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Thread: Geoffrey B. Small

  1. #101

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    Quote Originally Posted by Johnny View Post
    Yes but my point is that what the things looks like seems not to be the most important thing, and if that's right, the value of the original garment can't be undermined by a copy using inferior materials. I don't just mean financial value in this respect. If the target customer is as sophisticated as indicated, I don't see how they would feel aggrieved at seeing an inferior copy. They did not purchase the item for the way it looks (this is pretty much GBS's main point and what he starts off his post by commenting on), but for how it is made and what sort of materials are used, and this, it seems to me, cannot be copied.
    yes, of course, sorry for re-stating the obvious.

    hmmm.....

  2. #102
    kitsch killer Faust's Avatar
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    Mind blown. Thank you Geoffrey. This is the kind of stuff that makes SZ what it is. Will post more later - on the iPhone now.
    Fashion is a form of ugliness so intolerable that we have to alter it every six months - Oscar Wilde

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  3. #103
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    good read. i respect what you do gbs, but i can't help but feel a bit insulted by the fact that, in your view or written summation, people who may find some of the design choices questionable are less intelligent and uninformed.
    Did you get and like the larger dick?

  4. #104

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    it is one of the few moments when i save a webpage on my comp again. thanks a lot Mr. Small for the post. much inspired and Iappreciate your vision which leads to your beautiful works.
    I don't exist.

  5. #105

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    lovely article. I can appreciate the thought and detail that goes into every aspect of each piece. The button ideas are nice but like others, I disagree with the final result. Certainly nothing wrong with that as it's an aesthetic opinion.

    Your approach is a truly artisanal one... something that i strive for personally as well.

    Looking forward to reading more of your posts Geoffrey!

    I like how you have addressed the issue of risking copies of your work or derivations based on internet pictures. Unfortunately even a close knit community such as SZ is not immune to such things and certainly is open for anonymous perusal. Designing and work presentation is this precarious balance of wanting to show what you've created while at the same time wanting to protect the same. Certainly there are pieces that I've constructed that can be seen only in stores because of design reasons.

    Again, great superlong post! Look forward to more!
    www.AlbertHuangMD.com - Digital Portfolio Of Projects & Designs

    Merz (5/22/09):"i'm a firm believer that the ultimate prevailing logic in design is 'does shit look sick as fuck' "

  6. #106

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    Really enjoyed His post, and yes he might have been a little aggressive on some points puting others as less intelligent, but for me it just seemed that he was just that much passionate on his work.

    I really wouldn't mind having a piece with different buttons, it might actually be an interesting twist to other stuff I own.

    Will be looking forward to Geoffrey's future posts..

  7. #107

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    Bravo Geoffrey. Bravo!

    Many elements of your approach and philosophy held a particular resonance with me. For instance, as one of 8 kids, we were dirt poor growing up, and our Mum used to make many of our clothes (of which I was greatly ashamed at the time). It never occurred to me until now that this might - just might - have been a contributing factor in why I now actively seek out clothes that are not mass produced, that have an intimacy or 'story'.

    I own 2 of your pieces and love them to death! I fear though, that your passionate post and growing presence here and elsewhere may prove a double-edged sword for consumers like me (i.e. I'm still not rich and you've still gotta eat!) ;-)

  8. #108

    Default WOW!!!!

    Holy !!!! I really enjoyed that! Thank you Mr. Small!!!

  9. #109

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    Excellent read, and thank you Geoffrey for taking the time to share that with us.

    I think some of you are misconstruing Geoffrey's point re being informed and aesthetic opinion. He's simply stating the fact that those that disagree with the aesthetic use of these buttons just probably haven't had the chance to see them in person.
    The informed individual will recognise the difference between the usual button and the buttons that GBS uses once one has the opportunity to see, smell, and touch this garment, try it on, feel these buttons, and actually use them and come to understand them. I mean, how many of us have handled these garments in person?
    let us raise a toast to ancient cotton, rotten voile, gloomy silk, slick carf, decayed goat, inflamed ram, sooty nelton, stifling silk, lazy sheep, bone-dry broad & skinny baffalo.

  10. #110

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    Well it's not like all other designers use buttons that are not made with quality.

  11. #111

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    Quote Originally Posted by Aleks View Post
    Well it's not like all other designers use buttons that are not made with quality.
    Did you even read what Mr. Small had to say?
    ________
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    Last edited by toulouse; 01-23-2011 at 12:04 PM.

