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Thread: Your top10 (ouch)

  1. #101

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    Quote Originally Posted by galia View Post
    What would you consider to be Von Trier's magnum opus?
    Breaking the waves?

    Now my first post was firmly tongue and cheek and about posting "low" forms of cultural productions, my fav books aren't cartoons and noir novels...
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  2. #102

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    Breaking the Waves or Dogville I'd say, though I was always impressed with Dancer in the Dark. He's a hit or miss little nazi for me, though. That reminds me I should get around to Nymphomaniac.

  3. #103

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    I must have pedestrian taste, because I despised dancer in the dark for being too "mélo" and I hated dogville with a burning passion for being contrived. I haven't seen breaking the waves. My favourites from what I've seen are Europa and Melancholia (I actually cried for like 20mns after watching Melancholia ahah). I don't really want to see Antichrist or Nymphomaniac. Maybe I just don't like him, I don't know.

    But what I most enjoyed of LVT is his TV series, it's just really fun

  4. #104

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    What do you mean by mélo, Galia? I detest the man TBH, consummate filmmaker but not really for me.

  5. #105

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    I mean it's a tear-jerker

  6. #106

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    Quote Originally Posted by Fuuma View Post
    Breaking the waves?

    Now my first post was firmly tongue and cheek and about posting "low" forms of cultural productions, my fav books aren't cartoons and noir novels...
    Is this tongue in cheek as well? Just curious.
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  7. #107

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    Quote Originally Posted by Arkady View Post
    Inherent Vice doesn't do a lot for me either but it is very entertaining.
    Did anyone else spend all of Inherent Vice comparing it to The Big Lebowski? There were so many similarities to me (but, full disclosure, I know The Big Lebowski better than most).

  8. #108

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    My Top11

    1. L’Intrus – Claire Denis
    2. A Woman under the Influence – John Cassavetes
    3. The Shining – Stanley Kubrick
    4. Psycho – Alfred Hitchcock
    5. Caché – Michael Haneke
    6. In the Mood for Love – Wong Kar-Wai
    7. Hanabi – Takeshi Kitano
    8. Persona – Ingmar Bergman
    9. Chloe in the Afternoon – Eric Rohmer
    10. Inland Empire – David Lynch
    11. Collateral – Michael Mann
    Mezeinee

  9. #109

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    Quote Originally Posted by jurassicsnark View Post
    Did anyone else spend all of Inherent Vice comparing it to The Big Lebowski? There were so many similarities to me (but, full disclosure, I know The Big Lebowski better than most).
    Clearly you don't know it well enough--both films are intertextual adaptations.

  10. #110

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    Quote Originally Posted by malaesthetique View Post
    Clearly you don't know it well enough--both films are intertextual adaptations.
    Kinda, Lebowski is based on Chandler while Inherent Vice a direct adaptation of the Pynchon novel.

    Chandler's work and the Big Lebowski precede both the book and film versions of Inherent Vice, and they share a very similar style. Specifically a las Joel Cohen's statement: "We wanted to do a Chandler kind of story – how it moves episodically, and deals with the characters trying to unravel a mystery, as well as having a hopelessly complex plot that's ultimately unimportant".

    Jurassicsnark may be more perceptive about the stylistic DNA of PT Anderson's film than you're giving him credit for. You got to say intertextual though!

  11. #111

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    Quote Originally Posted by Arkady View Post
    Kinda, Lebowski is based on Chandler while Inherent Vice a direct adaptation of the Pynchon novel.

    Chandler's work and the Big Lebowski precede both the book and film versions of Inherent Vice, and they share a very similar style. Specifically a las Joel Cohen's statement: "We wanted to do a Chandler kind of story – how it moves episodically, and deals with the characters trying to unravel a mystery, as well as having a hopelessly complex plot that's ultimately unimportant".

    Jurassicsnark may be more perceptive about the stylistic DNA of PT Anderson's film than you're giving him credit for. You got to say intertextual though!
    This is all very obvious, but thanks for unpacking my statement I guess. They are all refractions of a pulp archetype so to be surprised by "similarities" reveals a lack of experience with those texts.

    Didn't see him making the argument that PTA's style (genetic, epi-genetic, or otherwise) is related to the Cohen brothers.

