Page 3 of 6 FirstFirst 123456 LastLast
Results 41 to 60 of 111

Thread: TEA! (because coffee is so western european)

  1. #41
    kitsch killer Faust's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Long hard road out of hell
    Posts
    37,886

    Default

    Galia, and other Parisians, have you tried the little corner shop on Rue de Seine?
    Fashion is a form of ugliness so intolerable that we have to alter it every six months - Oscar Wilde

    StyleZeitgeist Magazine

  2. #42

    Default

    I never had tea there, but I'm still sad that Takashimaya closed before I moved here.

    I've only had tea and desserts at Cha-an and the desserts are great (I'm not even a huge dessert fan).

    In Pursuit of Tea finally got a Lapsang Souchong in that they liked so I bought a bag (their last) yesterday and it is very good. Not super smokey but it is very well rounded.

    I'm surprised NYC doesn't have more tea rooms. Maybe they are hidden within the Japanese/Chinese communities.
    THE HOUSE OF DIS
    embrace the twenty first movement

  3. #43

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by galia View Post
    I got the habit of drinking massala chai when I lived in India, not as refined as the green tea I normally prefer, but perfect as a meal substitute. anyone else make this?
    no, but try kashmiri simmered with milk and honey... no substitute for that in the world

  4. #44

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by thehouseofdis View Post

    I'm surprised NYC doesn't have more tea rooms. Maybe they are hidden within the Japanese/Chinese communities.
    no racism intended, more of an observation of cultural tendencies?

    chinese people hate paying for tea or spending on nice tea, they're fine with average run of the mill teabag stuff... most of them at least are like that (the 1st generation ones)

    you may have more luck with the Japanese

  5. #45
    Senior Member Mail-Moth's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    In a french middleofnowhere
    Posts
    1,448

    Default

    Don't know about the teas, but that's a lot of packaging.

    Quote Originally Posted by Faust View Post
    Galia, and other Parisians, have you tried the little corner shop on Rue de Seine?
    I can see a hat, I can see a cat,
    I can see a man with a baseball bat.

  6. #46

    Default

    De Quincey in Confessions of an English Opium Eater, holding forth on the history of the tea-spoon (speaking in the context of laudanum servings):

    Now, a single quantity of one hundred will about fill a very old-fashioned obsolete tea-spoon, of that order which you find still lingering amongst the respectable poor. Eighty such quantities, therefore, would have filled eighty of such antediluvian spoons--that is, it would have been the common hospital dose for three hundred and twenty adult patients. But the ordinary tea-spoon of this present nineteenth century is nearly as capacious as the dessert-spoon of our ancestors. Which I have heard accounted for thus:--Throughout the eighteenth century, when first tea became known to the working population, the tea-drinkers were almost exclusively women; men, even in educated classes, very often persisting (down to the French Revolution) in treating such a beverage as an idle and effeminate indulgence. This obstinate twist in masculine habits it was that secretly controlled the manufacture of tea-spoons. Up to Waterloo, tea-spoons were adjusted chiefly to the calibre of female mouths. Since then, greatly to the benefit of the national health, the grosser and browner sex have universally fallen into the effeminate habit of tea-drinking; and the capacity of tea-spoons has naturally conformed to the new order of cormorant mouths that have alighted by myriads upon the tea-trays of these later generations.
    "adjusted chiefly to the calibre of female mouths" is quite some phrasing.
    ain't no beauty queens in this locality

  7. #47

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Faust View Post
    Galia, and other Parisians, have you tried the little corner shop on Rue de Seine?
    I didn't but I heard some great things from fashionistas I know. I think the one on place monge is probably better, but no deserts and minimal packaging

  8. #48
    kitsch killer Faust's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Long hard road out of hell
    Posts
    37,886

    Default

    /\ Ok. And thanks for the Maison des Trois Thes recommendation - my girlfriend had a ball.
    Fashion is a form of ugliness so intolerable that we have to alter it every six months - Oscar Wilde

    StyleZeitgeist Magazine

  9. #49

  10. #50

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Faust View Post
    Cows, you are in luck - girlfriend is a tea fanatic and I will share some of her recommendations with you. But she says that cows are not for eating!
    They're for making shoes ;P

  11. #51

    Default

    ... and you must boil the water in cast iron kettles/pots...



    ... traditional [antique/vintage]...






    ... in a more contemporary interpretation...






  12. #52
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    NYC and a CA surftown
    Posts
    709

    Default

    or silver kettles.

    I prefer antique tetsubins for anything aged or roasted (aged sheng, shu, yancha, roasted oolongs, harsh young sheng too) , and silver kettles for anything lighter (dan cong, taiwanese high mountain oolong, good young sheng, some japanese greens).

