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Thread: Geoffrey B. Small

  1. #441

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    i have no doubt that it's an authentic cri de coeur. that's exactly why i found it noteworthy.

  2. #442

    Default THE SHOT HEARD 'ROUND THE WORLD:

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    THE SHOT HEARD 'ROUND THE WORLD:



    ITALY VOTES AND BANS NUCLEAR POWER ONCE AGAIN, AND LEADS THE WORLD TOWARDS A NEW FUTURE OF HOPE. "CHERNOBYL AND FUKUSHIMA WILL NOT HAPPEN HERE, AND WE WILL WORK WITH EVERYONE IN THE WORLD TO STOP THE MONSTER WHEREVER IT LAYS IT'S UGLY HEAD."

    VIVA L'ITALIA...



    WHILE news headlines in nuclearized countries around the world tout the possible demise of Silvio Berlusconi, the real story in yesterday's Italian Referendum is about the defeat of nuclear power by a totally home-grown grass-roots citizen's movement. Inspite of near totalitarian rule, total mass-media censorship, legal manoeuvres, and every trick and obstacle imaginable down to the very last minute, the Italian people have overcome it all and delivered a whopping defeat to the global nuclear renaissance and the now crippled Italian government that supported it.

    The return to nuclear power and the construction of up to 15 new and untested Areva EPR and Westinghouse AP1000 reactors and their consequential nuclear waste depositories to be located from Venice to Sicily has been literally made illegal in Italy as voted by law today in the historic June 12-13, 2011 Referendum.

    With the required quorum achieved and over 55.75% of the electorate participating, the vote is now legally binding with 61,579 department sections of 61.599 reporting so far.


    A landslide against nuclear power

    A mind-blowing 94.37% of the voters voted "Yes to Stop nuclear power in Italy."

    In one full and decisive swoop, Italy has once again become nuclear-free, and has returned to the world stage as a leader in the fast growing movement to stop nuclear power and commit instead to renewable energy production and technologies.

    With Germany, Switzerland, Austria, Italy, and Greece now in a new pan-european no-nuclear club, plans are already underway to increase continent-wide pressure on the world's 2nd largest nuclearized state- France, to shut down its 54 high-risk aging and accident prone-plants, where already 77% of the population wants to get out of nuclear power.

    The movement also is preparing to address the world's number one nuclear power, the United States, where recent polls indicate over 70% of the population fear a major nuclear accident will occur in at least one of its 104 aging plants, and over 54% do not want to fund any more new plant construction with public money.

    Today, as highly radioactive emissions still race totally out of control at Fukushima Dai-Ichi in Japan, for many, the pressure is on to shut down all the 162 reactors before the next Fukushima-style disasters risk taking place in either one of the two countries. Disasters that could place either Europe, North America, or both, at unthinkable risks.

    Earth to Obama and Sarkozy, can you hear this?








    .c. 2011.Geoffrey B. Small Fashion Against Nuclear

  3. #443

    Default not in vain

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    Fashion Against Nuclear: Not in vain.



    The Logomania special Art installation at the 54th Venice Art Biennale









    As part of our ongoing commitment and active participation in the Italian anti-nuclear movement that successfully stopped nuclear power in Italy yesterday in the historic referendum, the Logomania special Art installation at the 54th Venice Art Biennale "This is not a flower...Chernobyl. Fukushima. Venezia?" drew thousands of visitors from the international art world as well as the Italian public during the opening of the world's first and longest running international contemporary art exhibition, La Biennale di Venezia. Read the article in Purple by Olivier Zahm in Paris here... http://purple.fr/diary/entry/save-ve...-biennale-2011


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    Last edited by Geoffrey B. Small; 09-11-2014 at 09:27 AM.

  4. #444

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    Last edited by Geoffrey B. Small; 09-11-2014 at 09:27 AM.

  5. #445

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    I'll be there,
    and we'll have a ball again this time

    blessings
    ZB
    “You know,” he says, with a resilient smile, “it is a hard world for poets.”
    .................................................. .......................


    Zam Barrett Spring 2017 Now in stock

  6. #446

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    A lively and sometimes tough new interview is just out now in SEBASTIAN, a new biannual
    fashion/art magazine published by Hostem in London. http://www.sebastianmagazine.com/




































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    Last edited by Geoffrey B. Small; 09-11-2014 at 09:29 AM.