  12. #112

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    Quote Originally Posted by merz View Post
    I have, and I don't feel any more favourable towards them than I did beforehand.
    Fair enough. I am yet to have that opportunity, but the more I saw these buttons, the more curious I became about them, wondering if there was a story behind each one. Reading these pages, I was happy to find there was alot more to it than met the eye.
    let us raise a toast to ancient cotton, rotten voile, gloomy silk, slick carf, decayed goat, inflamed ram, sooty nelton, stifling silk, lazy sheep, bone-dry broad & skinny baffalo.

  13. #113
    kitsch killer Faust's Avatar
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    I think there are two sides to the whole button debacle (really wanted to write "debuckle") - a garment side and an object (as in a button) side. I can understand merz, who is a very monochromatic guy, not liking different buttons on a garment, because it takes away subtlety. I am sure at the same time that he could admire the buttons themselves just like any other artisan-appreciating aesthete.
    Fashion is a form of ugliness so intolerable that we have to alter it every six months - Oscar Wilde

    StyleZeitgeist Magazine

  14. #114

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    A phenomenal read! You really showed your passion through the writing, and now I can't wait to see some of your clothes in person.

    Would be great to read what you have to say about fabrics too.

  15. #115

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    Quote Originally Posted by toulouse View Post
    Did you even read what Mr. Small had to say?
    yes of course I did, that every button has a different story and it is very moving, however, I just believe that the different colour of buttons adds a "patch-work" aesthetic appeal which I can not relate to. I applaud Geoffrey's vision and dedication to quality and strive to have that dedication in my own work.

    I just believe that the clothes would look better with one set of wonderful buttons per garment, not having one garment that is technically the same.

    I do like his fabrics and the varying colour of the clothes.

  16. #116

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    Wow that was fun.
    Thank you all for reading and for your comments.

    My apologies to those who felt that I might be questioning people's intelligence. That is not at all what I intended. I was trying to make a point about how informed someone might be on a subject, and there is a difference. I also wished to make a point about taste. As the saying goes," there's no disputing taste." So in that regard, buttons all the same, buttons with special stories...whatever.... to each his or her own. I simply felt it was important to attempt to explain the reasons behind why some of our clothes have a different approach to buttons than most others at the moment.

    Since the early 1980's, I have tried to live by a set of principles in regards to everything that involves my work. One of these principles is "Respect for the Individual." Everyone is a human being and needs to be treated as such, even when events and situations may make it difficult to do so. So again, my apologies to anyone who felt disrespected by my comments.

    I would however, add that even designers are human beings. And after looking over quite a few threads on SZ, I would like to state on behalf of some colleagues of mine in the field, that perhaps some of the negative comments towards designers could also be done a little bit more respectfully. Many of us have sacrificed a lot, worked our hearts out, gotten little economic benefit (even though the image is usually quite the opposite, you would be amazed at some of the stories I could tell you), and if, and when, confronted with some of the comments from people with no real names, identities or comprehensible reasons to be criticizing, and even joking and laughing, about what we need to do to make a living or maintain our companies in a very very tough field...well, one can feel a little disrespected on our end as well.

    For example, I really have to say that Alessio Zero, has been given a bum rap by some of the people on the thread of Layer-0, that he simply does not deserve. I have spoken to him about it, and his feeling for SZ is that he wants absolutely nothing to do with it all. He does not seek or want any press, he did not ask for his thread, he cannot respond to the SZ critics (he is studying some English for work but is not fluent enough to defend himself sufficiently), and some of the critics are actually competitors: other designers and ex-business associates hiding behind anonymous names. I will be the first to state that Alessio is no joke as a designer. He works very hard, and has made the sacrifices and paid the price necessary to have shown 4 collections in Milan, and 7 in the toughest racket of all, Paris, which is a lot more than many in this field can say. He is putting out some very good and unique work, and he is selling-out in some of the best shops in the world. I know because I have shown alongside him for quite a few seasons. He deserves better than what SZ has given him. And I need to say so for the record and believe that apologies are in order from certain parties.