  12. #112

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    Quote Originally Posted by galia View Post
    I must have pedestrian taste, because I despised dancer in the dark for being too "mélo" and I hated dogville with a burning passion for being contrived. I haven't seen breaking the waves. My favourites from what I've seen are Europa and Melancholia (I actually cried for like 20mns after watching Melancholia ahah). I don't really want to see Antichrist or Nymphomaniac. Maybe I just don't like him, I don't know.

    But what I most enjoyed of LVT is his TV series, it's just really fun
    I also loved Melancholia. It was a fantastic depiction of depression (von Trier suffers from melancholia), which ultimately leads to many people disliking it because they can't understand depression. I feel like a lot of his films actually are completely divided in opinion, which I love all the more. The more visceral reviews to a film that critics have the more I want to see it.

  13. #113
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    Quote Originally Posted by Arkady View Post
    Breaking the Waves or Dogville I'd say, though I was always impressed with Dancer in the Dark. He's a hit or miss little nazi for me, though. That reminds me I should get around to Nymphomaniac.
    Don't waste your time.

    Agreed that Breaking the Waves is his best film, though I have not seen Europa.

    For me it's more about growing up and not wallowing in misery and self-pity like I did in my teens and early twenties. If anyone wants my copies of Dancer in the Dark and Dogville DVDs - they are yours. Though I liked Dogville for its depiction of the "good folks" who really turn out to be vicious. Definitely see plenty of that.
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  14. #114

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    Btw do you know any film comparable to Dogville? Either by the theme (small puritan community hypocrytically endorsing exploitation) or the style/setup (sort of Brechtian cinema)?
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  15. #115
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    Maybe The Hunt somewhat fits: It's about pedophilia allgeations in a small community (also a Danish movie, language is however Danish here). Also, breaking the waves is by far the best von trier movie, I think in part due it being a movie about addiction made by a partially crazy alcoholic.. I found nymphomaniac to be probably his worst movie
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  16. #116

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    Quote Originally Posted by malaesthetique View Post
    Clearly you don't know it well enough--both films are intertextual adaptations.
    :)

    I did know that. But I meant it in a more thematic / cinematic / directorial way. Both films pretty much open with a guy alone in his house on the beach when an unexpected person/people show up and put the whole thing in motion... The "wandering daughter" thing, etc. I have only seen Inherent Vice once, in the theater, but I spent the entire time drawing parallels between characters and situations.

    Sounds like it's just me.

  17. #117

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    No you just aren't intimately familiar with pulp texts, goddamn philistine. There should be a licensing process for viewing well-made stoner cinema.



    The Hunt is a great recommendation, definitely get around to that one.

    As for Melancholia, as someone with manic depression I didn't think it was particularly successful in capturing anything except an atmosphere of ennui driven by a conceit. If you took the conceit away, it'd be a wholly intolerable film which is not always the case with a wholly intolerable palette of characters. For me the only relief came when the planet finally smashed all these fucking bores in their faces.

    Synecdoche, New York had a similar marrying of crushing loneliness and a strained conceit but that film felt successful in finding original perspective on the subject. For my money even Tom Ford's A Single Man was a more compelling examination of depression -- I quite liked that one, actually. McQueen's Shame. All of these actually burrow into the subject with finesse rather than dull dispassion.

    I think the other aspect to my revulsion is that I find "depression" an extremely tedious and uninspired subject for artmaking, namely because you'd have to be terminally ignorant not to be somewhat depressed on the Earth 2015. It's emotional demagoguery of the sort Von Trier has elaborated into a career.

  18. #118

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    Time to bump this thread, curious to see if people's lists have changed.

    My top 10 films:

    Manoel's Destinies (Ruiz)
    Pierrot Le Fou (Godard)
    Stalker (Tarkovsky)
    Eyes Wide Shut (Kubrick)
    In Bruges (McDonagh)
    Knight of Cups (Malick)
    La Collectionneuse (Rohmer)
    La Vie Nouvelle (Grandrieux)
    Hovering Over the Water (Monteiro)
    City of Pirates (Ruiz)

  19. #119
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    In Bruges? Really? I mean, it's a darling of a film, but top 10?
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  20. #120

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    Quote Originally Posted by Faust View Post
    In Bruges? Really? I mean, it's a darling of a film, but top 10?
    Yeah I see your point. It mostly has to do with the visuals and the music which I find incredibly beautiful and haunting. Probably also has to do with Bruges-la-mort having a clear influence on this film.

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