  7. #447

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    My man!!!! Great interview! No B.S. from G.B.S. Congrats to you and Italy!!

  8. #448

    Default thanks Clay!

    Dear Clay,

    Thanks so much as always, great to hear from you. And thanks for your congrats on Italy. Now we turn our eyes and our work to France and the almighty USA...starting with the most dangerous machine in America, the aging, poorly regulated, increasingly high-risk Indian Point nuclear power plant which puts over 20 million people in and around New York City at permanent risk of a Fukushima-level nuclear catastrophe. It sits right on an earthquake fault-line which is rated one of the highest seismic risks of any nuclear plant in United States and does not even have a sufficient evacuation or emergency plan for the population in sight. Just think about the nightmare possibilities of having to evacuate 20 million people from the greater NYC metro area in the case of a major nuclear disaster. As Fukushima continues to be covered-up, populations everywhere are being placed at more and more risk of yes, even more nuclear accidents all over the world. That's why they are covering it up. Out of sight, and out of mind. But the real and true danger does not go away. It is still there, like Indian Point, a sword of Damocles hanging right over New York City waiting to drop. I ask everyone in New York and every member of SZ to inform themselves and get behind Governor Cuomo of New York and the hundreds of community groups and organizations to shut down Indian Point now, before it is too late...

    Begin here: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3tkpq...ature=youtu.be

    and here
    http://www.shutdownindianpointnow.org/

    Thanks for your kind message, attention and action.

    Best wishes,

    Geoffrey

  9. #449

    Default Spring/Summer 2012 Paris women's collection presentation


  10. #450

    Default GBS interview in Masterpiece

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    Out Now : our February 2011 interview in Masterpiece


    I would like to thank our friends at Masterpiece for including our
    interview in their new publication now out called Masterpiece.

    Masterpiece is a new project by Antonio Macarro and Gorka Sorozabal.
    They propose a journey through fashion and its language built around
    various interviews via Skype that took place from March 2010 to
    February 2011, featuring conversations with Bless, Mark Eley, Linda
    Loppa, Tim Hamilton, Rosa Orrantia, Walter van Beirendonck, Gaspard
    Yurkievich, and many more… 19,5 x 25 cm 264 pages B/w English
    Softcover Published by Masterpiece. The book is available for purchase
    worldwide including here at Colette in Paris.

    Here below, excerpts from the interview...
























































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  11. #451

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    thanks maestro

    I just read it all............now you owe me 20 minutes

    see you soon my friend, see you soon!
    “You know,” he says, with a resilient smile, “it is a hard world for poets.”
    .................................................. .......................


    Zam Barrett Spring 2017 Now in stock

  12. #452

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    speaking of 99%/1% etc., a question. what are the 99% of people who can't afford GBS, or other handmade artisanal very expensive clothing, supposed to do to get their clothes? are they morally culpable for buying clothes from "destructive" companies?

  13. #453

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    Quote Originally Posted by Johnny View Post
    speaking of 99%/1% etc., a question. what are the 99% of people who can't afford GBS, or other handmade artisanal very expensive clothing, supposed to do to get their clothes? are they morally culpable for buying clothes from "destructive" companies?
    I think this is a different discussion for another time, and i'm not saying it doesn't relate because the article is about that
    I do believe there is a place for cheaper non Artsanal clothing, as H&M and such offers a chance for people of low budget to look well at a price that is affordable..........the problem is when these companies become too much the main providers of clothing for people of all backgrounds regardless of thier budget, the waste and excess that's created is indeed a problem, also the exploitation of people with wagings that arent reasonable for the amount of work involved in production of these products

    I don't want to discuss to much of my own work in this thread, as its about Geoffrey's, but someone like myself, does provide artisanal clothing at a less expensive price that a lot of other designers........that being said it isn't cheap, but buying what you really need, rather than a whole bunch of cheap stuff is always a better option.......
    “You know,” he says, with a resilient smile, “it is a hard world for poets.”
    .................................................. .......................