    Some very interesting articles on silver kettles vs iron tetsubins and how they effect water:

    http://the-leaf.org/issue4/wp-content/uploads/2008/12/gong-fu-tea-tips-issue-4.pdf

    http://the-leaf.org/issue%205/wp-con...etsubin333.pdf

    Last edited by trentk; 03-01-2012 at 11:06 PM.

  13. #53
    kitsch killer Faust's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Long hard road out of hell
    Posts
    37,886

    Default

    To break up the green tea nerdism, my favorite black tea, the south stockholm blend from the Tea Center of Stockholm.
    Fashion is a form of ugliness so intolerable that we have to alter it every six months - Oscar Wilde

    StyleZeitgeist Magazine

  14. #54
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    NYC and a CA surftown
    Posts
    709

    Default

    WAYDT

    Song Dynasty Plate (China, it had traces of a black tar like substance in the cracks when I bought it. Think it was opium.)
    Hagi-Yaki Yunomi ((Japan, Shibuya Deishi)
    80's Yixing (China)
    2004 Shu Puerh (Yunnan, one of Ming Yi Wang's students. Normally don't drink shu, but I make an exception for anything produced by or with Wang.)
    "He described this initial impetus as like discovering that they both were looking at the same intriguing specific tropical fish, with attempts to understand it leading to a huge ferocious formalism he characterizes as a shark that leapt out of the tank."

  15. #55

    Default

    trent they lied to u, those cast iron ones are ceramic lined inside ;)

  16. #56
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    NYC and a CA surftown
    Posts
    709

    Default

    only the cheap ones are lined, and those aren't used for boiling water. (but I think you already knew that)
    "He described this initial impetus as like discovering that they both were looking at the same intriguing specific tropical fish, with attempts to understand it leading to a huge ferocious formalism he characterizes as a shark that leapt out of the tank."

  17. #57

    Default

    i do appreciate ceramic as an insulator though, im less traditional and into the ceremonial aspect as i am into to taste so electric kettle for me ..


    but WOW that texture is real gorgeous wabi sabi right there

  18. #58
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    NYC and a CA surftown
    Posts
    709

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by cowsareforeating View Post
    i do appreciate ceramic as an insulator though, im less traditional and into the ceremonial aspect as i am into to taste so electric kettle for me ..
    I drink tea predominately for taste as well - you would be surprised how much water boiled in iron differs from that boiled in an electric kettle. Especially when the kettle has been used for a while and is coated in mineral deposits. There are also porous clay kettles you can use over charcoal "stoves", and these really change the texture/flavor of the water - http://tea-obsession.blogspot.com/20...olive-pit.html

    (anyone reading this who isn't into tea probably thinks I'm crazy for talking about water.... if you wish, try brewing the same loose leaf tea with two different waters, and you'll see that it does make a difference. If I was really a fanatic, I would add something about letting water before use in various ceramic water containers.... yes, I know people who have tried that. http://themandarinstea.blogspot.com/...ful-water.html )

    EDIT: where do you get your tea? one of the guys at my favorite tea shop in santa cruz worked at a tea shop in san diego or la jolla a few years ago. can't remember the name, but they had really good taiwanese tea, and it was one of the only serious tea shops in the area.
    "He described this initial impetus as like discovering that they both were looking at the same intriguing specific tropical fish, with attempts to understand it leading to a huge ferocious formalism he characterizes as a shark that leapt out of the tank."

  19. #59
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    NYC and a CA surftown
    Posts
    709

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by cowsareforeating View Post
    but WOW that texture is real gorgeous wabi sabi right there
    double post, but, scroll through this thread for some of the most interesting ceramic texture I've seen.... this is a must for anyone who oogles say ccp leather or luc fabric. http://www.teachat.com/viewtopic.php...562&start=1515
    samples:





    what I find most interesting is the cracks that develop in the lighter colored pieces. the tiny little fractures are there from the beginning, but you can only see them as use stains the ceramic:

    one more, good japanese green tea is almost fluorescent

    wait, 2 more:


    (I know... I'm obsessed)
    SZ edition, ballers only, costs more than some ccp leathers:
    Last edited by trentk; 03-03-2012 at 08:52 PM.
    "He described this initial impetus as like discovering that they both were looking at the same intriguing specific tropical fish, with attempts to understand it leading to a huge ferocious formalism he characterizes as a shark that leapt out of the tank."

  20. #60

    Default

    Those are some beautiful ceramics. I love the act of preparing and drinking tea, especially if one is fortunate enough to use such artful teapots and cups. I usually purchase teas from Adagio, vanilla green and gunpowder jasmine being my favorite, but I've bought pu'er tea lately on ebay that, while lacking the allure of the greens, is something interesting in its own right.

    Thought I'd resurrect this thread since winter (now occurring in the northern hemisphere) is the best time for a hot cup!

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •