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  • smudge
    replied
    Do you think darning the fabric around the seams would work as a way to reinforce the area or would the loose weave still be an issue with the darning threads? Assuming you can do it neatly
    Originally posted by zamb View Post
    the problem isn't the stitch nor is it the fabric.

    the issue us that the weave of the fabric is too loose for the kind of construction used to make the garment. as such the garment will not last very long with a lot of wear

    the only way to solve the eventual of the issue of the seams coming apart is to reinforce the seams of the garment with some kind of woven fusing. ( a woven fabric with a glue bonding to it. ) you could cut the fusing into strips about 1- 1.5" wide and fuse it over the sewn area of the seam
    this should have probably been done before the garment was made, but wasn't.

    it can be done now but will be rather laborious. if you like the garment I'd say give it a shot.

    Leave a comment:


  • udbrud
    replied
    Would be disappointing if that's the case - would (and have previously had reason to) expect better from Layer-0.

    Having a somewhat hard time imagining this solution - do you have any visuals that might exemplify?
    I've used vliseline (interfacing? Don't actually know if there's a proper english word for it) to reinforce the seams currently ... which seems to work alright, but isn't entirely dependable, it seems.

    Originally posted by zamb View Post
    the problem isn't the stitch nor is it the fabric.

    the issue us that the weave of the fabric is too loose for the kind of construction used to make the garment. as such the garment will not last very long with a lot of wear

    the only way to solve the eventual of the issue of the seams coming apart is to reinforce the seams of the garment with some kind of woven fusing. ( a woven fabric with a glue bonding to it. ) you could cut the fusing into strips about 1- 1.5" wide and fuse it over the sewn area of the seam
    this should have probably been done before the garment was made, but wasn't.

    it can be done now but will be rather laborious. if you like the garment I'd say give it a shot.

    Leave a comment:


  • zamb
    replied
    the problem isn't the stitch nor is it the fabric.

    the issue us that the weave of the fabric is too loose for the kind of construction used to make the garment. as such the garment will not last very long with a lot of wear

    the only way to solve the eventual of the issue of the seams coming apart is to reinforce the seams of the garment with some kind of woven fusing. ( a woven fabric with a glue bonding to it. ) you could cut the fusing into strips about 1- 1.5" wide and fuse it over the sewn area of the seam
    this should have probably been done before the garment was made, but wasn't.

    it can be done now but will be rather laborious. if you like the garment I'd say give it a shot.

    Leave a comment:


  • udbrud
    replied
    That kind of modification probably isn't always a possibility, and definitely not in this case. It's a good suggestion, when it is an option though.

    The problem is actually more, as I wrote, that the threads are literally ripping the fabric apart. Layer-0 uses a very similar overlocking technique, which is probably one of the most durable seams I've seen, but as it's used on linen in this case, it seems to be almost too strong.

    Anyway, I've attempted with some cotton seam tape along all major seams, which actually seems to have stabilized it a bit. Time will tell.

    Originally posted by ProfMonnitoff View Post
    Bias tape and similar finishings are more cosmetic, and really don't add a noticeable amount of strength IMO.

    If you don't mind changing the look of the garment slightly, you can make a flat felled-like seam (technically it's not one, but it has similar strength).

    Overlock the seam allowance, both sides at once. Then press it down to one side, and topstitch over it once or twice. It looks something like the inseam of a regular pair of jeans, but if you use matching thread it can be nearly invisible.

    The downside of this is that such a seam is so strong that what ends up happening sometimes is the fabric just rips next to the seam instead.

    Leave a comment:


  • ProfMonnitoff
    replied
    Bias tape and similar finishings are more cosmetic, and really don't add a noticeable amount of strength IMO.

    If you don't mind changing the look of the garment slightly, you can make a flat felled-like seam (technically it's not one, but it has similar strength).

    Overlock the seam allowance, both sides at once. Then press it down to one side, and topstitch over it once or twice. It looks something like the inseam of a regular pair of jeans, but if you use matching thread it can be nearly invisible.

    The downside of this is that such a seam is so strong that what ends up happening sometimes is the fabric just rips next to the seam instead.

    Leave a comment:


  • udbrud
    started a topic Seam reinforcement

    Seam reinforcement

    So ... we all know the problem, I expect: seams are pulling and threads are tearing at the fabric. So how the hell do we avoid ruining a nice garment?

    I have a pair of lightweight linen pants, where I've noticed a small amount of pulling at the seams, where the fabric seems to be thinning, at some stress points (crotch, obviously, as always). So what's a good approach to stop this before it becomes a real problem?

    I was considering trying to get a hold of some seam tape and running it along the seam, front and back, and hoping that would hold it together better and thereby avoid further pulling. Anybody have experience with this?
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