    Zam Barrett Spring 2017 Now in stock

  14. #454
    kitsch killer Faust's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Johnny View Post
    speaking of 99%/1% etc., a question. what are the 99% of people who can't afford GBS, or other handmade artisanal very expensive clothing, supposed to do to get their clothes? are they morally culpable for buying clothes from "destructive" companies?
    It is a very good question and worth pondering indeed. I oscillate on the subject. As Zam notes, ostensibly, the purpose of H&M is indeed to provide the poor with decent clothing. Only that's not what H&M does at all - most of its business is feeding rampant consumerism, giving the ability to people to indulge into guilt-free weekly shopping trips. Because they buy the clothes so cheaply, there is no awareness of the clothes as an object to be regarded. Also, the current pricing model of the clothes is fairly recent, from a historical perspective. It wasn't so long ago that a coat would cost an average person a month's salary. But it'd be a coat that was well made and one that you would cherish, care for, one that you would fix.

    Do you know what Dries van Noten's grandfather used to do for a living? He was the type of a tailor to whom people would bring their worn out suits. He would take the suit apart, turn the fabric inside out and put the suit back together, so it would look new again. Talk about sustainability - that's the kind of stuff we need to return to. So, yeah, I am all for expensive quality clothes. As Tomas Maier said, "Just have less."
    Fashion is a form of ugliness so intolerable that we have to alter it every six months - Oscar Wilde

    StyleZeitgeist Magazine

  15. #455

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    ^ might have to post your words somewhere hope you don't mind. really echoes my sentiments and articulates better than i could've hoped.

    commercialization ugh... seems to be the root of most all economic problems right now including the attitude towards spending that most americans have

  16. #456
    kitsch killer Faust's Avatar
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    I don't mind. Faustian wisdom for all! :-)
    Fashion is a form of ugliness so intolerable that we have to alter it every six months - Oscar Wilde

    StyleZeitgeist Magazine

  17. #457

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    Quote Originally Posted by Faust View Post
    As Tomas Maier said, "Just have less."
    Faust quotes Tomas Maier!!! OMG. j/k

    I've heard this opinion about H&M and consumerism quite a few times, however most of the people I know who go to H&M buy clothes because they look decent and are cheap. None of them buy new clothes every week, in fact they don't seem to be interested in buying new clothes at all, and buy new ones when they need them. I'm by no means saying it's always like that, but fashionistas who buy the latest high street copies are a very small segment of any high street's store clientelle - most people just don't give a fuck and want cheap clothes to wear.
    ENDYMA / Archival fashion & Consignment
    Helmut Lang 1986-2005 | Ann Demeulemeester | Raf Simons | Burberry Prorsum | and more...

  18. #458
    kitsch killer Faust's Avatar
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    I don't know, that's now what I see in New York.

    And yes, lol. Only The New Yorker can make me read an article about Tomas Maier! It was good, actually.
    Fashion is a form of ugliness so intolerable that we have to alter it every six months - Oscar Wilde

    StyleZeitgeist Magazine

  19. #459

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    Thank you all for your comments. It's great to see some thoughts on this subject.

    I think Faust is right. What is going on in New York is for sure also going on in the UK (see what I have to say below) and all over the world. For Johnny, your points ring big-time and they are excellent. Sure, we currently sell to the 1%. But I do believe, and in fact I know, that the 1% are not all the same in their outlook and attitudes towards where we are and where we are going. In fact, we view our role as an important one- that can actually inspire, inform and influence an enlightened portion of the 1% to act, invest and assist in bringing about changes to the discussion and in their own individual spheres of influence (which can be quite large) that are clearly necessary to resolve the many many problems that are facing this system that is so failing us now.

    In fact, we believe that about 80-90 percent of the 1% actually agree with most of the 99%, and they too can put pressure on the super-minority that is benefitting (greatly) from the suffering, sacrifice and yes, work, of many others. I stress here, I am not a socialist or a communist, I am a capitalist. I am an entrepreneur who has run his own company for almost 30 years, started from scratch in an attic, and able today to do things that long ago were just a dream. So I believe in a free market and private property, but what we are dealing with today is neither--we are dealing with an oligarchy that is now very globalized, and a form of capitalism that is being rigged only for the very largest players. It is not free and to me it is not capitalism in its true and honest form. And it is de-stabilizing everything economically and socially, for the benefit of a minority of business interests, at the expense of all other business interests and the economy in general. As a business owner, I have my own interests. And frankly, my business would be much better off if the 99% were back on their feet and doing well for themselves too. And that is true for about 99 percent of the rest of the companies trying to work in this economy now as well, especially in retail, fashion, textiles and dry goods in general. And with over 1 billion people around the world involved in those industries, that's a lot of people.