    If people want SZ to be a place where one can seriously discuss things about design, including serious active professionals working at the top levels of the game, then I think we need to respect that everyone including the designers are people, who often work very hard, are commited to their work and have very human feelings about their works etc. If I sounded a bit aggressive to some in my own recent posting, that's a little bit about maybe where it's coming from. Sorry, but if you go through the forum threads, especially on less publicized and marketed designers, sometimes they start resembling a mud wrestling pit instead of a dedicated discussion to design, art, culture etc.. There's a lot of stuff that most SZ'ers just do not ever see or have access to (but that is a whole other posting for later) that is really good, perhaps it can begin to be shared on SZ, but the atmosphere has to be cool enough and worth the effort.

    Meantime, I will try to put together a new posting on fabrics as requested. I would also like to ask all the SZ people stateside to email and get on your state representatives and Senators to pass health care reform with a public option and single-payer initiatives. I know some of you can afford to drop your cash at Atelier or Maxfield on your CCP or Guidi, or whatever, so maybe it's not a problem for you, but there are an awful lot of people who work (or are out of work) in this industry at all levels in the U.S. who have no health care coverage whatsoever. I know quite a few of them. And they need something better than what they have right now in the U.S. as the system stands. The price of one pair of Guidi shoes doesn't even make a dent in the monthly payment for Ruggiero's Bentley, but it would keep a family of four who had someone in the hospital covered for one month in America and out of personal bankruptcy and home foreclosure. Living in Italy where there is a public system for all the people has totally changed my attitude about government health care. Please get involved and help make it happen in the States now, before it's too late for many....

    You can learn more at the sites here:

    Moveon & R.E.M.
    http://pol.moveon.org/healthcare_can...53-zh6Dvxx&t=3

    http://www.pnhp.org/

    http://my.barackobama.com

    Especially when it comes to creative people in the arts, there is a huge amount who cannot get health care right now in the United States. I have always felt that fashion needs to relate more to the real needs of contemporary society than it has been doing for a long time. So bear with me, this too is part of my design concept and work. Teddy may be dead. But we aren't. Let's get this thing passed once and for all: Health Care Reform Now. For Teddy, for us, for America.

    Yes, we can.

    Thanks again to all of you for your kind attention, comments,
    and reading.

    Best wishes to all of you,

    Geoffrey & the Team

  17. #117

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    thanks again Geoffrey,
    always good to read your posts and i am happy to see you contibuting more................
    “You know,” he says, with a resilient smile, “it is a hard world for poets.”
    .................................................. .......................


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  18. #118

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    Thank you Mr. Small for bringing to light an aspect much forgotten. Yes, designers are people with feelings too. There is too much bashing of work coming from people who know nothing. How easy it is to cast stones upon creations and creators who have no idea the sacrifices that must be made to dedicate a life to such passions. Dismissal of a design is fine if not liked, but bashing from a lack of understanding is upsetting to say the least. I understand why STEALTH, hobo, and other industry heads get so upset when reading forums. They see that those with the least understanding have the biggest mouths and it can make one very angry when seeing things from the other side of the fence.
    And thank you for bringing up Alessio Zero. I happen to know that one of the main posters showing greatest opposition is doing so as a direct result of Mr. Zero's successes. Jealousy rears its ugly head. I will not name names, but to say that Mr. Zero's bum rap is undeserved is an understatemnt. His work is strong! It is very refreshing to come here and read posts like yours. It gives me hope for places like this. There are intellegent people here, but many are uninformed and the arrogant ignorance is maddening.
    So thank you for being a voice of reason.
    ________
    volcano review
    Last edited by toulouse; 01-23-2011 at 12:04 PM.

  19. #119

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    As a person who has only viewed the pieces online, I now have a greater appreciation of the work that has gone into your garments from your insights on the buttons you've used. I imagine that the same thought and detail has gone into the fabrics and the process of completing each piece in your collection. Thanks again.
    Quote Originally Posted by eat me View Post
    If you can't see the work past the fucking taped seams , cold dye wash or raw hems - perhaps you shouldn't really be looking at all.

  20. #120
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    Mr. Small, your intellectual posts opened up my mind and eyes on the complexity of the industry in general and my view on fabrics, garments and other details that I overlooked before.

    Also your awareness on other issues as social and environment that transcends beyond nations border to support, encourage and start sustainable approaches and helping other people.
    It is also my personal belief that having a sustainability awareness, ethic or mindset is the way to the future.

    Thank you very much for the deep insight you have provided, please keep on posting, do sincerely appreciate your thoughts, works and efforts.

    Best regards,

    Joh

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