euclydian & eldrich in its shapes as to turn all onlookers into throngs of dishevelled, muttering idiots

  3. #23

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    "a+a" weekend house in Valle de bravo, Mexico by Diego Villasenor:







  4. #24
    kitsch killer Faust's Avatar
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    I'd live here.
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  5. #25

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    i'm so glad regionial modernism has finally evolved into something a bit more than accented boxes.

  6. #26

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    I'm fairly familiar with Barragan. I find that the original modernist aesthetics are very much concerned with masses and the larger moves. These photos make the house seem more designed at a personal level with more detailing. in fact i find most of the decisions in these photos falling almost into interior design territory.

    The evolution comment was linked to the photo with the stairwell and the courtyard. loving the connection between inside and outside at either end of the path upwards.

  7. #27

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    Loving the revitalization of this thread :)

    A couple of weeks ago I attended a talk given by David Adjaye when he visited San Antonio. Always interested to hear the background/inspiration/POV of the architect when you've only seen their work.

  8. #28

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    wire.artist i wasn't referring to large scale/ small scale buildings in modernism, but rather to the scale of the decisions. As you mentioned Corbu's villas, I'll use one as an example. Villa Savoye was very much concerned with the architectural promenadel, the flow of space from room to room. that is the scale i'm talking about- scuplting at the scale of the room. Even Mies' Barcelona Pavilion is the same- setting up these spaces that are then to be occupied.

    One of the lessons in modernism was the crafting of volume, and i do love the work of both masters i've mentioned above. For me, accenting these volumes is the next step. An example of this is Luis Barragan's use of colours to differentiate spaces. More contemporary examples would be Steven Holl or Zumthor who bring in materiality to further enhance a space.

    For me, the interest in the stairwell picture not only lies in the rupture at hte bottom and the top. those are the 'bigger' moves that i was talking about that was brought with modernism. its the accents created by teh trellis above that brings it the slits of light and shadow COMBINED with the blurry of exterior/ interior that makes me want to experience that space. Picture one shows the elevation of that stairwell. if you look at the 2nd floor, you'll notice the shadows of the trellis are more pronounced and in focus, resulting in a more intensely manipulated field of light.

    now look back at the 5th photo of the rupture and notice the floor there. this shadow and light here is more shaped by the larger frames of the window. if you shift back to the 1st photo, you'll find that if you were to ascend the stairs, the right hand wall is in fact a passageway, meaning that it is much darker.

    When I meant larger or smaller moves, it is this i was specifically referring to. The space above and the space below are joined separation. they flow completely unobstructed, maybe it was even meant to be a promenade in a Corbusian manner- this is the larger move. It is the different method that differentiates the space, notably the use of a trellis (which i find very regional, use generally around the tropical belt/ mediterranean?) and a courtyard to play with the connection/ separation of these spaces that interest me. I'd imagine the experience above and below to be very different, yet seemingly they are very transparent to each other.

  9. #29

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    Quote Originally Posted by Chinorlz View Post
    A couple of weeks ago I attended a talk given by David Adjaye when he visited San Antonio. Always interested to hear the background/inspiration/POV of the architect when you've only seen their work.
    How was the talk? I need to find a list of architects that talk well about their work. Most stars i've admired have fallen short at the lecture itself. it doesnt depeciate their work imho, but i want to be blown away! anyone been to inspiring lectures by architects?

  10. #30

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    I got a small question, I hope someone (Faust?) can help me with. I'm starting to grow an interest in architecture, not as a proffesion, and not on a high level, but does anyone have anywhere I can learn "the basics" of architecture? Online articles, books whatever

  11. #31

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    These are the text books used for my modern architecture history class:

    http://www.amazon.com/Modern-Archite...3675803&sr=1-1

    http://www.amazon.com/Programs-Manif...3675858&sr=1-1

    the conrad's is great. covers manifestoes from art nouveau-> futurism-> le corbusier etc.