    Now let's look at Johnny's points. These are things we have thought through a lot, and they go at the core of our company and artistic mission. Again, yes we sell to the 1% now. We have to. Since 9/11 there has been less and less choice for designers, especially independent ones at our level to do otherwise. And with over 30 years of experience, we found ourselves uniquely positioned and capable to meet the requirements of this market in a way that few others could match. Our goal has been to set a new standard and model in the way the designer clothing approach should work. And we wanted to do this at the very top world levels because of the influence it might have and because we knew we could and few others, even if they had the dream to do so, would not have had the resources, experience, contacts and position in the industry to pull it off.

    And like Dries' father, I am a tailor. And for a good 15 years of my early career in Boston, I made clothes for people and repaired them, and I know this work very well. Done right, it can provide a living, great satisfaction, and help a ton of people around you. Indeed, it lies at the very heart of our success so far. The great Cristobal Balenciaga, made clothes for his local townspeople in Spain at a special local price they could afford. We just donated 52 cold-weather pieces to Occupy Boston and continue to provide alterations services to people if they need it in our local town. And like the late Enzo Ferrari, I also have no intention of creating a mass-produced brand to permeate the market with my ideas. I can build the Ferraris of the industry. But I cannot build the Fiats. So, the solution for the 99% is very clear to me, and I explain it as follows....

    It's called community self-help and "the return of the tailor to his/her former station in society" at the local community level. There was a time when the tailor was a very highly respected, well paid and valuable member of the community in which he/she served. We need in the world, and I hope to set an example, to teach and inspire, a new generation of practicing tailors--at least one in every community, that is competent enough to serve their community to develop, maintain and improve the clothing needs at the very best service/cost/benefit/long-term value relationship. Localized, Zero-km, personal, sustainable, trust-based community service, like the old-time doctor who knew his patients and made his housecalls and took care of the people in his community, earned his living from them, and put his earnings right back into his community with his purchases as well. I believe Zam is a perfect example of this, and a great one.

    But we need a lot more.

    And there is a lot of work to do, because one of the greatest costs of the current system is the total degradation and stripping out of education, training and skill sets of people, as companies managed by people who do not know how to make anything and do not respect what it takes to do it (believe me, I know these people-I went to business school with many of them) continuously refuse to invest in human beings and what they can do. Why? Because they view people as an expense instead of an asset. A cost instead of an investment. They were taught in business school like I was to de-skill everything as much as possible to lower costs. And there lies the heart of the problem. Making clothes is a labor intensive task. If you devalue and "de-skill" the human component, labor, the short-term cost of the article comes down. But so too does the value of the human being. Make no mistake about it, when you buy a 19.99 dollar item from a global corporation like H&M, you are participating in the devaluation of the people who had to make that piece as well as yourself. And since 1979, I have been on a personal mission to fight that tendency and prove that great clothes made by serious human beings should be valued far higher in their community and society than they are being held today.

    The tragedy to answer Johnny's points, is that people are morally culpable to a point, but what is really going on is that they are victims of a system that is leaving them with very little choice. Like a heroine dealer, the systematic de-skilling of mass populations is steadily making people poorer and poorer, and then more and more dependent upon giving their money to a solution which continues to make them more destitute and more dependent. This system is also being mirrored in the financial credit and banking industry with similar results.

    But there are still real solutions for people who are serious about getting out of the dependency:

    - Instead of de-skiling, re-skill, learn how to repair and even make your own stuff. Not only will you begin to save money, get what you want and need…but you will develop a skill that can begin to help earn a living helping others by repairing and making their clothes too. Don't laugh, that's why I am still in the game I am in, while many of my ex-competitors and colleagues are gone. I can sew and they cannot. Believe me, it's useful and it's worth money to you.

