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Thread: Paris, a new thread

  1. #41
    Senior Member MaxM's Avatar
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    Well basically it depends if you want to work in France later or not.
    If so, the way to go is to study at a business or engineering school (in your case), since universities are pretty much considered lower level (in France), at least if you are not studying something very specific.
    Most of these schools need you to pass an exam, but i think you can apply as a foreigner and i guess you would be more likely to get in if you apply as such.

    As for universities, they have to accept anyone (though i don't know how it works for foreigners, anyway it is way easier to get in than in 'schools' because universities are not supposed to select the students).

    edit: if you absolutely want to study in Paris (in the city), you probably will have to go with a university since most schools are located outside of Paris because of their big(ger) campus.

  2. #42
    Senior Member MaxM's Avatar
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    In both cases, moving to France to learn French seems to be a good idea since universities and schools ask for a certain grade at french tests.

  3. #43
    Senior Member munch's Avatar
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    I don't mind studying a bit outside the city, or even in another city, if I happen to like it there. I'll just have to see for myself, which I'm hoping to do soon (autumn)

    I honestly had no idea that you separated schools/universities like that. university/"high school" is the highest in here it seems. but not highschool like in the US, it's on the same level as gymnasium here in sweden.
    but language wise, do you need some kind of french language certificate to actually study all french courses, and not english/internationally?
    or do you believe there are enough english only programs?

    well it does seem I have a lot of research to do!

    thanks a lot for the answers

    edit: oh, I got a question answered before even asking it :)

  4. #44
    Senior Member munch's Avatar
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    well, if I understood it correctly, there is a possibility to get student grants/student loans from the swedish Central Study Committee (I think that would be an accepted english translation?) for studying languages in another country, and taking student loans is something you'll have to do if you're not filthy rich to study and not live at home. or get a job while studying, but that's not something you can take for granted.
    I think being surrounded by lots of people speaking the language really helps when learning it

    I'll have a look at that test, sounds like I have a goal to reach!

    thanks

  5. #45
    Senior Member MaxM's Avatar
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    Well spending one year in France will really get you fluent. I was at an international high school and we had foreign students coming regularly. After one year most of them were fluent, or very comfortable with French.

  6. #46
    Senior Member munch's Avatar
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    great, that's what I was hoping for. I am very comfortable with language studies so I'll do my best and even better than that, and maybe even a bit better than so. I'll just have to decide if this is my final destination now and do the research.
    do you know which schools that has french language courses, are considered better? or should they all be good enough?
    thanks

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  8. #48
    Senior Member munch's Avatar
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    bringing up le food again... decided to take a trip to paris this autumn
    any good places for real napoli pizza? chunks of buffalo mozzarella, fresh made tomato sauce, basil and olive oil? just plain margherita pizza.
    also I happen to have a love for good hamburgers, not the fast food kind, I would guess paris have some good alternatives? I heard there's a place called american breakfast or something, which supposedly have decent burgers.
    ramen? scoute has this Tokyo Eats place listed, but the website listed seems more like art exhibitions than a restaurant, which it probably is, with a restaurant in it? well the name just suggests it might have some japanese style ramen in it, please confirm/deny
    google also gave me Sapporo Ramen, and it does sound nice

    any other food suggestions that might not be too expensive? not going to go 3-star and dish out 200 euros for a tasting menu or something, would like to keep it <30 euros a meal or so~

    and for something else than food, I'd like to go see some impressive architecture, both new and old. what would you guys recommend?

    thanks

  9. #49

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    Tokyo Eats is the restaurant of the Palais de Tokyo, which is a museum/art gallery type of place, but I don't think it serves ramen specifically, or even Japanese food at all.

    For good and cheap Japanese, go to Higuma in rue Sainte Anne

  10. #50

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    xxxxx
    Last edited by Dropt; 09-09-2012 at 05:31 PM.