  12. #32
    kitsch killer Faust's Avatar
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    Alyce, believe it or not, I am not very well versed in architecture. I only know some philosophical underpinnings along the lines of what's in the second book that swych has posted. That's a useful book, because the defining moment in modern architecture was surrounded by a lot of manifestos from the likes of messianic maniacs like Le Corbusier (who wrote more than he built, lol), and Adolf Loos (ditto). Once you read them, you will understand how a lot of modern architecture works, and the origins of the modern aesthetic. But I am sure someone like wire.artist can help you more.
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  13. #33

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    Quote Originally Posted by swych View Post
    wire.artist i wasn't referring to large scale/ small scale buildings in modernism, but rather to the scale of the decisions. As you mentioned Corbu's villas, I'll use one as an example. Villa Savoye was very much concerned with the architectural promenadel, the flow of space from room to room. that is the scale i'm talking about- scuplting at the scale of the room. Even Mies' Barcelona Pavilion is the same- setting up these spaces that are then to be occupied.

    One of the lessons in modernism was the crafting of volume, and i do love the work of both masters i've mentioned above. For me, accenting these volumes is the next step. An example of this is Luis Barragan's use of colours to differentiate spaces. More contemporary examples would be Steven Holl or Zumthor who bring in materiality to further enhance a space.

    For me, the interest in the stairwell picture not only lies in the rupture at hte bottom and the top. those are the 'bigger' moves that i was talking about that was brought with modernism. its the accents created by teh trellis above that brings it the slits of light and shadow COMBINED with the blurry of exterior/ interior that makes me want to experience that space. Picture one shows the elevation of that stairwell. if you look at the 2nd floor, you'll notice the shadows of the trellis are more pronounced and in focus, resulting in a more intensely manipulated field of light.

    now look back at the 5th photo of the rupture and notice the floor there. this shadow and light here is more shaped by the larger frames of the window. if you shift back to the 1st photo, you'll find that if you were to ascend the stairs, the right hand wall is in fact a passageway, meaning that it is much darker.

    When I meant larger or smaller moves, it is this i was specifically referring to. The space above and the space below are joined separation. they flow completely unobstructed, maybe it was even meant to be a promenade in a Corbusian manner- this is the larger move. It is the different method that differentiates the space, notably the use of a trellis (which i find very regional, use generally around the tropical belt/ mediterranean?) and a courtyard to play with the connection/ separation of these spaces that interest me. I'd imagine the experience above and below to be very different, yet seemingly they are very transparent to each other.
    Architecture is so nerdy but awesome.

  14. #34

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    Thanks swych, Faust and wire.artist! Will look into some of those books ^^

  15. #35
    kitsch killer Faust's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by wire.artist View Post
    LC built a lot actually, in india and southamerica.
    Thank god he didn't do much urbanism , his idea of destroying Le Marais in Paris was....
    Adolf Loos was an active architect too hehe

    I would recommend Delirious New York by Rem Koolhaas, Venturi's books and Aldo Rossi's books. Those are a fun read and extremely influential nowadays. Bruno Zevi is interesting too.
    There are some little books like Conversations with students by Louis Kahn that are a must.
    Tanizaki's little essay about shadow in architecture is another good one.

    Benevolo's history books are a good resume of all time architecture.

    Le Corbusier is quite annoying to read haha
    Fixed your typos in the first sentence Yea, when I show the proposed sketches for Le Marais in class, it brings the point home.

    He is quiet annoying to read - I have to keep reminding my students about the time and place and the war they had to wage. Adolf Loos sounds like an outright condescending asshole in Ornament and Crime :-)
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  16. #36

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    <3 loos; they don't write like that anymore. what was it again, "if a tattooed man dies before committing a crime, then he had merely died premature to the murder he was to commit?"

    corb gets repititve easily- thats why the ulrich conrads book is so awesome.

    i like the list of books u provided wire artist, but i definitely wouldn't want to be reading the whole thing for alot of them. excerpts are the way forward because they get so caught up things get waffly and reptitive. venturi is case in point.

  17. #37

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    bumping this..

    I need inspiration for building exteriors that mix old and new architecture, old buildings that have modern expansions.

    working on a project that involves renovating an old factory building into apartments, and we need to add a column of balconies. instead of trying to blend it in, I want to make it stand out nicely. The building is basically a concrete block with a off-white exterior, I'm thinking of utilizing metal and a dark grey or black colour for the balconies.









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  18. #38

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    awesome bump Lowrey -> really looking forward to more examples as working on a similar project.

  19. #39

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    Not sure where this home is, but I've always liked how warm and livable it looks. Also love how everything is so close to the ground...









    http://111wpm.tumblr.com/

  20. #40

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    John Lautner built some of the koolest private residences of the 20th century in los angeles...

    http://picasaweb.google.com/johnlautnerfoundation

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