    - for God's sake, buy good used clothing (there is still no better value for money and environment and in the cases of Salvation Army, Goodwill Industries and others- for people in need, anywhere). 9 times out of 10 you will find better made, better fabric and better value than anything you can buy from a cheap fashion retailer today. It's no joke why Rei Kawakubo copied homeless people for CDG ideas and collections for years…if you have to live on the street, you cannot f__ around with your clothes. Your clothes are your house. And smart homeless people know how to find and pick the best possible clothes to keep them alive in the streets. You can do the same, and it's good enough for some of the best designers in the world to knock-off.

    - check out the growing number of tiny DIY startups and craftspeople on Etsy.com many are serious young entrepreneurs, want to offer a lot of service to the customer and offer relatively low prices. There may even be one or two right near you. Support a craftsperson starting out and who knows, it may turn out to be a very rewarding experience and collaboration in more ways than one. Certainly much more than continuing to feed the slavery trade monster that is trying to put that very same local craftsperson in your town out on the street and you on a perpetual mountain of credit card debt for nothing.

    - and practice the mantra of the sustainable movement "Reduce, Reuse, Recycle" and save your money to buy one serious piece of clothing that will serve you well and last you a lifetime. Not all of my customers are the 1%. Many of them have clothes they still use today that I made for them over 25 years ago. And they still look cool as hell too. Think about it, you pay once, but you get two and half decades of wear looking and feeling really good. And maybe a lot more. Like a job, or a promotion, a big sale, or even a spouse wearing those clothes that were built to last you a lifetime and be the very best that they coudl be. That's value. And that is also the cheapest in price in the long run, bar none.

    It's very much the old fashioned way. Like Faust was talking about with Dries' father. Practiced by people who survived world wars and great depressions. And that's what people need to learn once again today. (continued next post…)




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  20. #460

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    (continued from previous post…)

    thank you Merz, it's great to hear from you too. And I will heartily challenge Micheal Kard's comments above with the perceived alternative. I don't believe for a minute that those clothes look decent nor are they cheap. They are really expensive in more ways than one. And anybody that knows can see them from a mile away. One is only fooling oneself when one gives the heroine dealer his money. "You are an addict. You are hooked on a substance which is killing you. And you are paying to do it." And when it comes to H&M, Zara, Target and the rest, just like a junkie's eyes and face, the clothes will give you away to anyone who knows what to look for. They will know that this is a person who is truly poor, in knowledge not money (the last thing you would want to have to wear if you were homeless in NYC is H&M believe me, you would be dead after 1 winter night) ...but a person who has no recourse or knowledge other than to throw away money that he/she doesn't have. Like a drug-addict, a compulsive gambler at the table, or an alcoholic on his/her last legs, one can only look and say little. When looking for a job, or trying to climb in higher circles, eyebrows will be raised further under scrutiny for the very same reasons. Far better to wear some good quality, durable clothes from the Salvation Army even with no style and show you understand clothes, thrift and value, than expose oneself as knowing only waste, frivolity, superficiality and the corporate slavery way of life dictated to you by its TV and media. One should consider carefully, that when you don't give a f…, maybe it shows. And that too, can have its price. Let's look at the UK shall we…?


    In the UK alone people throw away over 2 MILLION TONS of fast fashion a A YEAR now.

    The average number of wears is about 6. And more importantly, they are a symbol of supporting and funding slavery around the world, all of them produced by people on average who are receiving less than 2 US dollars or 1,5p a day and living in perpetual poverty and enslavement in a system that will not create new customers for western exports and has taken away hundreds of millions of needed textile and clothes-making jobs from western industrialized countries in the past 20 years.

    You want to finance and support this? Go ahead, but don't kid yourself.

    if the hard fact is "most people just don't give a f__k and want cheap clothes to wear"… then they are only f___ing themselves. If you ever tried to make yourself a piece of useable clothing you would begin to understand that there is no such thing as cheap clothes. I have been making clothes all of my life in both tiny and enormous quantities, and I can tell you that clothes take an unbelievable amount of time and skill to create. And someone has to pay for it somewhere. If the end-line customer doesn't pay for it, and the company with the label on it or its retailer doesn't pay for it, then the person who made it has to pay for it- by working for nothing. And that is what all those people buying that destructive junk are supporting. And it is also what I have spent my whole life fighting. And the fact that all the slave labor in cheap fashion is then also being wasted on petrochemical plastic-based polyester fabrics which create a myriad of other damaging effects on human beings and the environment makes it all the more self-destructive for all of us.

