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[DIY] Panel Scarf

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  • kuugaia
    Senior Member
    • Feb 2010
    • 1007

    [DIY] Panel Scarf

    I have always liked very long scarves, so I had an idea for one...and just decided to run with it. I guess I was in a very DIY type of mood after my drop crotch pants. It's very simple and I think many people would find it incredibly easy to do. This is the second item that I have created, so again, any comments or feedback would be appreciated for the novice.

    A look at the final product:


    I actually made two of these scarves (one red and one dark) and each consisted of 4 different colors. They both have multiple angled panels of different lengths and wrap around your neck three times. ~350x20cm. The size of the scarf is of course up to your personal preference.

    First Step: Choose your colors and fabric.
    This is fairly simple yet very time consuming process. It's up to you what kind of colors and/or patterns you would like, but I would have two suggestions to keep in mind when deciding. If there's going to be more than 3 different colors I suggest that they be similar in hue. That way it won't look so busy and...well...gross. Second suggestion is that the fabrics themselves are similar. Don't want to be mixing wool with silk for example.

    Take your time if you have a good selection to browse from.


    Second Step: Cut and organise.
    The lamest step out of all the steps to create this piece. The scarf is technically double sided, so if you have a total of 10 panels, you have to cut 20 separate pieces. I recommend just laying one of the fabrics down, slice it in half so you have two symmetrical pieces and then pin it together. Hopefully this way you will get symmetrical panels when you cut the angles through the stacked fabric (one color at a time). I determined my angle by 15cm across and 25cm down, but it's really up to you how angled you want it.



    The lengths of each panel also varied from ~15cm to ~50cm, the choice again is up to you. I can post the actual breakdown of my measurements/color order if people are interested.



    After you've cut all the fabrics (be sure to keep the symmetrical panels together), organize it into the order that you will be attaching them. In the following picture, I've stacked the fabrics in a way that you can't actually tell they're different lengths......but they are...



    Third Step: Attach the panels.
    Very straight forward process that can get mundane, fast. If you pre-organize the order like I explained then you will have a less likely chance of messing up this step...which happened to me...



    It is important that you pin the pieces down before you sew them together, otherwise the edges may not match up with its 'symmetrical' panel. Additionally you need to attach the ends slightly 'off' from another so that when it folds over it's actually straight. If you don't do this, your scarf will keep slanting downwards. I am not very good at articulating myself...so you're just going to have to trust me on this one. Do it like this:

    Last edited by kuugaia; 08-20-2010, 05:15 PM.
  • kuugaia
    Senior Member
    • Feb 2010
    • 1007

    #2
    Forth Step: Put it together.
    After you've finally connected all the panels together, you should have now only have two very long symmetrical pieces (hopefully). Like this:



    Lay them on top of each other, making sure the edges match up with each other and pin it together.



    Sew the two side edges and one bottom end, but LEAVE THE TOP OPEN. Then cut off the excess fabric.



    Fifth Step: Inside out sock.
    Pretty much you have an inside out sock now that needs to be pulled out. It might take awhile to get you hand all the way in there, but it'll be very satisfying once you do. Like this:



    Once it is the right way out, iron down the edges of the scarf. It is optional whether or not you sew the 'right way out' edges down again, but I found it isn't necessary. Up to you, the difference is marginal.

    Sixth Step: Finish the end.
    I am a total noob and could not think of a good way to close off the end. So this is how I did it, although if anybody knows of a more glamorous way...please let me know.



    So you should cut about 1cm on both of the side edges of the scarf. Now fold the two flaps inwards and iron it down. Just have a look at my thumb area in the picture and it should be quite clear what I'm talking about. After that I simply top sew the end with a thread color matching the fabric. But Chinorlz has explained a better method below, so try that instead.

    Finished product.


    The colors don't turn out too well in the different lighting but I hope some people found this DIY useful.
    Last edited by kuugaia; 08-21-2010, 12:59 AM.

    Comment

    • Chinorlz
      Senior Member
      • Sep 2006
      • 6422

      #3
      nice job and especially good eye for color combinations!

      Can't really tell exactly how you decided to close the end (did you just sew down the ends so the scarf is actually still open to the interior?

      If so, use your machine and sew the entire scarf almost all the way, leaving about 4-5" unsewn at one end so you can still pull the scarf inside out. Then you just sew that 4-5" by hand so that your scarf is completely finished with all raw edges inside and unseen.

      Good DIY :)
      www.AlbertHuangMD.com - Digital Portfolio Of Projects & Designs

      Merz (5/22/09):"i'm a firm believer that the ultimate prevailing logic in design is 'does shit look sick as fuck' "

      Comment

      • kuugaia
        Senior Member
        • Feb 2010
        • 1007

        #4
        ^ Thanks man, I really appreciate it coming from somebody like yourself.

        I'll try and edit in more specifically how I closed my scarf, but your way seems to be much more clean and effective. Although I'm unsure how you hand stitch the end so that the threads are unseen...it's not playing out in my head . But I'll try it out on the next one I make and hopefully it turns out okay.

        Comment

        • stefker
          Junior Member
          • Aug 2010
          • 15

          #5
          Very nice piece of DIY, you inspired me! I'll try it and let you know the results.

          Comment

          • kuugaia
            Senior Member
            • Feb 2010
            • 1007

            #6
            Definitely post up your creation man, I would love to see it! I am happy to know that somebody at least found this thread useful.

            Comment

            • alyen
              Junior Member
              • Oct 2015
              • 11

              #7
              I like panel work, I would have made them maybe in a less stiff fabric, but very good work nontheless!

              Comment

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