  11. #51

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    Tokyo Eats is european/fusion food. food is alright, nice atmosphere.

    for ramen, I'd suggest Higuma. I was taken here on a chilly friday night by two gentlemen called Geoffrey Small and Alessio Zero, who according to rumours has devoured two of the litre sized bowls.
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  12. #52
    kitsch killer Faust's Avatar
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    munch, stay away from japanese food in paris. i've been dragged a few times - never again! you hear me, parisians?! duck confit!!!
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  13. #53
    Senior Member munch's Avatar
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    oh lol, what a confusing name. well I still heard it's good, so might have to try it.
    Dropt: that looks like a nice place, will check it out!
    galia/lowrey: allright, since you both recommended it I guess it can't be bad.
    I bet I could down 3 of those bowls if I am hungry enough!

    Faust: can't do that after lowrey/galia's suggestion sorry! but if I dislike it, I'll follow your advice

  14. #54

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    oh, I missed galias post, haha.

    the bowls are pretty huge.
    "AVANT GUARDE HIGHEST FASHION. NOW NOW this is it people, these are the brands no one fucking knows and people are like WTF. they do everything by hand in their freaking secret basement and shit."

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  15. #55

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    Add one more recomendation, I really like Higuma ramen. But then again, I've never tasted real ramen so I guess it doesn't count. I'll try some in New York this summer and see if there really is a difference.

    For more contemporary japanese food, I like IssÚ rue de Richelieux (approximately 1 minute from Higuma). Definitely not your traditional Japanese. The chef owns a shop of fine japanese groceries and teaches cooking classes. It's pretty affordable and they have a nice selection of sakÚ.

    Oh, and I've eaten at the PDG a few times, the other one in the 8th district. I'm not big on hamburgers, but my friends always seem delighted there.

  16. #56

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    for moderately inexpensive eats:

    ("contemporary Japanese")
    Restaurant Shu: 8, rue Suger 75006
    kind of European Japanese, with a leaning towards the more traditional side of Japanese. maybe a bit more savory (garlic-based?) than pure traditional Japanese in a strict sense. but still has traditional dishes like inaiwa udon or ochazuke for a nice finish to the meal. moderately nice and yet comfortable inside.

    (thai)
    Thaim
    46, rue de Richlieu, 75001

    Thiou
    49, quai d'Orsay, 75007

    (bistros)

    Chez L'ami Jean
    27, rue Malar 75007

    Chez Michel
    10, rue de Belzunce 75010

    L’Os Ó Moelle
    3, rue Vasco de Gama 75015

    L'Entredgeu
    83, rue Laugier 75017

    Hotel Du Nord
    102, quai de Jemmapes 75010

    also make sure to try Le404 for Moroccan food (tagine, harissa, mint tea...) and any of the falafel/schwarma places on Rue de Rosiers just a block up from the L'Eclaireur on Rue Mahler in le Marais.

    for a nice snack, head over to Le Grand Epicerie (in Bon Marche department store), grab a baguette and some Iberian ham and a bottle of wine and have a nice mid-afternoon picnic by the Eiffel tower with some friends before a late dinner.
    Last edited by kompressorkev; 04-14-2010 at 07:04 PM.

  17. #57
    kitsch killer Faust's Avatar
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    /\ my favorite thing to do while pretty much anywhere in Europe is just walking into a good deli, grabbing some bread, cheese, ham and wine and having a picnic. a nice change from the uncivilized country we live in where you have to hide your alcohol in a bag (in those rare places where they permit you to drink to begin with).
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  18. #58

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    yes ham, bread, wine, setting sun - now that's a vacation.

  19. #59
    Senior Member munch's Avatar
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    you're allowed to drink alcohol outside in France? in sweden it's disallowed afaik. only in restaurants/bars/clubs/at home. I love picnics and baguettes!

    lowrey: so is my apetite!

    ronin: cool, I'll def go check out the grocery store! perhaps a sake tour too.
    hope your friend's right about PDG. thanks!

    kompressorkev: nice list! I hope I can have a look at them all.
    do they serve real thai hot thaifood? I always get disappointed when ordering thai food here.
    not sure where I might find friends for picnic though... but that's another quest!

    thanks a lot peoples and poeples

  20. #60
    kitsch killer Faust's Avatar
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    That's cause you swedes are a bunch of alcoholics in tight jeans! ;-)
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