    I believe strongly that they would be all much better off if they paid more to someone who was in their local community, and kept the money in the community where it would come back to them in a myriad of ways, and as a result- their own job or business prospects would be infinitely greater, than a system which is stripping both the money, the jobs and the businesses out of their community like a vacuum hose. I base this on my experience of living and working both in America and in Europe over the past 35 years and seeing the devastation happen on both sides of the Atlantic.

    As further evidence and testimony I urge you all to carefully review and reflect on all of the entries below. Starting with this important story on where all that UK fast fashion shopping is taking us….

    Fast fashion from UK to Uganda
    From the catwalks of London to the rubbish heaps of Kampala the impact of fast fashion is wide and deep. And if the trend continues, the West's wardrobes will be feeding landfill tips around the world for many years to come.

    The dirty pile of clothes lies nestled in a heap of hypodermic needles, empty water bottles and mangled cardboard.
    Prising a black blouse from the rest of the mix reveals a popular British brand name on the collar. It would be an unremarkable sight on any rubbish tip in Britain, but instead of being surrounded by seagulls, giant Marabou storks are picking their way over the hills of waste. Welcome to one of Uganda's largest landfill dumps, an artificial hill built by some of the 1,500 tonnes of rubbish thrown away by the inhabitants of the capital city Kampala every day. To find British High Street brands among all this is not only a sign of the impact of globalisation but also a symptom of the UK's growing addiction to throwaway fashion...

    http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/uk_news/7899227.stm?lss


    Fashion's environmental impact
    The government has launched a campaign to tackle the environmental impact of a "fast fashion" culture in a bid to make the industry more sustainable from production to disposal of garments...

    http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/africa/7903079.stm


    And what people are getting paid to make your stuff...


    STRIKE HITS NIKE VIETNAM FACTORY
    The average monthly salary at the Taiwanese-owned plant is about $59...
    http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/business/7324242.stm


    AND WHY THEY HAVE TO STRIKE...
    The following report was provided by Thuyen Nguyen, of Vietnam Labor Watch, who recently returned from a 16-day fact-finding tour of Nike factories in Vietnam. This report begins with Nguyen's statement at a 3-27-97 press conference and then goes on to highlights of his findings...
    http://www.clrlabor.org/alerts/1997/nike_worker1.html


    Is Primark really ethical? Garment workers tell their story
    In response to media reports of terrible conditions in their supplier factories Primark launched their "Ethical Primark" website, aimed at reassuring their consumers that they are an ethical company. When Shuma Sakar, a Bangladesh worker producing Primark clothes, and Shahida Begum from the the National Garment Workers Federation in Bangladesh came to visit Labour Behind the Label in the UK we asked them what they thought of Primark's claims-this is their response......
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WgJh7...eature=related
    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/arti...t-60p-day.html


    How about some English kids who went over and found out what it's like for themselves?
    This is great, you should see and listen to what they went through, and they're the lucky ones, they got to go home to the UK after a few weeks….

    NEWSNIGHT SPECIAL ON BLOOD, SWEAT AND T-SHIRTS
    Newsnight special with interviews with two of the people that took part in the television series blood, sweat and t-shirts.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=i55CQ...eature=related

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/thread/blood-sweat-tshirts/

    http://videos.howstuffworks.com/plan...urce-video.htm


    AND EVEN JUST IN TODAY'S NEWS….
    Cambodian Workers for U.S. Brands Stage Strike

    Workers at a Cambodian garment factory that produces clothing for major U.S. retailers have gone on strike over the suspension of their union representatives. The Workers Friendship Union Federation says the strike will continue until the three union representatives are re-instated. The factory produces garments for U.S. brands Gap, JC Penny and Old Navy.
    http://www.democracynow.org/2011/11/30/headlines#11


    This is where your money goes when you buy from these companies.
    Think about it. There are a lot of alternatives. All of them, for me, far more elegant, cool, less-expensive, and respectable than supporting this.

    Thanks for your consideration.

    Best wishes, Geoffrey



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